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LIBRARY OF 



Lasell Seminary, 

AUBURNDALE, MASS. 



18 



NoJ 



fo g 1.3* 



V7S 






Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

Federally funded with LSTA funds through the Massachusetts Board of Library Commissioners 



http://archive.org/details/lasellleaves26lase 



LASELL LEAVES 



PAPER 



By the Pound, for Society and School uses. 
All Sizes and Finishes. 

15c. to 60c. a Pound* 



Thorp & Martin Go. 

STATIONERS-ENGRAVERS. 

12 Milk St., Old South Block, Boston, Mass. 



Shreye, Crump & Low Co. 

147 Tremont St., Boston. 

JEWELERS and SILVERSMITHS. 



STATIONERY, CLASS and SOCIETY PINS. 

Designs submitted and estimates furnished. 



E. W. BURT & CO. 

invite the young ladies of Lasell Seminary 
to inspect their Fall Lines of 

Knickerbocker Shoes 

At their BOSTON STORE, 40 WEST ST. 

Students in the leading colleges and schools of the 
United States wear the Knickerbocker Shoe, made on 
Mannish Shaped Lasts in Wax Calf, Enamel, Box 
Calf, and all the popular leathers. Heavy soles, with 
wide edges for Golf, Skating and Walking Boots. 
Fancy Wing Tip Shoes a specialty. 



SEND TO_ 

SCHIRMEn S music store, 

(The Boston Music Company.) 



26 WEST ST., 



FOR 



BOSTON, MASS. 



Sheet Music, Music Books, Strings, etc. 

Prompt and efficient service as well as advantageous 
price guaranteed. The Singer's Guide, the Piano 
Teachers' Guide, and Choir Master's Guide sent gratis 
to any address. 



Cobb, Aldrich & Co. 



Corner of Washington and Kneeland Streets, Boston* 



ALWAYS have in stock 

THE NICEST assortment 



CRYSTALLIZED VIOLETS. 
All kinds of French Fruits, Glaces, 
Stuffed Prunes, Salted Almonds, 
Pecans and Peanuts, Violet Sachet, 
Bonbonnierres, French Bonbons, Fancy 
Chocolates, Nougatines, Marshmallow, 
Opera Caramels, etc. 



- CONFECTIONS 

OF THEIR OWN MANUFACTURE 

TO BE FOUND ANYWHERE 



FANCY CRACKERS 

OF EVERY 
DESCRIPTION. 



Also a full line of Stuffed Olives, Pim-Olas, Fancy Pickles, 
Preserves and Condiments especially adapted to Dinner and Evening Parties 



CATALOGUE FORWARDED UPON APPLICATION. 






LASELL LEAVES 



THE DAYLIGHT STORE 



provides every convenience (or satis- 
factory shopping — parlor for reading, 
writing and resting — postoffice — tele- 
graph office — safety elevators running 
to basement and upper floors — every corner thoroughly lighted and ventilated. While our effort is to bring 
an increasing number of customers each day to the various departments, yet our desire is to hav6 evkry 
PURCHASE AND the detail op every transaction so conducted by our employees that a peeling op 
entire satisfaction will accompany each sale. Ladies' Outer Garments, Corsets, Underwear and 
Shoes are proraineut everyday features of our store. 

GILCHRIST & CO. 

WINTER and WASHINGTON STREETS. 



THE NEW SCALE 

HALLETT & DAVIS 
PIANOS. 

The recognized standard of the musical world. We 
have no hesitancy in saying that our Piano as made 
today is as near a perfect instrument as is possible to 
manufacture. You should try and hear the New Scale 
Hallett & Davis if you are interested in a beautiful 
toned piano. We can surprise you in price, quality 
and tone. 

Established 60 Years. 179 TREMONT STREET. 



C. W. Davidson, Pres. 
Newtonville. 



F. F. Davidson, Treas. 
Auburndale. 



THOMAS LONG COMPANY, 

77 Summer St., Boston. 

GOLDSMITHS AND SILVERSMITHS. 

Special designs always in stock. 

Newest ideas in Jewelry, Sterling Silver, Cut Glass, 
Umbrellas and Pocket-books. 
Repairing a specialty. 
Makers of Class and Society Pins and Golf Prizes. 

Dr. W. F. HALL, 
Dentist. 

211 Central Street, Near Station, Auburndale. 

HOURS FROM 8 a. m. till 5 p. m. 

Refers by permission to many patients in this city. 

All Fillings warranted. Only the best of materials used. 

Special attention given to Crown and Bridge Work. 

H. B. Thayer 

NEWEST FASHIONS IN SHOES. 

Special discount to students. 
144 TREMONT STREET, BOSTON. 



O 



¥ 



DD THINGS. 



Brooches, 
Hat Pins* 
Buckles, 
Posters, 
Stems, 
Flags. 

387 bS!" £ S '" BENT & BUSH. 



pall, 1900. 



We take pleasure in announcing 



the completion by our "Jour" Tailors 



of the latest novelties in 



£a&ies' Suits aad £adies' doats 



which are now displayed in the beautiful 



£adies' Suit IJootti 



adjoining our Ladies' Garment Annex. 



^{. SHuman <Sf do. 



Shuman Corner, Boston. 



tASCLL ft/WES 



it 



DUX FEA\mA PACTI." 



VOL. XXVI, 



Lasell Seminary, Auburndale, Mass., October, 1900. 



Number 1 



Published monthly during the School year by the Lasell Publishing Association. 



ANNA M. PINKHAM, '02. 

Local Editor. 
RUTH M. TALCOTT. 



Editor-in-chief. 
GEORGIE M. DUNCAN, '02. 

Associate Editors. 
BESSIE Y. FULLER, '02. 

Subscription Agent. 
ETHEL M. GALLAGHER, 'oi. 



IDA M. MALLORY, '03 



Exchange Editor. 
MABEL MARTIN, '01. 



Business Manager. 
ETHLYN F. BARBER, '01. 



Asst. Business Manager. 
JOANNA F. DEERING, '02. 



TERMS, in Advance: One copy, one year (including Postage), $1.00. Single copies, 15 cents. 



ADVERTISING RATES. 



SPACE. 


3 months 


6 months 


9 months 




SPACE. 


3 months 


6 months 


9 months 


1*8 Column, .... 
1-6 " .... 
1-4 .... 


$2.00 
3.00 
4.00 


$3.75 
5.00 
6.50 


$5.00 
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9.00 


1-2 Column 

3-4 " .... 
1 " .... 


$6.50 

9.00 

12.00 


$11.00 
15.00 
19.00 


$15.00 
20.00 
25.00 



The Editors will be glad to receive from the students and Alumna any communications and items of 
interest to the school. 



Editorials. 



ONE more summer vacation has come and 
gone, and we are again settling down 
to the work of another school year. It is 
with great pleasure that we welcome the 
new girls this year, and hope that they will 
have here a very pleasant and profitable time. 
The weather this fall has been especially 
beautiful, and has made possible to us all 
many enjoyable hours of exercise and pleas- 
ure in the open air. Although we have had 
a few unpleasant days since school began, 
these have not much interferred with our 
outdoor exercise. We are glad to see that 
the new girls are making good use of the 
tennis court and golf-links. 



We realize that the new girls feel that 
"There's no place like home;" we all felt 
that way ourselves when we first came; but 
it ought to be some comfort to think how 
much more fortunate we are here than are 
those poor people in Texas and other parts 
of the world, to whom so much disaster has 
come of late. How thankful we should be 
that our homes and dear ones are spared to 
us even though we may not be permitted to 
be with them just at present. 
/Several changes in our faculty have been 
made this year. Miss Carpenter, who for 
a number of years past has taught the lit- 
erature and history classes, has added to her 



/ 



LASELL LEAVES 



duties this year, that of preceptress. Miss 
C. M. Austin assists Miss Witherbee with 
the English, and Miss Kendrick with the 
Latin, besides having charge of the library. 
She is a graduate of Smith, class of '99, and 
made a specialty of English and the classic 
languages. / Miss Edith Lynwood Winn is 
the instructor in violin, mandolin and guitar. 
She is a pupil of Julius Eichberg, of the New 
England Conservatory of Music, and in ad- 
dition to this, has studied several years un- 
der Johanne Kense, of Berlin. A woman 
of wide culture, she has won distinction in 
the various capacities of teacher, soloist, es- 
sayist, and lecturer. 

This year every girl is required to take 
chorus, which is divided into three classes, 
according to the girls' ability to read music 
— the beginners, those a little more ad- 
vanced, and those who can read readily. 
This last constitutes the Orphean Club, and 
consists of about twenty members. Mr. 
A. E. French, our teacher, was for a number 
of years instructor of music in the Boston 
public schools. Last year the chorus classes 
were not very large, as it was altogether op- 
tional, and too many of the girls neglected 
to take advantage of the fine opportunity 
given. We feel sure that the work will do 
us a great deal of good. 

Mrs. Miriam Loomis of Marietta, Ohio, 
takes this year the places of Miss Barrows, 
Mrs. Norton and Mrs. Perry, as Director 
of Household Economics. 



A Suggestive Editorial. 



INSTEAD of "boy" put "girl" in this edi- 
1 torial extract from the New York 
Christian Advocate, and it will be just as 
true: 

Choose "Chums" Carefully. 
When boys go from home to school or 
college they learn the meaning of the word 



"chum" by experience. "Girls," says a 
writer, "are more 'chummy' than boys." 
Perhaps they are; at least they are likely to 
spend more time indoors than boys, and so 
may be together more. But when a boy 
really likes his chum they may be as happy 
as any girls can be, and help each other as 
much. The best friendships in life often 
start in this way and last till death. 

This is the bright side of the picture. 

Sometimes there is a dark side; — black 
as a starless midnight. 

Many a boy has been ruined by his room- 
mate. We could tell some truthful and aw- 
ful tales of what we saw in boarding school 
and college, but it is not necessary, for simi- 
lar things are going on all the time. Last 
week four of a gang of the worst criminals 
in this country were arrested, and are now in 
prison. One of them has been a banker and 
a State senator, and was once reputed to be 
wealthy; but for many years he has been a 
swindler, robbing, forging. This man and 
another arrested with him were "chums in 
college," and were known then as gamblers. 
It is probable that one led the other astray, 
and it is possible that if one had been a firm, 
moral, Christian young man the other might 
have been led into the right path. Choose 
your chums with care; drop your best friend 
if you find him morally rotten, and drop him 
at once. 

These two men belonged to the best fam- 
ilies, and had the finest chance to do well in 
the world. 

Choose your acquaintances and, above all, 
your chums with care, and avoid those 
whom on further acquaintance you find un- 
worthy. No other way is safe. 



The sorrow of yesterday is as nothing; 
that of to-day is bearable; but that of to- 
morrow is gigantic, because indistinct. — 
Euripides. 



LASELL LEAVES - 



Queen Louise. 



THE name Queen Louise, and the picture 
of a very beautiful woman descend- 
ing a staircase, are closely associated in the 
thoughts of most of us school-girls, because 
somewhere in our rooms, on wall or dresser 
or in art album, we have this picture, which 
we count one of our treasures. There may 
be other pictures of this royal beauty, but 
this of Rechter's is best known and most ad- 
mired. For this reason, some account of 
this noble woman may be of interest. 

Louise of Prussia was born in 1776. Her 
early training was received from very pious 
and conscientious people, and thus acquired 
a certain religious tone, and it was, further- 
more, for the most part carried on in French 
instead of in German, for which she ex- 
pressed a regret in after years. Her gener- 
osity and loving thoughtfulness for others, 
a life-long characteristic, was evident when 
she was but a child. One day when out 
walking, she gave all her money to a poor 
widow, who begged for bread for her starv- 
ing children, and at another time she was 
found reading to the sick child of one of the 
castle servants. 

At the age of seventeen, Louise met the 
Crown Prince of Prussia, to whom not long 
after, she was married. The Princess 
much preferred the quiet of home life to the 
court, and was never so happy as when look- 
ing after her husband's comfort, in the fash- 
ion of a true German housewife. She had 
three children, two sons and a daughter, to 
whom she was devoted, and gave a great 
share of her time and attention. When the 
Prince ascended the throne at his father's 
death, she left her quiet life for the more 
public one of the court with regret. One 
thing about her new position that pleased 
her, however, was the fact that now she 
could give as much to the poor as she wished. 



Up to the time of Napoleon's evil as- 
cendency, the Queen's life was a happy one, 
but now Prussia was drawn into her disas- 
terous war with France. The King, of 
course, had to go to the front; her people 
were in dire distress, which she was unable 
to relieve; and the news of defeat came 
daily to her ears. When negotiations for 
peace were being made, Napoleon requested 
an interview with the Queen, who strongly 
impressed him with her beauty and her royal 
bearing, but was unable to influence him suf- 
ficiently to make the terms of peace more fa- 
vorable for Prussia. 

The death of the Queen occurred in 18 10 
at her father's home. It was like her gentle 
nature, that during her illness, she should re- 
gret the anxiety she caused her relatives. 
She was but thirty-four when she died, yet 
all Prussia mourned the death of the good 
and beautiful Queen. Her gracious in- 
fluence long survived her in the hearts of 
her people. She cherished to her dying 
day the hope that Germany would one day 
be a united people, and it seems a pity she 
was not allowed to see the establishment of 
that German unity she so much desired, or 
to know that her own sons it was who were 
eventually to fulfill, this, her dearest hope. 

♦ m 

Loving Words. 

Loving words will cost but little, 
Journeying up the 'hill of life; 
But they make the weak and weary 
Stronger, braver for the strife. 
Do you count them only trifles? 
What to earth are sun and rain? 
Never was a kind word wasted; 
Never one was said in vain. 



— Anon. 



He only can enrich me who can recom- 
mend to me the space between sun and sun. 
— Emerson. 



Habit is habit, and not to be flung out of 
the window by any man, but coaxed down 
stairs a step at a time. — Mark Twain. 



6 LASELL LEAVES 

The Modern Department Store. any position in the store; makes the rules 
for the employees; sees to the special sales; 

IT is only within the last few years that and approves the choice of the buyers, 
the large city department stores have The heads of each department, the floor- 
existed. Until Mr. Macy of New York walkers, are next in importance. They see 
conceived the idea of having numerous de- that the articles in their departments are at- 
partments under one roof, instead of under tractively arranged; that the clerks obey the 
twenty, the city store had in general some rules; that the customers are promptly 
one special line of goods which it sold to the waited on ; and that the shoppers who go for 
exclusion of all else. But in the depart- information, or to make complaints, are at- 
ment store of today you can find almost tended to in either case, 
every desired luxury and necessity. Here Then comes the army of clerks. In all 
you can completely furnish your house, from the best department stores, the clerks are 
cellar to attic ; can buy even the books for required to be respectful and obliging to cus- 
the library, as well as the kitchen utensils tomers; they must be neat in appearance, 
and groceries ; can stock your wardrobe ex- too, and it is generally required of them to 
travagantly or otherwise; can purchase your dress in black. There seems to be no pre- 
bicycle, and indeed, any kind of outfit for ference in respect of sex, both men and wo- 
out-door sport; and when wearied by shop- men being employed. In order that the 
ping, can take your luncheon at the cafe on stores may be able to employ the nicer class 
the tenth floor, or in the Japanese tea-room, of clerks, they must treat them with respect 
If you wish you can rest in the ladies' wait- and consideration. Wanamaker has erected 
ing room, read the new magazines, or write for his clerks a compartment house, which is 
your letters. You can also have your hair built with regard to comfort, health, and 
dressed in the latest fashion by expert hair- economy. Another large store has pro- 
dressers, or your nails manicured. vided a cafe where the employees may eat 
The shopper little realizes how gigantic is their luncheon, paying only the actual cost 
the organization, and how complex the sys- of the provisions. Most stores encourage 
tern necessary to run this immense store, the their clerks to form reading clubs, or other 
management which delivers her purchases at societies, in which they may become better 
her home before she arrives; or how perfect acquainted with one another, 
service must be in order to prevent anyone The next on the list of employees are the 
of the hundreds of packages daily sent out cash boys and girls. If a store employes 
from being lost, or left at the wrong place, only cash boys, they are generally required 
Under Wanamaker's immense roof are to dress in uniform; but if girls also are em- 
over two thousand employees. The firm, ployed, uniforms are not used. The cash 
the gentlemen who own the store, have not boys must be quiet and quick in fulfilling 
only to sit in their office and receive the their duties. In most stores electric bells 
profits; they must know how the business is are used to call the "cash," and are less try- 
progressing; how each department is work- ing and disagreeable than the rasping call 
ing, and must approve the special sales, of "cash !" by the clerks. 
Their chief assistant, the superintendent, Part of the basement floor is used in some 
who is in charge of all the departments, re- stores for the crockery department, the 
ceives the applications of all those desiring groceries, and sometimes for the cheaper 



LASELL LEAVES 



articles of dress goods; but there is one 
division not open to the public, and that is 
where the packages are brought from all 
parts of the store, sorted for delivery ac- 
cording to the different parts of the city 
where they are to go, and taken away by 
the delivery wagons. Every driver has his 
special route which he always follows. 

Another department not accessible to the 
public, is that where the buyers are sta- 
tioned. There they interview drummers 
and examine samples. These buyers have 
control over the purchase of articles for the 
store, subject, of course, to the approval of 
the superintendent, and they must see well 
to the quality and assortment of the goods 
for the department which is in their hands. 
Every department has a special buyer, but 
there is generally more than one buyer for 
each department, one traveling abroad, an- 
other traveling in this country, and still 
another remaining at the store to meet the 
drummers who come there. Even the no- 
tion counter has its buyer who, when he sees 
any taking new invention in hair-pins, say, 
must find the best maker of these, and pur- 
chase a supply. There seems to be no 
choice as to whether the buyers should be 
men or women, indeed women are consid- 
ered better in some departments. 

In the ready-made clothing department 
models are usually employed, whose whole 
duty is to try on the garments so that the 
prospective buyer may see for herself how 
others would see her in that particular robe. 
These models must look stylish in any gar- 
ment, be it ball dress, walking suit, or bi- 
cycle skirt; consequently they must possess 
that indefinable thing called "style," or they 
could never show off these dresses to ad- 
vantage. There are also dressing rooms, 
with courteous attendants, where ladies 
from out of the city can dress for reception 
or ball. 



During the holidays, the stores are taste- 
fully decorated as a means of advertisement. 
Each firm has its own opinion as to the best 
means of advertising. Most stores try to 
attract public attention by their beautifully 
decorated windows, but the windows of 
some stores are more artistically decorated 
than others; the store which should not 
decorate windows would be considered far 
behind the times, so that it behooves the 
stores to decorate in some way or other. It 
is the decorated windows that show the pre- 
vailing fashion in the making of dresses, as 
well as the fashion in dress goods for the 
present and the coming season. 

During the Christmas holidays, the win- 
dows are filled with Christmas bargains and 
toys for the children, and the store which 
Santa Claus honors with his presence is the 
children's favorite. At Easter time the win- 
dows are filled with Easter bonnets and 
dresses, of which the prevailing color is 
violet. Another store, perhaps, expects its 
immense advertisements in the morning pa- 
pers, to attract shoppers. 

Department stores are of much greater 
advantage, in various ways, than the type of 
store in which but one sort of goods is kept, 
or a small variety of commodities. To the 
beauty and imposing effect of the business 
portion of the city, for example, these large 
and handsome buildings add greatly. Their 
exquisite window displays of attractive 
goods draw many customers from places 
outside the city, as well as from the city it- 
self; hence large sums of money are realized 
because of the greatness of the tide of cus- 
tom. This brings more business to the city 
at large, as may easily be seen, and thus 
materially contributes to its prosperity. 
Moreover, in the purchasing of such great 
amounts of various kinds of goods, as must 
be got to replenish the stock of so large a 
business, large discounts are made so that it 



8 



LASELL LEAVES 



is possible for the firm to sell them cheaper, 
and yet make a fair profit, which is of direct 
advantage to the shopper, and equally so to 
the manufacturer. Since, then, these large 
establishments are of such decided ad- 
vantage and profit to manufacturer, the 
firm, and the shopper, is it not idle and un- 
called for to cry them down as is the fashion 
with a certain class of people ? L. K. W. 




PERSONALS. 

— Mr. Bragdon attended the Smith Col- 
lege celebration of its twenty-fifth anniver- 
sary, at Northampton, October first and 
second, and much enjoyed being present at 
the interesting exercises of that occasion. 

— It will interest Lasell pupils to know 
that the great grandmother of our new 
teacher, Mr. French, was Laura, sister of 
Benjamin Franklin. Mr. French has been 
much employed in public school work, and is 
now in charge of the singing in the schools 
of Dover, N. H. 

— Kittie Totman Brownell of old days, 
sends an interesting letter. The destruc- 
tive tidal wave that destroyed so much life 
and property at Galveston, did not reach La- 
Porte, where she lives, and the town was but 
slightly damaged by wind. This is good 
news. 

— Mr. Stowe of Galveston, father of Wil- 
lie and Virginia, writes of the dreadful work 
of clearing away the debris of the flood, dis- 
posing of the bodies of the poor unfortunates 
found, and of the great business losses suf- 



fered by so many in the city, himself one. 
His home, and that of Virginia and her 
family, next door, withstood the storm, 
though put to an awful test. Virginia and 
her children are at present away from the 
city, as is Willie, also. None of their re- 
latives were lost in the great disaster. 

— Mary Roberts and Agnes Batchelder 
Wylie, with her husband, called in July. 

— Margie Schuberth and Blanche Kelley, 
('96), made us a short visit. 

— Nellie Briggs of Somerville drove over 
with her father. 

— Among others who have recently called 
are: Cara Sawin, ('96), Troy, N. Y. ; Mary 
B. Cruikshank, ('96), Newton, Mass.; Elsie 
Burdick, ('99), Hartford, Conn.; Alice 
Conant, Camden, N. Y.; Helen Ramsdell, 
Coo), Woburn; Bertha Metcalf, Plainville; 
Elise Scott, ('99), Chestnut Hill; Elsie Rey- 
nolds, ('00), E. Haddam, Conn.; Ella B. 
Cotton, ('00), Omaha, Neb. 

—Mr. A. F. Miller of Fremont, Ohio, 
father of our Julia Miller, made us a too 
brief call. 

— Rosa Best of Maiden gave us a delight- 
ful call the other day. 

— Belle Bragdon, '95, reports the follow- 
ing notes of her Omaha visit on her way 
east from Pasadena. Mr. and Mrs. Brag- 
don returned via Canadian Pacific R. R., as 
his notes elsewhere tell. 

— Mabel Taylor, ('95,) is happy in her 
new home at Omaha. Grace Allen, ('95), 
and Elizabeth Allen, ('98), as well as Mabel 
Taylor, are "golf girls," and spend much 
time at the beautiful Omaha Country Club, 
of which they are all members. Elizabeth 
still keeps up her violin a bit. 

— Martha Stone Adams is living with her 
parents since her husband is travelling so 
much of the time. 

— Ella Cotton, ('00), is enjoying herself 
at the "Country Club and everywhere.'' 



LASELL LEAVES 



— Margie Schuberth, ('96), spent a few 
days last August at Wilmington, Vermont, 
where Gertrude Clarke, ('97), Dorothy 
Manning, ('95), and Miss Newton of Hol- 
yoke, were keeping house during August 
and September. 

— Dorothy Manning has been East the 
greater part of the summer, visiting Blanche 
Kelley, ('96), Gertrude Clarke, and friends 
in Holyoke and Nantucket. She starts for 
Dayton, O., about the first of October. 

— Nell Quirk, ('97), spent a while with 
Gertrude Clarke before returning to her 
home in Minneapolis, Minn. 

— Rose Best is keeping house for her 
father and mother at Linden, a suburb of 
Maiden, Mass. 

— Belle Bragdon has gone to New York 
to take a course of convalescent nursing. 

■ — We hear thro' a new pupil that Alice 
Conant has developed a very sweet and cap- 
able voice. Glad. 

— Laura Conger, the daughter of the 
United States Minister to China, is our 
Laura Conger, and has been through the 
siege with her father and mother in Pekin. 
Mr. Bragdon saw her last in Pasadena in 
the spring of '99. 

— The opening of school this fall brought 
a gratifying number of our old friends to see 
us once more, and though by force of cir- 
cumstances their stay was all too short, it 
was none the less a pleasure to have them 
with us again. Elizabeth Kiser Irwin, 
C77), came from Keokuk, la., to bring us 
her two pleasant daughters; Lucy Curtis, of 
Rockland, came with her niece, and Myrtle 
Hewson, her sister, Lotta. Of our new pu- 
pils Edith Sisson is Maritta Sisson's sister, 
and Charlotte Massey is the daughter of 
Belle Jones Massey. Clara Robbins was 
here awhile when school began, to help 
launch the new girls comfortably — nice of 
her to do so. 



— Carita Curtis sent us word of herself in 
a pleasant August letter. She was at New 
Rochelle, N. Y., with her mother and sister, 
and Mrs. Avery, a friend of her sister's. 
She was having, of course, a delightful time, 
and spoke, furthermore, of the pleasure she 
had here with us at Commencement time. 
She mentions Ethel Smith as a loyal Lasell 
daughter, which Carita herself claims also 
to be. Ethel is with her sick brother, she 
says, making his life brighter. There is a 
plan afoot for a great reunion of Lasell girls 
in Omaha this coming year. Evelyn Ebert 
was expected shortly, at the time Carita 
wrote, for a day's visit, being only so far 
away as Glen Ridge. Besides these pleas- 
ures, she mentions a class in literature each 
morning. Truly, her summer must have 
been very pleasantly spent. 

— From Alice Fuller was received, in 
June, an invitation to her Commencement 
exercises at Pratt Institute. 

— Among our summer callers was Mrs. 
Henry B. Glover, mother of our Carrie, of 
loved memory. 

— The advertising agent of the Boston 
Transcript, Mr. William F. Rogers, is the 
husband of our Mabel Sawyer Rogers, 

C95). 

— Maudie L. Stone, ('88), brought her 

friend, Miss Gridley, a teacher of art at Em- 
poria, out to Lasell to spend a Sunday in 
July. Maudie was taking work in the Sum- 
mer school, and wished Miss Gridley to meet 
Mr. Bragdon, see Lasell, and enjoy the 
pictures here. 

— Clara Eads, ('93), speaks a good word 
for Nell Jones, with us this year, and a dear 
friend of hers. In May and June Clara 
visited Harriet and Alice Noble, and from 
their home went to her brother's college 
graduation. Besides this, she speaks, too, 
of a delightful visit to friends in Garland 
Dell, Indiana. 



10 



LASELL LEAVES 



— Edith Bailey, ('oo), says some pleas- 
ant things about Caroline LeSeure who is 
now one of us, Edith has a new address : 
205 High street. 

■ — Among our summer visitors were our 
new pupil, Miss Maud Campbell, her mother 
and younger sister, from San Jose, Califor- 
nia, who are trying the virtues of the Atlan- 
tic coast. 

— Principal Bragdon's brother, George E. 
Bragdon of Pueblo, Colo., was much urged 
to accept the Republican nomination for 
Lieut. Governor of that state, but steadfast- 
ly refused. The Bragdon's don't "take to" 
politics, as a livelihood. 

— "I saw the Fowler girls, Delia, Etta 
and Nora. Delia has a new baby girl, 
which is 'the only baby.' Delia and Etta 
are so well they each refuse to be weighed." 
So writes Katie Gibbons Ashenden, who 
came from Texas to have Dr. Will Haskell 
mend her eyes (when did Katie's eyes ever 
look as if they needed mending?) and of 
course called at Lasell. She reports Mr. 
Ashenden as making a fine place for himself 
in Dallas, as voice teacher and singer. We 
all knew he would. 

— Flo. Gardner, ('93), has spent most 

of her time since graduation in traveling. 
Her sisters, Al and Lucie, she says, are very 
happy in their homes. The former has two 
children, eight and four, respectively, and 
Lucie one, almost three now. Nellie Davis's, 
('93), father, she tells us, is dead. Nellie 
is very sad and lonely, and finds it hard to 
rally from so severe a blow. Anna Staley, 
('92), who was to have been married to Sue 
Richards' ('91), brother in June, has also 
met with deep sorrow. Mr. Richards was 
taken suddenly ill, and died before Anna 
could reach him. Ava Rawleigh is hap- 
pily married, and has a dear little home. 
The Rowe girls, Alice Piatt Durand and 

Bess Crawford Hawxhurst are all in Evan- 
ston. 



— Laura Conger, here some years ago, is 
the daughter of Minister Conger at Pekin, 
about whom there has been so much said re- 
cently, because of the Chinese troubles, and 
the imminent peril of the foreigners in that 
city. 

— Helen Ramsdell's, ('00), father wrote 
us in August, that Helen's health was all 
right now. They had just returned from a 
Canadian trip. Since then Helen has been 
here to see us, and be her own evidence that 
she is no longer ailing. We are glad. 

— Lina Morgan Jones, whose stay with 
us was cut short by illness, writes us after 
the lapse of twenty years, and tells us of her 
self and experiences since then. Like so 
many others, she has lost the dear father and 
mother; two brothers also have gone on be- 
fore. She is married, and has a fifteen year 
old boy. ■ Not long since, she had a visit 
from Lottie Snell Simms, ('82), who has 
three children, and lives in Herkimer, N. Y. 
She mentions especially, of the teachers, 
Miss Carpenter and Miss Blaisdell. 

— Martha Ladd Burton sends new ad- 
dress: 271 No. Willow street, Waterbury, 
Conn. 

— Georgie Lord sends best wishes for the 
new school year. Thanks. 

— Ella Huestis, we hear, enters Smith 
this year. Our best wishes to her. We 
heard from her once during vacation. 

— Julia Cox adds her good wishes for the 
coming year, to those of other good friends. 
She was ill during the summer, she says, 
wherefore she cannot return to us this fall. 
We wish her speedy and complete recovery. 

— A newspaper clipping of more than or- 
dinary interest to us tells us, that Annie 
Kirkwood, here in ('85), has gained for her- 
self a very comfortable business position as 
a life insurance agent, though the early 
stages of her work were beset by difficulties. 
Her courage and resolution, however, to- 



LASELL LEAVES 



ii 



gether with perseverance and devotion to 
business, won the battle and gave her a sig- 
nal victory. We rejoice in her success. 

— Annie Young's, ('97), father wrote us, 
recently, that Annie had been seriously ill 
during the summer, though when he wrote 
she was well again, and enjoying her trip to 
Colorado with him. They expected to re- 
turn east at about the last of this month. 

— Sara Bond Goldsmith, ('95), of whose 
recent sorrow another column tells, gives 
128 Commonwealth avenue as her per- 
manent home address. Just now she is in 
Denver, with her sister-in-law, expecting to 
spend the winter there. 

— That Emma C. Hackett, Jennie Lyons 
and Julia A. Norris, in the Woman's Medi- 
cal School, Northwestern University, re- 
ceived honorable mention on the occasion of 
the June graduation of students from that 
institution, is the welcome news brought us 
by a little clipping from the Chicago Tri- 
bune of June 15. 

— The grief occasioned Mabel Case Viot, 
('94), by the loss of her mother in the sum- 
mer, was cruelly aggravated, by the fact that 
she was unable to reach home before her 
mother's death. Mabel and Mr. Viot had 
gone to Europe on their wedding trip, and 
in Switzerland, received news of Mrs. Case's 
dangerous illness. A second cable message 
received in England gave hope of her re- 
covery, but this was presently followed by a 
third announcing the fatal termination of 
her illness, on receiving which the young 
couple immediately sailed for home. How 
sadly different the return from the de- 
parture ! Mrs. Case was a lady of marked 
social and intellectual gifts, and was greatly 
esteemed in Highland Park, where she was 
a prominent figure in social and church cir- 
cles. 

— Sue Brown Brill, (88), and her hus- 
band, called to see Mr. Bragdon during the 



summer. Sue seemed to thrive on married 
life, he says. 

— Mrs. Dr. Bragdon of Evanston (our 
Principal's brother Mett's wife), and her 
children, Carl and Sarah F., were here dur- 
ing the summer. 

— Hazel North brings us welcome news 
of Beulah Smith, who has just returned 
from an enjoyable European trip. Beulah 
is well, and gives a glowing report of her 
summer's pleasure. 

— Myrtle Davis, ('97), so one of her 
friends tells us, is to be married in October 
to a gentleman from Boston, Mr. Durell 
Gage. 

— Roe Porter, ('00), writes that her 
family expect to move to Detroit for the fol- 
lowing school year, her sister expecting to 
continue her lessons on the violin, and Roe 
to study piano and art. 

— Lena Josselyn, ('97), writes, "We are 
all busy getting ready for Marion's wedding 
in October. Katharine Bucknum, ('96) is 
coming on to be one of her bridesmaids. 
Marion and her husband will live in Bos- 
ton." Grace Ordway, it appears, is a cousin 
to this gentleman, Mr. Young. Mary 
Johnson Whitney, ('98), she says, likes St. 
Louis very much. Alice Burnham Carpen- 
ter, ('98), is very proud of her dear little 
girl. Lena's engagement to Mr. Frank 
Lamson was announced sometime during the 
summer. She encloses in her letter a pro- 
gram of her club, the Nineteenth Century 
Club. It is a well chosen one, and has 
been given an artistic form in this tasteful, 
little pamphlet. 

— Nora Burroughs, ('97), we regret to 
hear, has had a trying experience ; La Grippe 
last January, a relapse, and ever since that a 
long, slow struggle back to health. She 
spent her summer in the North, endeavoring 
to regain lost ground, and at the end of it 
was feeling very much improved, indeed. 



12 



LASELL LEAVES 



We hope she is quite well again by now. 
She visited Lucia Shumway Suffel, ('97), 
for awhile, "the same dear Lucia, as of old," 
and while there saw Fan Fairchild, who 
"looks ten years younger than when at La- 
sell," and Flo Joannes, also. At Madison, 
Wis., Nora met Ellen Sanborn and Marie 
Griswold. She had had Paris letters from 
Grace Washburn, who was one of Mr. 
Shepherd's European party in the summer. 
Julia Aldrich, who she tells us, is to be mar- 
ried in October, gave a tea to her prospective 
bridesmaids in May, and Nora was present, 
meeting there Annie Young. Annie, who 
as we all know, is a literary person these 
days, makes children's stories her specialty, 
and seems to be doing well at this work. 

— Julia Anderson writes, September 21, 
that she is again in the hospital, which we 
are sorry, indeed, to hear of her. She 
speaks of her sister's little daughter, born in 
July; and of Myrna Lamson, who has grown 
stouter since we saw her. Julia thinks her 
greatly improved. 

— We were all so glad to see Evie Harris 
the other day. She, and a cousin of hers, 
came in towards evening, partly, as Evie 
confessed, because she greatly wished to be 
present at evening chapel again, and she felt 
rather disappointed that our newly arranged 
hours put chapel at noon on school days, in- 
stead of in the evening. She was looking 
exceedingly well, and evidently felt as well 
as she looked. Through her we learned, to 
our deep regret, of the recent death of one 
of Bessie Risser's brothers. Bessie and her 
sister were expecting to enter Smith this fall, 
but this sad occurrence may cause a change 
of plan. 

— Theodora Bratten, too, came from Bel- 
mont, where she now is, with her mother, to 
see us one day during the last week of Sep- 
tember. She is pushing on her preparation 
for Tech, and looks well and hearty. Had 



a fine summer, part of which she spent in 
study. 

— Ella Ampt expects to be married in Oc- 
tober, we hear, to Dr. Hamann, a surgeon, 
professor of anatomy in Western Reserve 
University, and on the staff at several hos- 
pitals. They are to live in Cleveland — "on 
Prospect St.," she says. 

— Lester Hibberd Saxton writes that at 
her wedding Ella Wilson, Marie, Edith 
Blair, and Katherine McDowell were brides- 
maids; that she has not yet gone to house- 
keeping, Mr. Saxton's business necessitating 
much travel, which for the present she is 
sharing with him; that her address is still 
Richmond, and that she saw Julia Ham- 
mond in Chicago, and learned that Elizabeth 
Stephenson had been visiting her but a short 
time before. 

— Josephine West tells of a call from Mr. 
Ryder, formerly art teacher here, with 
whom she enjoyed a chat about Lasell. Her 
brother was home all summer, and they had 
a fine time together. 

■ — Several of our old girls have sent in 
their subscription to the Leaves for this 
year. More should do so, it seems to us, if 
they are at all interested in the doings and 
happenings at Lasell, and in their old mates 
of whom the Personals have much to say. 

— Mrs. Symns, Efne's mother, whose re- 
cent death is noticed elsewhere in this issue, 
was greatly respected and beloved in the 
community where she lived, and her death 
is felt as a personal loss by many not con- 
nected with the family by any ties of rela- 
tionship. Her funeral services were at- 
tended by a noticeably large gathering, and 
in this and other ways proved how strong a 
hold she had upon those among whom she 
had lived. 

— Our Dorothy Manning ('95) and Ger- 
trude Clarke ('97) called one day not long 



LASELL LEAVES 



13 



ago, for about ten minutes — all they thought 
Lasell deserved ( ?) 

— Florence Ray, ('96), we hear, is to be 
Belle Bronson's only bridesmaid — the wed- 
ding is to be a quiet one. Dorothy Man- 
ning is to visit Florence, and will likely be 
there for the wedding. 

— Elsie Doepke is soon to be married. 
Her father is building her a pretty house in 
Mt. Auburn, near Cincinnati. 

— Clara Lewis was visiting Worcester 
during the Music Festival. Blanche Kel- 
ley ('96) and Margie Schuberth ('96) saw 
and spoke with her frequently. They also 
saw Irene Wellington recently. 

— Katherine Mason has been at home the 
greater part of the time since last March, 
with her father and mother. Her brother 
and sister are away this year. She writes 
of finding content and happiness in her home 
life, although at first she missed the society 
of other young people, having at school had 
so many of these about her. 

— A most welcome, tho' too brief, call was 
made in October by Frances Barbour Sonn- 
tag, who now lives in Buena Park, 111., near 
Lulu Orrell Eddy. She still sings and much 
regretted not seeing Prof. Davis, to whom 
she acknowledges herself in large debt. 

— Mile. Le Royer reports a fairly pleasant 
trip across the ocean in June. While they 
were in Paris, she and Joe Milliken saw Fan 
White. Fan was on top of an omnibus, as 
were also our travelers, so that all they could 
do was merely to greet each other as they 
passed. They did not meet again, and 
consequently had no chance to exchange ex- 
periences for our benefit in these columns. 

— Through Nelly Packard Draper ('84) 
who had a day's visit in July from Gussie 
Lowe Brownback ('84), we learn that the 
latter is living in the old Lowe homestead 
in Norristown, and that Blanche ('87) and 
her family, and Ava's husband and children 



live near. Gussie's husband and two boys 
were in Boston at the time of her visit to 
Mrs. Draper. It has been thirteen years 
since these two old schoolmates had seen 
each other. 

— A nice letter from June Hoyt Waite, 
now living in Seattle. Her little boy is 
five and a half years old, and his mother's 
joy. June had a call some time since from 
Ruth Sankey Ripley. 

— Nellie Carnahan, here in ('95), wrote a 
good letter from Superior, Wis., where she 
was visiting her sister. She expects to enter 
the State Normal School next fall. 

— Katherine White (1900) has had a 
very pleasant summer at home, "trying to 
be useful," and succeeding admirably, we 
feel sure, knowing her as we do. She 
sends her dollar for Leave's subscription, 
and adds sundry items of interest to readers 
of the Personals. Alice Ashley, ('00), vis- 
ited during the summer both Mabel Martin 
and Mabel Coffin, the latter of whom has 
now gone to Europe for the winter. Avila 
Grubbs ('99) and her mother have had a 
delightful summer abroad, traveling through 
France, Switzerland, and Germany. Annie 
Ives has been enjoying the summer delights 
of the seashore, camping out in a cottage at 
Branford, Conn. Mary Houghton ('00) 
made her a visit there in July. Alice Jenckes 
('99) has had several fine trips on board 
their yacht "Millie." They took a cruise 
of several weeks up Long Island Sound. 
When at Watch Hill, R. I., they took Ruth 
Talcott aboard for a trip, which was a great 
pleasure to both girls. Alice Ashley, Agnes 
Flaherty, and Mabel Stilson were with 
"Peggie" for several weeks after the close of 
school. Emily Kothe ('00) spent her sum- 
mer at Lake Maxinkuckee, in Northern In- 
diana, boating, swimming, and sailing to her 
heart's content. Louise Gurley spent part 
of August with Katherine. — Thanks, Kath- 



14 



LASELL LEAVES 



erine ! That 's a fine budget of news. 

— Mabel Englehart Dudley sends for our 
Album a picture of her cute little daughter, 
Mabel Irene Dudley, a year old in April, we 
believe. Her mother assures us that wee 
Irene is one of the best and sweetest of 
babies, and indeed she looks it. The family 
spent part of the summer with Mabel's peo- 
ple in East Orange, N. J. Mabel speaks of 
seeing very often Bessie Prescott White, 
and wonders what has become of Margaret 
Coon Brown, who, when last she had news 
of her, was living in Oak Park, Illinois. 

— Mary Smith writes of a pleasant visit, 
after school closed, at Belle Robinson's 
home; and of another no less pleasant when 
Belle spent some seven weeks with her in 
her Virginia home. She had seen the Hub- 
bard girls a short time previous to the date 
of her letter, and had a long Lasell chat with 
them. They are well. 

— Louise Peycke tells us of a visit made 
by Flora Taft to Janette Knights, and of a 
prospective one that she and Flora were each 
expecting from Janette shortly. She saw 
Helen Harris and Ella Cotton in Omaha 
during the summer, and also Alice Andree- 
sen Kountze, whose home has recently been 
brightened by the advent of a little boy. 

— Rena Fellows' ('99) engagement to 
Mr. Frank Drummond Hight, of Bangor, 
was announced not long since. Rena spent 
nearly all her summer at home. Florence 
Pooler and Maude Mayo, ('98), paid her 
each a visit, and at the time she wrote she 
was expecting visits from Gertrude May and 
Alice Conant. She had, furthermore, heard 
several times directly from Avila Grubbs, 
who was enjoying the summer exceedingly. 
Of Francis Allen ('99) she had heard 
through Bangor acquaintances who visit at 
the place where Frances spends her sum- 
mers. 

— Emma Goll Dacy ('98), whose sad loss 



in the death of her dear mother is elsewhere 
noticed in this issue, writes of the circum- 
stances attending Mrs. Goll's last illness. 
Blanche and George were with her, and Mr. 
Dacy. The other brother is already a busi- 
ness man on his own account and doing well. 
Their mother's death was a severe shock to 
them, following as it did so soon upon her 
being taken ill. 

— Carrie Manning Dexter ('95) sends 
best wishes for a good school year. So like 
her kindly thoughtfulness ! 

— Florence Ray ('96) has had an ideally 
pleasant European trip. Was gone five 
months and a half, and found everything 
delightful, even to "a smooth passage home 
with six meals a day and never a minute's 
illness." She chanced to find Bess Shep- 
herd aboard and enjoyed several good Lasell 
chats with her. She was looking forward 
at the time of her letter to a visit from Belle, 
who is to be married early in October. Flor- 
ence promises us a visit when next she comes 
to Boston. We shall be glad to see her. 

— Josephine Steel Warrens sends cunning 
snapshot of her small mannie, who in his 
long trousers looks the "middy" to perfec- 
tion. The dear little mite! 



MARRIAGES. 

— Sadie Everlyn Eldredge to George 
Harris Wilder, on Wednesday, October 24, 
at Portsmouth, New Hampshire. Home 
address, after January 1 : The Cascade, 
corner Central Park, West, and 87th street, 
New York, N. Y. 

— Clara Slade Cameron to Benjamin 
Bray ton Read, Jr., on Wednesday, October 
24, at Fall River, Mass. Home address, 
after Feburary 1 : 707 Highland avenue, 
Fall River, Mass. 

— Katharine Morgan to Gilbert Pomeroy 
Drew, on Tuesday, June 19, at Oshkosh, 
Wisconsin. Their address: The Hotel 
Palms, Los Angeles, Cal. 



LASELL LEAVES 



IS 



— Mary Whitmore Peck to Thomas Wal- 
ter Butcher, on Tuesday, July 3, at Welling- 
ton, Kan. 

— Ellen Almeda Chase to Edwin Willis 
Rich, on Thursday, July 15, Dedham, Mass. 

— Lottie Appel to Samuel W. Levey, on 
Tuesday, July 31, Denver, Colo. Their ad- 
dress : 169 N. 93d street, N. Y. City. 

— Emily Angell Eaton to Orville Verner 
Thomas, on Wednesday, August 1, Denver, 
Colo. Address: 125^ South Broadway, 
Denver. 

— Edith May Nickerson to Louis Stan- 
hope Brigham, on Wednesday, August 8, 
at Newton Highlands, Mass. Address, 
after November 1 : 56 Hartford street, 
Newton Highlands. 

— Lestra Morrisson Hibberd, ('96), to 
Samuel Stanker Saxton, on Wednesday, 
August 8, Richmond, Indiana. 

— Eva Lillian Ferris to George Franklin 
Foote, Wednesday, September 5, So. Nor- 
walk, Conn. Address, after November 1 : 
6 Taylor avenue, So. Norwalk, Conn. 

— Margaret C. Duncan to Chester H. Al- 
drich, Saturday, September 15, Lowell, 
Mass. 

— Helene Kate Little to Harry Mayo 
Peck, on Wednesday, October 3, Glens 
Falls, N. Y. 

— Louise Thatcher to James Elmer Ayres, 
on Wednesday, October 3, Bennington, Ver- 
mont. Home address, after December 1 : 
19 Park avenue, Oneida, N. Y. 

— Isabel Editha Bronson, ('96), to 
Robert Angus Alister Johnston, on Wednes- 
day, October 10, Ottawa, Ontario. 

— Edith Howe, ('97), to Irving DeFor- 
est Kip, on Friday, October 12, Passaic, N. 
J. Address, after November 15: 194 Pen- 
nington avenue, Passaic, N. J. 

— Mary Bourne Hathaway, ('88), to 
Onsville Macpherson Farnham, on Wednes- 
day, August 29, New Bedford, Mass. Their 



address is 11 Kearsage street, Roxbury, 
Mass. 

— Laura Chapman to Lewis Nostrand 
Anderson, on Wednesday, October 17, El- 
mira, N. Y. Address, after December 1 : 
513 Bedford avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

— Julia Ann Aldrich to Robert Thompson 
Williams, on Wednesday, October 17, St. 
Louis, Mo. Home address: 510 Whittier 
street, St. Louis. 

— Marion Ednah Josselyn to Charles 
Nicholas Young, on Wednesday, October 
24, at Manchester, N. H. 




L0CAL5 



September 11. — All day Tuesday came 
the new girls, some with their parents, some 
with old girls, and others alone. Most of 
them spent the afternoon and evening in be- 
ing registered, meeting their room-mates, 
and planning the fitting up of their rooms; 
a few of the more fortunate ones were en- 
gaged in unpacking their trunks, while oth- 
ers were interested in looking about the 
place, which was to be their home for so 
many months. Welcome to you, new girls ! 



i6 



LASELL LEAVES 



We old girls hope you will enjoy Lasell as 
much as we have. 

September 12. — How good it was to see 
our last year's friends come flocking in, all 
apearing so glad to be back; but we missed 
from among them many faces that were 
dear, and longed for the girls who would not 
be with us again this year. In the evening 
a Boston orchestra played during the dinner 
hour, and afterwards in the gymnasium, 
where there was dancing until nine o'clock. 

September 13. — All the classes met as 
usual during the day, and in the evening 
Col. H. B. Sprague lectured on Shakes- 
peare's "Julius Caesar." Those who heard 
him give "Macbeth" last year were pleased 
with the opportunity of listening to him 
again, and enjoyed this play equally well. 

September 15. — During the Saturday af- 
ternoon lecture Miss Carpenter invited the 
new girls to a reception to be given that 
evening by the Faculty and the old girls in 
the gymnasium, from half past seven until 
nine o'clock, and in order to get acquainted 
more easily, she proposed that every girl 
should wear a card with her name and ad- 
dress upon it. The Misses Barber Howes, 
E. Harris and Lum received. After an 
hour of pleasant chatting, refreshments were 
served, Miss Kendrick presiding over the 
coffee table, Miss Nutt serving the chocolate, 
and Miss Ransom, the lemonade. Then 
some one played for such as wished to dance, 
and the rest continued the pleasant pastime 
of getting acquainted, until it was time to 
disperse. 

September 16. — Instead of the regular 
Christian Endeavor meeting on Sunday 
evening, Dr. F. E. Clark, who has so re- 
cently returned from his trip around the 
world, talked upon "The Broad Way, and 
the Narrow Way," commenting on the 
appropriateness of such a subject for us, 
who were just starting out upon a new sea- 



son of work, expressing a hope that we 
would all choose "that better part." 

September 17. — Soon after lunch Mr. 
Bragdon, with all those who had expressed 
a desire to see Boston sights under his guid- 
ance, left the Seminary for a trip to Bunker 
Hill and the Navy Yard. The former place 
of interest was first visited, most of the party 
climbing the 294 steps to the top of the fam- 
ous monument on Breed's Hill. From this 
height an excellent view was obtained of the 
city and vicinity. Next the party hastened 
to the Navy Yard, first visiting the rope 
factory, and after this the foundries, where 
iron is beaten into all sorts of shapes for use 
upon the ships, proved interesting, as did 
also the old ship sheds. Moored near by 
was Dewey's flagship, the Olympia, and 
very fitting it seemed that "Old Ironsides" 
lay anchored not far off. Although en- 
trance to the former was denied, all went on 
board the latter. The training ship Wa- 
bash was next visited, after which a few of 
the party entered the Navy Yard Museum, 
while the more musically inclined stayed 
outside to listen to a marine band. It was 
now time to hasten homeward, and all left 
Boston feeling well satisfied with their "little 
journey in the world." 

September 23. — The Monthly Missionary 
meeting took the place of the Christian En- 
deavor, as Mrs. Waterbury, a former mis- 
sionary to India, who was to speak to the 
girls, could not conveniently come at any 
other time. She took for her text, "Lift 
up your eyes, and look on the fields," and 
then gave a most interesting talk upon the 
mission work done in the principal Eastern 
countries. In closing she mentioned three 
things that eacji one of us could do now to 
help on missions: 1, Learn about the work; 
2, Give to the work; 3, Pray for the work. 
Every one was much interested in what she 
said, and felt a greater desire to help than in 
past days. 



LASELL LEAVES 



17 



September 24. — A party of fourteen, with 
Mr. Bragdon as conductor, took a delightful 
trip to Nantasket. The ride by rail, through 
South Boston, Weymouth and other places, 
was very picturesque, and gave a clear idea 
of the surrounding country. Nantasket, 
although quiet, seemed no less delightful to 
many who had never before been to the 
coast. After a hearty dinner the party 
climbed over the rocks, saw many interest- 
ing points along the coast, and walked on 
the sand. The ride back on the boat was 
very enjoyable, and especially interesting 
because of the numerous noted points to be 
seen en route. 

September 25. — Rev. Charles M. Sheldon, 
the author of "In His Steps," was a guest of 
the Newton Christian Endeavor Union, at 
the Eliot Church, Newton, and all those who 
cared to hear him went over with Mr. Brag- 
don. Taking for his subject "The Open 
Door," Mr. Sheldon went on to speak of the 
many opportunities to be faced today. 
"This," he said, "is the greatest age the 
world has ever seen, not because of its mon- 
ey making power, not because of its inven- 
tions, not because of the knowledge of nat- 
ural sciences, but because there never before 
was an age that provided such great oppor- 
tunity for us to serve God and man." 

October 1. — The annual trip to Lexing- 
ton and Concord, taken on this day, was, if 
such a thing were possible, more enjoyable 
than last year's excursion. Four barges of 
enthusiastic sight-seers left the Seminary at 
a little after nine. It was about an hour's 
ride to Lexington, the first stopping place. 
Here was seen the famous Buckran Tavern. 
On the common is the site of the three meet- 
ing houses behind which the British formed, 
and a granite slab near by marks the line of 
the Minute Men. The Hancock House was 
especially interesting with its relics of 1775. 
The patriotism of the girls was aroused as 



they gazed at the home of Jonathan Har- 
rington and heard again the story of how he 
died on the doorstep, faithful to his coun- 
try's cause. On the road to Concord is the 
well at which James Hayward was killed, 
and the bluff used as a rallying place by the 
British was pointed out. There were other 
objects of interest also, not of an historical 
nature at all, one being a box of apples which 
Mr. Bragdon unexpectedly produced, and 
which were much appreciated by all. Con- 
cord is very interesting, both in an historic 
and in a literary way. "The Wayside," the 
home of Hawthorne, and, for a time, also 
that of Louisa May Alcott, was the first 
stopping place of the party. Here is the 
magnificent grove of pines in which Haw- 
thorne took his daily walks. Emerson's 
home came next, then the Alcott residence; 
the party did not stop here, however, but go- 
ing farther, saw in Sleepy Hollow cemetery 
the graves of all these famous people. The 
lunches were eaten near the old North 
Bridge, on the other side of which is 
French's famous statue of the Minute Man, 
a remarkable work of art on account of the 
character expressed in the face. On the 
way home all stopped at the Hill burying 
grounds, visited the place where Thoreau's 
hut formerly stood, and took a look at Mai- 
den Pond. The party arrived home at 
about a quarter of six, well satisfied with 
their day's outing. 

The fine excursion waggons were fur- 
nished by Mr. G. E. Keyes, who has for 
many years managed the excursions of this 
sort for Lasell. 

October 8. — At 12.30 on Monday, two 
barges left the Seminary on an excursion to 
Cambridge. The first object of interest 
shown us was Paul Revere's house, where he 
printed a paper and some Continental 
money. Near by, in a corner of an old 
graveyard, was a slab which marked the site 



i8 LASELL LEAVES 

of the meeting house in which was held the Too Late. 
first provincial congress. At Mount Au- Some painful things have happened this 
burn we visited the graves of Philipps Brooks, year in the necessary turning away of the 
the great preacher; Fanny Fern, the noted overflow. Four of last year's girls, for 
writer for children; Rufus Choate, the great good reason, doubtless, on their part, re- 
Boston lawyer, and the business partner of tained their applications until too late. This 
Mr. Durant, the founder to Wellesley; Ed- we felt very sorry about, for it seems a pity 
win Booth, the actor; Jean Louis Agassiz, to interrupt. Several new ones, thinking 
the Gernman scientist; Oliver Wendell there was no hurry, came to the door with 
Holmes, and James Russell Lowell. We friends and trunks. But hardest of all was 
also went to see the crematory of Mount to turn from our door, our own Bettie Mor- 
Auburn Cemetery, formerly the old chapel, ris, now Mrs. John Shearn, who came with 
and visited also Outlook Tower. Not far four children and nurse, all the way from 
from the chapel, we read the inscription on Houston, Texas, to leave the oldest, Cora, a 
the large stone sphinx erected in 1872 in charming girl, in the old school where the 
commemoration of the emancipation of the mother spent five years. This did moisten 
slaves. It reads thus : "American Union our eyes. We hope for earlier application 
preserved, African slavery destroyed by the next year. Mrs. Shearn looks almost our 
uprising of a great people, by the blood of own Bettie, who made us all love her in the 
fallen heroes." Soon after we had left the earlier days. If I were a girl, I'd say she 
cemetery we came in sight of "Elmwood," hadn't changed a bit in looks. We have 
Lowell's birthplace, and a little farther on since heard, through Bettie's mother, that 
saw the home of Longfellow. We stopped Cora was placed in Mr. Williard's school, at 
at the Washington Elm, marked by this in- Wollaston, before the family returned to 

scription: "Under this tree, July 3, 1775, Texas. 

Washington first took command of the PASSED AWAY. 
American Army." Next came Memorial —Always side by side with the joy of re- 
Hall, and from there we went to the Agassiz union of fiends in the fall, when schools re- 
Museum of Harvard. We spent much time open and business is resumed, comes news 
admiring the glass flowers. A placard says from one an( j anot her of our dear friends or 
of them, "These glass models illustrate vege- va i ue d acquaintances, that grief has invaded 
table structures, and are part of a collection their homes, and that precious faces are 
as yet unarranged, presented to Harvard missing- from the family circle. To the 
University by Miss Elizabeth C. Ware and Leaves comes tidings of the death of Mrs. 
Mary S. Ware in memory of the late Dr. Emma A. Goll, mother of Emma and 
Charles E. Ware, class of 1834." The Blanche; of Mr. George R. Davis, father of 
models are the work of Leopold and Ru- our Nellie Davis; of Mrs. Willard Case, 
dolph Blaschka of Germany. We reached mother of Mabel Case Viot; of Mrs. Eliza- 
the Seminary again at about 5.30, well beth Tiffany Symns, mother of Effie Symns, 
pleased with our journey. Tiffany Symns, mother of Effie Symns, 
— The Lasell students recently sent $40.00 who many of us remember; and Mr. Delos 
to the Galveston Fund. There are five pu- E. Goldsmith, husband of Sara Bond Gold- 
pils from Texas at Lasell this year. smith. 



LASELL LEAVES 



19 



— Just as we go to press, word comes of 
the death of a beloved cousin of Sadie Hol- 
lingsworth Thompson, Miss Leila Hollings- 
worth, of Evansville, Ind., corresponding 
secretary of the Woman's Board of Mis- 
sions, and a woman of fine abilities and note- 
worthy graces of character. 

— To all those whom the departure of 
these has left desolate and sorrow-stricken, 
we wish to express sincerest sympathy and 
deep regret. 

You Will Never Be Sorry. 

For using gentle words. 

For doing your best. 

For being kind to the poor. 

For looking before leaping. 

For hearing before judging. 

For thinking before speaking. 

For harboring clean thoughts. 

For standing by your principles. 

For asking pardon when in error. 

For being generous to an enemy. 

For showing courtesy to your seniors. 

For making others happy. 

For being kind to animals. 



Foot Anatomy. 

Is a branch of science that the skilled shoe 
maker has to thoroughly master. The 
makers of 




have, after years of experience, acquired a 
knowledge enabling them to produce shoes 
that have a snug, glove-like fit at the heel, 
ankle and instep, seldom found even in the 
finest custom-made shoes, and they reveal a 
style and individuality of their own which all 
good dressers appreciate. 

(Forty styles in all Leathers.) 



Always 



S3.50 



Pair. 




Business Established 1817. 



JOHN H. PRAY & SONS CO. 



Wholesale and retail dealers in 



CARPETS -A-isro ZR,TTC3-S 



of both Foreign and Domestic Manufacture; also 



Curtains, Draperies, Portieres 



and all 

descriptions 

of choice 



Upholstery Fabrics, 



(^-PRICES ALWAYS MODERATE.^ 



vTOHITsr IK. PRAY & SOILTS CO., 

Oldest and liarg'est Carpet House In Wew Xng-laud. 

PRAY BUILDING, Opposite Boylston St. 

6 5 8 WASHINGTON STREET, BOSTGN. 6 5 8 



20 



LASELL LEAVES 



FREEMAN & FLETCHER, 

THE FLORISTS. 

12 CHARLES STREET, AUBURNDALE. 

Nearest Greenhouses to Lasell. 
Long Distance Telephone. 

Mrs. C. H. HALL, 

DRESSMAKER. 

Work d*ne at reasonable prices. 

Special rates to students. 

490 AUBURN STREET, AUBURNDALE. 



SHOES FOR 
YOUNG LADIES. 

Newest Shapes. Newest Styles for Gym- 
nasium, Tennis, Walking and Dress. 

WE GIVE TEN PER CENT. DISCOUNT 
TO AEJj JjA.SE1.Ij STUDENTS. 

THE HENRY H. 
TUTTLE CO., 

Cor. WASHINGTON and WINTER STS., 
BOSTON. 




SPWGE^ B^OS. CO. 
CLiORK, SUIT and pU$ HOUSE 

155 TREMONT STREET, NEAR WEST STREET. 

Ladies' Coats, Capes, Suits, Furs, Golf Capes, Golf Skirts, Walking 

Skirts, Waists, Traveling Rugs, etc. 

Superior Grade Furs a Specialty. Discount to Students. 

NEW CUSTOM DEPARTMENT. FINEST IN THE CITY. SKILLED MANAGEMENT. 
COURTEOUS ATTENTION. PROMPT EXECUTION OP ORDERS. 



.A^daios &c Cn-ilt>ert, 

OPXICIAJNTS. 

MANUFACTURERS of Spectacles and Eye Glasses, and Im- 
porters of Opera, Field and Marine Glasses and Optical 
Goods of every description. Oculists' prescription work a 
specialty. 

165 Tremont Street, Boston. 

FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

OF WEST NEWTON, MASS. 

James H. Nickerson, Pres. A. R. Mitchell, Vice-Pres. 

Edward P. Hatch, Cashier. 

General Banking, Collection and Exchange. 
Capital, $100,000. 

Business hours dally, 8.30 to 12 a. m. and 1 to 3 p. m. 
Saturdays, 8.30 a. m. to 12 m. Safe deposit boxes to rent in 
new fire and burglar proof vault. 

ELLIOT W. KEYES 



TAYLOR BLOCK, 



AUBURNDALE 



Apothecary. 



Drugs, Medicines and Toilet Articles. 
California Perfumes. Confections. 



Rockwell and Churchill. 



PRINTER8 

THIRTY-NINE ARCH 8TREET, 
BOSTON, MASS. 



SCHOOL ANNUALS, 
ANNOUNCEMENTS, 
CATALOGUES. 



PRINTERS OF LASELL CATALOGUE. 



C. RAYMOND di LUC CI, 

CHOICE FRUITS, CANDY, NUTS, ETC. 

C GARS AND .TOBACCO. 

365 AUBURN STREET, corner ASS STREE1 

AUBURNDALE, MASS. 

IB. S. OOJL.E 



MUTTON, LAMB, VEAL, 

POULTRY and GAME 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL. 



Stalls 13 and 15, Faneuil Hall Market, Boston. 

Telephone connection. 

George W. Kimball & Co., 

Wholesale and retail dealers in 

Poultry, Game, Beef, Mutton, Lamb and Yeal. 

Basement, No. 32a North Street, opposite Merchants' 
Row, Boston. 

Telephone 927 Haymarket. 



Howard M. Smith. 



Albert P. Smith. 



SMITH BROTHERS. 

(Successors to Geo. H. Phil brook & Co.) 

Butter, Cheese, Egg's 

Stalls No. 2 aud 4, 
Faneuil Hall Market, Boston, Mass. 

Telephone, Haymarket 884. 



LASELL LEAVES 



21 




Ladies' Shirt and Golf Waists, 
$5.00 to $20.00. 

From Madras, Oxfords, Cheviot, French 
Percales, English and French Flannels, 
Silk and Moire Poplin. 



Blanket Wraps 

For the Nursery. 
For the Sick Room. 
For the Bath. 

For Steamer Traveling. 
For the Railway Carriage. 
For Yachting. 
For Men, Women, Children and the 
Baby, $2.75 to $35, with Hood and 
Girdle complete. 



A Special Department for 

Ladies' Golf Waists, 
Bicycle and Golf Skirts, 
Entire Golfing Suits. 

GOLF CLUBS, 
GOLF BALLS and 
CADDY BAGS. 




NOYES BROS. 

Washington and Summer Streets, 

BOSTON, Mass., U. S. A. 



FURS. 



FURS. 



COLLARETTES, 
STORM COLLARS, 
SCARFS and MUFFS. 



SPECIAL DISCOUNT TO LASELL 
STUDENTS. 



DAVIS, CHAPIN CO. 

J. A. BARKER, President. 

Commission Merchants and Wholesale 
Dealers in Foreign and Domestic 

Fruits and Produce. 

83 and 85 Faneuil Hall Market, 

Cellar 15 South Side, 

Boston, Mass. 

Telephone Hay market 777. 



Edw. Kakas & Sons 

162 Tremont St. 



MILLS & DEERING, 

Receivers and Healers in Fine Grades of 

BUTTER 

AND STRICTLY FMJESS EGGS. 

CHAS. W. HICCINS, 

Choice Family Groceries. 

Teas, Coffees, Bpices, Canned Goods, Fancy 
Crackers, Fruit, Nuts and Confections. 

Davis Block, 417 Auburn St., Auburn dale. 



22 



LASELL LEAVES 



JOSHUA THORNDIKE. 



CHAS. W. SPEAR 



JOSHUA THORNDIKE & CO. 



DEALERS IN 



MUTTON, LAMB and VEAL 

Stalls 3 and 5 New Faneuil Hall Market, 
BOSTON, MASS. 

Edward E. Babb & Co. 

25 Arch St., Boston, Mass. 

Dealers in 

SCHOOL BOOKS and SCHOOL SOPPLIES 

D. A. HOWE 

273 MAIN STREET, WORCESTER, MASS. 

WHOLESALE GROCER. 

Gallons Canned Goods of all kinds and of the best 
quality a specialty. Teas and Coffees. 



Dr. GEORGE A. BATES, 

TAYLOR BLOCK, AUBURNDALE. 

DENTIST. 

Office hours. — Mondays, Wednesdays, Thursdays 
and Saturdays, 8 a. m. to 4 p. m. 



If You Wish to Buy Send t0 us for prices or 

other information. We 
carry the largest stock of 
any store in New England, 
and can furnish any l)ooks 
in print at the shortest 
notice. We can save you 

money. Catalogue of special bargains mailed free. 



De Wolfe, Fiske & Co. 

361 and 365 Washington St., Boston, Mass. 

^ytwhoj™^ FARMi'fteB. 




iwet h»«« . 



FINEST ROAD-BED ON THE CONTINENT. 



Boston and Albany Railroad. 



THROUGH CAR SERVICE IN EFFECT SEPTEMBER 20, 1900. 



No. 7 — Leaves Boston at 8.30 a. m. except Sunday. Wagner buffet drawing-room car, Boston to Albany. 
No. 15 — Leaves Boston at 10.45 a. m. daily. Wagner vestibuled buffet library-smoking car and vestibuled 

sleeping cars. Boston to Chicago, via L. S. & M. S. R. R. to St. Louis via Big Four 

Route. Dining car service. 
No. 19 — Leaves Boston at 2.00 p. m. daily. The North Shore Special Wagner buffet vestibuled sleeping 

cars, Boston to Cleveland and Chicago. i 

No. 23 — Leaves Boston at 3.30 p. m. except Sunday. Wagner buffet vestibuled 'sleeping cars, Boston to 

Niagara Falls. Tourist sleeping car Boston to Chicago. 
No. 37 — Leaves Boston at 6.00 p. >m. daily. Wagner vestibuled sleeping car, Boston to Cleveland and 

Cincinnati via L. S. & M. S. R. R. ; also Wagner vestibuled sleeping car, Boston to Detroit 

and Chicago via M. C. R. R. 
No. 63 — Leaves Boston at 11.00 p. m., except Saturday. Wagner sleeping car, Boston to Albany, arriv- 
ing at 7.57 a. m. 
For information, maps, time-tables, tickets and accommodations in drawing-room and sleeping cars, 
apply to agents of Boston & Albany Railroad at its several stations. 

J. L. WHITE, City Pass, and Ticket Agent, or to A. S. HANSON, Gen. Pass. Agent. 

The only first-class through line from New England to the West. 



City Ticket Office, 366 Washington St., Boston 



LASELL LEAVES 



23 




COTRELL I LEONARD, 

ALBANY, N. Y. 

MAKEKS OF 

CAPS, GOWNS and HOODS 

to the American Universities and to 
Lasell Seminary. Illustrated Man- 
ual, Samples, etc., upon application. 



PLEASE FORWARD GOODS BY 

JOHNSON & KEYES EXPRESS CO. 

AUBURNDALE AND BOSTON EXPRESS. 

Offices: 34 Court Sq., 77 Kingston, 105 Arch Streets 

BOSTON. 

WAUWINET FARM. 

COMMONWEALTH AVE. AND VALENTINE ST., 

WEST NEWTON, MASS 
All interested in a modern Dairy are invited to visit the Farm. 



DEALER IN 



Corner Auburn and Lexington Streets, 

.Anburndale, Mass. 



Established 1830 

Alfed Mudge & Son 
PRINTERS 

24 Franklin Street, Boston 

CLASS PE1NTING 
A SPECIALTY 



-A^ndrew J. Lloyd & Co. 
OPTICIANS 

DOWN-TOWN-323 Washington St., opp. Old South Church. 

BACK BAY-310 Boylston St., opp. Arlington St. 

Bring your prescriptions for Eyeglasses and Spectacles to us. 
A complete line of Photographic Goods always in stock. The 
best place in Boston to nave your developing and printing 
done. Send for our price list, 



Francis Baohelder. 



F. 9. Snyder 



Francis Bachelder 
& Co. 

Beef, Pork, Mutton, "Veal, Poultry, 

Game, Hams, Bacon, Lard, Butter, 

Cheese, Eggs, Cream, etc. 

Wholesale 

Provisions and Produce 



Proprietors of CAPITOL CREAMERIES, 

Central Station, Montpelfer, Vt. 



Poultry and Egg House, 

Fenton, Michigan, 



Smoke Houses, Sausage Factory, Ham Cooking Fac- 
tory, Cold Storage, etc., 55, 57, 59, 61 and 63 
Blackstone Street, 

Boston, Mass. 



G. L. Lawrence. F. B. Eastman. 

J. P. LAWRENCE & CO., 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

Poultry, TVild. Game. 

Goods for Shipping a Specialty. 

30 FANEUIL HALL MARKET, BOSTON. 

Telephone, Haymarket 919. 

WM. O-^PSTIOK, 

ASPEN AVENUE, AUBURNDALE, MASS. 

FLORIST. 

Bedding Plants, Cut Roses and Carnations a specialty. 



24 



LASELL LEAVES 



WOODLAND PARK HOTEL 

AUBURNDALE, MASS. 

Five minutes' walk from Lnsell. Open all the year. 
CHAS C. BUTLER. 



HENRY W. GOODWIN, 

7S-80 Broad Street, Mason Building, Boston. 

BRYANT & MAY'S 
LONDON PARLOUR MATCHES 



Preferred Stoek 

MOCHA AND JAVA 

COFFEE. 

THE HIGHEST GRADE OF BLKNDED COFFEE. 
ROASTED AND PACKED BY 

Martin L. Hall & Co., 

Boston, Mass. 



J, WOODWARD 

FISH, OYSTERS, EGGS, CANNED GOODS, 
VEGETABLES, ETC. 

Co?. Auburn and Ash Sts., Auburndale, Mass. 

BARLOW'S ICE CREAM. 

J. B. SANDERSON, Proprietor. 

Telephone 261-3. WEST NEWTON, MASS. 

Catering in all its branches at reasonable prices. 



BEEF, FORK, LARD, HAMS, BACON, 
PIGS' FEET and TRIPE. 



STURTEVANT & HALEY 
BEEF and SUPPLY CO. 

38 and 40 Faneuil Hall Market, 

BOSTON, MASS. 

TALLOW, STEARINE, 
FINE OLEO, OIL, SCRAP, Etc. 



CHARLES F. HATHAWAY, 

MANUFACTURING BAKER. 



Crackers, Biscuit, Bread, Cake and Pastry. Wholesale 
jobber of Kennedy's Celebrated Crackers. Hathaway's 
original Home-made Cream Bread, best in the world, 
kept by all leading grocers. 

Factories: 1906 Mass. Ave., Cambridge. 
769 Main Street, Waltham. 



THIS SPACE IS PAID FOR 



BY A FRIEND. 



W. H. PRIOR. 



C. A. PRIOR 



JPBIOM BROS. 

Successors to Wm. Prior, Jr., & Co. 
Wholesale and retail dealers in all kinds of 

Ocean, Lake and River Fisb, Oysters and Clams 

127 and 129 Faneuil Ball Market, Soston, Mass. 

Telephone, 673 Haymarket. 



ICE 



sold by ns is cut from Longfellow's Pond, Wellesley 
Hills. Water from pond is used in Wellesley public 
service. The Newton Ice Co. is prepared to furnish a first 
class quality of POND ICE in West Newton, Newtou- 
ville, Auburndale, Newton Lower Falls and Wellesley Hills. 



MILLER & HATCH, Props. 



P. O. Address, Newton Lower Falls. 



A Hardware Store for a hundred years. 

Burditt & Williams 

Dealers in 

Builders' and General Hardware 
Supplies, Tools and Cutlery. 

20 DOCK SQ. 5 BOSTON. 



LA SELL LEAVES 



25 



THE 



COLLEGE 
GIRL 



Will always find at our store the LATEST 

CONCEITS IN STATIONERY as well as the other 

necessaries for her college work. 

Economical prices prevail. 



THORP & MARTIN CO. 

FINE STATIONERY SHOP. 

12 MILK STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 

Shrove, Crump & Low Co. 

147 Tremont St., Boston. 

JEWELERS and SILVERSMITHS. 



STATIONERY, CLASS and SOCIETY PINS. 

Designs submitted and estimates furnished. 



The KNICKERBOCKER SHOE 

FOR COLLEGE GIRLS. 

e. W. BURT St CO. 

Manufacturers. 



Automobile Eed. 

Enamel. 

Box Calf. 



$3.50 



French Pat. Calf. 
Wax Calf. 
Russet Calf. 



Wide Extension Edges. Heavy or Light Soles. 

Fancy Wing Tips 50c. extra. 
Extension Heels for Golf. All the latest N. Y. Styles 

BOSTON STORE, 40 WEST STREET. 



SEND 



SCHIRM 



MUSIC STORE, 



(The Boston Music Company.) 



26 WEST ST., 



FOE 



BOSTON, MASS. 



Sheet Music, Music Books, Strings, etc. 

Prompt and efficient service as well as advantageous 
price guaranteed. The singer's Guide, the Piano 
Teachers' Guide, and Choir Master's Guide sent gratis 
to any address. 



Cobb, Aldrich & Co. 



Corner of Washington and Kneeland Streets, Boston* 



ALWAYS have in stock 

THE NICEST assortment of 



CRYSTALLIZED VIOLETS. 
All kinds of French Fruits, Glacbs, 
Stuffed Prunes, Salted Almonds, 
Pecans and Peanuts, Violet Sachet, 
Bonbonnierres, French Bonbons, Fancy 
Chocolates, Nougatines, Marshmallow, 
Opera Caramels, etc. 



CONFECTIONS 

OF THEIR OWN MANUFACTURE 

TO BE FOUND ANYWHERE 



FANCY CRACKERS 

OF EVERY 
DESCRIPTION. 



Also a full line of Stuffed Olives, Pim-Olas, Fancy Pickles, 
Preserves and Condiments especially adapted to Dinner and Evening Parties 



CATALOGUE FORWARDED UPON APPLICATION. 



26 



LASELL LEAVES 



THE DAY 




STORE 



provides every convenience for satis- 
factory shopping — parlor for reading, 
writing and resting — postofflce — tele- 
graph office — safety elevators running 
to basement and upper floors— every corner thoroughly lighted and ventilated. While our effort is to bring 
an increasing number of customers each day to the various departments, yet our desire is to have EVERY 
purchase and the detail op every transaction so conducted by our employees that a peeling op 
entire SATISFACTION WILL ACCOMPANY EACH sale. Ladies' Outer Garments, Corsets, Underwear and 
Shoes are prominent everyday features of our store. 



GILCHRIST & CO. 

WINTER and WASHINGTON STREETS. 



THE NEW SCALE 

HALLETT & DAVIS 
PIANOS. 

The recognized standard of the musical world. We 
have no hesitancy in saying that our Piano as made 
today is as near a perfect instrument as is possible to 
manufacture. You should try and hear the New Scale 
Hallett & Davis if you are interested in a beautiful 
toned piano. We can surprise you in price, quality 
and tone. 

Established 60 Years. 179 TREMONT STREET. 



C. W. Davidson, Pres. 
Newtonville. 



F. F. Davidson, Treas. 
Auburndale. 



THOMAS LONG COMPANY, 

77 Summer St., Boston. 

GOLDSMITHS AND SILVERSMITHS. 

3pecial designs always in stock. 

Newest ideas in Jewelry, Sterling Silver, Cut Glass, 
Umbrellas and Pocket-books. 
Repairing a specialty. 
Makers of Class and Society Pins and Golf Prizes. 

Dr. W. F. HALL, 
Dentist. 



211 Central Street, Near Station, 



Auburndale. 



HOURS FROM 8 a. m. till 5 p. m. 

Refers by permission to many patients in this city. 

All Fillings warranted. Only the best of materials used. 

Special attention given to Crown and Bridge Work. 

H. B. Thayer 

NEWEST FASHIONS IN SHOES. 

Special discount to students. 
144 TREMONT STREET, BOSTON. 







¥ 



DD THINGS. 



Brooches, 
Hat Pins, 
Buckles, 
Posters, 
Steins, 
Flags. 

387 Washington St., nTjTtTf o r>T TCU 
Boston, Mass. rSlUN 1 &, hJUbH. 



rail, 1900. 



"We take pleasure in announcing 



the completion by our "Jour" Tailors 



of the latest novelties in 



ladies' Suits and £adies' (Xoats 



which are now displayed in the beautiful 



£adies' Su.it I^oera 



adjoining our Ladies' Garment Annex. 



s*^. SKuman Sf So. 



Shuman Corner. Boston. 









PASELL FBAVE5 



it 



DUX FE/^mA FACTI." 



Vol. XXVI. Lasell Seminary, Auburndale, Mass., November, 1900. Number 2 

Published monthly during the School year by the Lasell Publishing Association. 



ANNA M. PINKHAM, '02. 

Local Editor. 
RUTH M. TALCOTT. 



Editor-in-chief. 
GEORGIE M. DUNCAN, '02. 

Associate Editors. 
BESSIE Y. FUIvIvER, '02. 

Subscription Agent. 
ETHEL M. GAt^AGHER, '01. 



IDA M. MALI.ORY, '03 



Exchange Editor. 
MABEL MARTIN, '01. 



Business Manager. 
ETHI.YN F. BARBER, '01. 



Asst. Business Manager. 
JOANNA F. DEERING, '02. 



TERMS, in Advance: One copy, one year (including Postage), $1.00. Single copies, 15 cents. 



ADVERTISING RATES. 



SPACE. 


3 months 


6 months 


9 months 


SPACE. 


3 months 


6 months 


9 months 


1-8 Column, .... 
1-6 " .... 
1-4 " .... 


$2.00 
3.00 
4.00 


$3.75 
5.00 
6.50 


$5.00 
6.50 
9.00 


1-2 Column 

3-4 " .... 
1 " .... 


$6.50 

9.00 

12.00 


$11.00 
15.00 
19.00 


$15.00 
20.00 
25.00 



The Editors will be glad to receive from the students and Alumna any communications and items of 
interest to the school. 



Editorials. 



WE were glad to see our girls show such 
great interest in politics in general, 
and especially in the presidential election of 
this year. During the last few days before 
the election they became very enthusiastic, 
and many tried to make themselves more 
familiar with the main points of the different 
political platforms, that they might better 
judge their respective merits. The princi- 
pal topic of conversation at the table, at the 
walking time, on the golf links, in fact every- 
where the girls were, was the coming elec- 
tion. We were all delighted to be allowed 
to cast our votes in the gymnasium on Tues- 
day afternoon, and waited somewhat im- 



patiently for our own returns, which were 
very satisfactory, of course, to the majority. 
The votes cast were as follows : For 
Woolley, 6; for Bryan 12; for McKinley, 
130. From this it may be inferred that we 
have practically a Republican school this 
year. 

It has been known for some time that the 
election would be close this year, and every- 
one has watched the indications anxiously, 
and when election day at last arrived the 
country was at the highest pitch of excite- 
ment. It is the more surprising, then, and 
the more gratifying that our people, so great 
in numbers and so diverse in sentiments and 



28 



LASELL LEAVES 



interests, should so quietly accept the de- 
cision made at the polls, and show so little 
desire to indulge in any violent expression 
of dissatisfaction. This shows that the law- 
abiding spirit is more general and more 
deeply-rooted than many would have us be- 
lieve. 

Now that the welfare of our country is 
once more assured, our interest centres upon 
the state elections for governors and sena- 
tors, for a time eclipsed by the more im- 
portant election of the president. Of course 
each girl is especially interested in the wel- 
fare of her own state. We sincerely hope 
that the young men are as earnest and en- 
thusiastic in politics, as the girls seem to be; 
they could hardly be more so than some of 

us. 

* » 

GYMNASIUM and drill have begun 
earlier, it seems to us, than last year, 
owing probably to the chilly weather we have 
had. We are glad to see Miss Adams once 
more in the gymnasium, and on the whole 
are not sorry to resume our vigorous exer- 
cise there, though we were a little dissatis- 
fied at first, perhaps, that it began so early. 
We hope that the zeal of the new girls in 
this work will not slacken as the year ad- 
vances, for it is one of the best and most 
beneficial of the school, if we take it in the 
right way. Another very helpful exercise 
is our military drill. It seems to us that the 
new girls are not so enthusiastic over it as 
they would be, if they were fully awake to its 
value. The work of the junior companies 
is the same as in former years, but the senior 
company has in place of bayonet drill, the 
Butt's Rifle Calisthenics, which we think is 
going to prove more graceful and interesting 
than the bayonet drill. This we shall have 

later in the year. 

m » 

Happiness is not perfected until it is 

shared. 



Address of Welcome. 



By mistake in calculating space, the welcome of 
Mrs. Martin to the students was omitted in our last 
issue. So great was the disappointment of our read- 
ers that we are glad to publish it even at this late 
day. 

Notes from Mrs. Blanche C. Martin's ad- 
dress to the pupils of Lasell Seminary. 

Once again it is my happy privilege to 
extend, for the Faculty, a cordial welcome 
to the pupils of Lasell Seminary, — a name 
awakening pleasurable emotions in every 
state in the Union, and one that has become 
known as the synonym for high ideals, hon- 
est endeavor, and impregnable courage — 
ideals,, which keep one alert with noble dis- 
content, and provide a motive for noble 
life, — honesty of purpose, which, having 
raised its ideals and progressive standards, 
strives up to them, — courage, which stamps 
its armor with Lowell's behest : 

"Greatly begin, though thou have time, 
But for a line, be that sublime. 
Not failure, but low aim, is crime." 

With heart, as with voice, we welcome 
those dear familiar ones, who have returned 
to help us with the light of their presence, 
and their confidence; and we recall with 
tenderness those who have left us to enter 
the larger realm of study. With no less 
sincerity and love, we welcome to our halls 
and hearts those strange young faces, where 
curiosity and inquiry reveal the corner-stone 
of a mutual interest. 

We meet here as pupils and teachers, but 
throughout that intercourse must be the in- 
fluence which binds those positions into a 
unity of purpose and action — the bond of 
friendship — a friendship that means more 
than that social friendliness and pleasurable 
attraction, which make people seek each 
other for the pleasure it gives. Right friend- 
ship is that heart-touch of sympathy and un- 
derstanding which makes it possible for one 



LASELL LEAVES 



29 



person to seek another in trouble or difficulty 
in any of the deeper experiences of life. The 
heart-touch of compassion lasts always, and 
is far beyond the common friendship, which 
is based upon approval or admiration. 

We do not seek to educate you in what 
you are sometime to be. Life and its mean- 
ing is already here. Eternity is now. Our 
requirement is not merely the compression 
of many facts in the gray matter of your 
brain, but the complete expansion of your- 
self. Here in this school, all we ask is the 
obvious effort of each pupil to do her best. 
Nature has fixed no boundaries to human 
endeavor. The courage and the will of the 
individual alone are responsible for limited 
results. 

As you will learn later on, education does 
not mean the mere attainment of certain 
facts, but the broadening of the individual 
to increase the power of life and elevate the 
quality of character, and make the intellect 
a power for good, and the will capable of 
enforcing it. 

Lasell means more than text-book knowl- 
edge. It means a thorough appreciation of 
things, books and people. It means a sym- 
pathetic and noble recognition of the excel- 
lence of beauty, truth and good. It means 
susceptibility and adaptability, those quali- 
ties which enable one to live in harmony with 
environment, and draw from the treasures 
of life, as well as contribute to them. 

Adaptability is the spirit of the age in 
education. Adaptability is the result of an 
all round development of power. An all 
round development of power means a well 
balanced intellect, — an intellect that can 
swing on its swivel without tipping, and ad- 
just each particle of knowledge to the de- 
mands life may make upon it. Adaptability 
means the recognition of every opportunity 
and the courage to attack it. 

Opportunity exists everywhere; in the 



home, in the school, and in the world; and 
its greatness is only measured by the power 
of the individual to meet it. The individual 
who is awake to the virtue of the immediate 
present compels opportunity, because he is 
able to "recognize the hint of every inci- 
dent." 

Ralph Waldo Emerson says : "Man goes 
along with his head over his shoulder, la- 
menting the past, or, stands on tiptoe to fore- 
see the future, unheeding the riches that sur- 
round him, and shall never find peace until 
he, too, learns to live with Nature in the 
present, above time." Comparatively few 
truly live. The majority mope through a 
kind of existence without ever realizing 
their own greatness and power to overcome 
all undesirable conditions. We should 
learn early in life that the secret of success 
and the mastery of situations lie in alertness 
and self-confidence. Edward Rowland Sill 
gives a most convincing illustration of this 
truth in a poem he has well named 

"OPPORTUNITY." 

This I beheld, or dreamed it in a dream : — 
There spread a cloud of dust along a plain ; 
And underneath the cloud, or in it, raged 
A furious battle, and men yelled, and swords 
Shocked upon swords and shields. A Prince's ban- 
ner 
Wavered, then, staggered backward, hemmed by 
foes. 

A craven hung along the battle's edge, 
And thought, "Had I a sword of keener steel, — 
That blue blade that the King's son bears, — but this 
Blunt thing — !" he snapped and flung it from his 

hand, 
And lowering crept away and left the field. 

Then came the King's son, wounded, sore bestead 
And weaponless, and saw the broken sword 
Hilt buried in the dry and trodden sand, 
And ran and snatched it, and with battle shout 
Lifted afresh he hewed his enemy down, 
And saved a great cause that heroic day." 

To my mind, this poem contains one of 
the greatest of life's lessons — the immediate 
recognition of opportunity, and the courage 



3o 



LASELL LEAVES 



to attack it. Rarely, indeed, are we per- 
mitted to hold the blue blade of opportunity, 
but it makes little difference whether the 
blade be blue and keen, or blunted and brok- 
en, if it is firmly grasped in the strong right 
hand of courage. Whatever our life work, 
it is always more or less a struggle, where 
we meet and conquer circumstance, in pro- 
portion to our courage and desire. This 
you will find capable of constant demon- 
stration in your Seminary career, and these 
demonstrations are born of the virtues of 
cheerfulness, helpfulness, faithfulness and 
responsibility. Character grows from the 
cheerful acceptance of responsibility. 

Lasell is a school of varied opportunities, 
with teachers of specific personalities. Pro- 
fessor Bragdon, awake to the necessities of 
each generation, has selected his educational 
staff with a view to present each branch in 
the school curriculum in its most forceful 
and convincing manner. His desire, re- 
cognized by his co-laborers, stimulates each, 
not from a spirit of rivalry, but from true 

emulation to create a perfect whole; yet in 
every branch the attitude of your minds de- 
termines the result. It is for you to realize 
that in order to receive the greatest benefit 
from the school, every lesson must mean to 
you life and personal development. You 
must have faith not only in yourself, but in 
others. You must have courage which is 
born of high purpose, you must carry with 
you an atmosphere of hope and good cheer, 
and make an effort each day to live that 
which you are ambitious to become. 

Set your ideals high, for "the height of 
the ideal which you follow is the measure of 
your character and the index of your 
achievements." Try each day to idealize 
the commonplace by looking for the best. 
"Seek and ye shall find." Seek for the 
ideal in your school, in your teachers, and in 
your companions, and, finding, let nothing 



separate you. Do not let disenchantment 
appear to you as wisdom. Yourself may 
be responsible for your disappointment. 

However, it is not the discovery of ideals, 
but the search for them, that elevates. No 
honest endeavor was yet lost. Although a 
person may fail of the supposed object to- 
ward which he is striving, the greatness of 
soul which he realizes by the effort is, after 
all, the true reality. Greatness is not in 
what a man has, or attains, but what he be- 
comes, or is. The soul is bound on a mys- 
tic quest, which is so far beyond the judg- 
ment of the brain we use, that we must needs 
place before us temporary aims to lure us on 
to renewed endeavor. Attainment satisfies 
but for a moment. That moment is the 
one in which we look out from the high plat- 
form which we have attained, and perceive a 
greater. Then the divine discontent comes 
upon us, and we strive again. The lesson 
of it all is, that we must not gaze with long- 
ing eyes upon the past, but with its wealth 
of meaning well garnered in the soul, ad- 
vance with gladness in the conviction that 
the world is better and greater than we 
thought. Emerson says : "The voice of the 
Almighty saith, 'Up and onward forever 
more,' " and years of experience and wisdom 
gives the following tribute to such pursuit: 
IDEALS. 

My boyhood chased the butterfly, 
And when the shower was gone, 

Sought treasure at the rainbow's end, 
That lured me wond'ring on. 

I caught no bow or butterfly, 
Though eagerly I ran, 

But in the chase I found myself 
And grew to be a man. 

In later years I chased the good, 

The beautiful and true, 
Mirage-like forms that take no shape, 

They flit as I pursue. 

But while the endless chase I run, 

I grow in life divine. 
I miss the ideals that I seek, 

But God Himself is mine ! 



LASELL LEAVES 



3i 



This my friends is the message of Ideals, 
"As a man thinketh, so is he." Place your- 
self continually in the atmosphere of purest 
thought, and it will be rewarded in your 
completion of character. Tomorrow our 
duties begin; tonight we welcome you with 
loving tenderness, and desire to plant firmly 
in your hearts the thought that your growth, 
welfare and happiness, are our deepest con- 
sideration. 



CLASS OFFICERS. 

Senior. — President, Ethlyn Barber; vice- 
president, Edith Dustin; Secretary, Isabella 
Clemens; treasurer, Bessie Lum. 

Junior. — President, Ellen Chase; vice- 
president, Florence Hayden; secretary and 
treasurer, Edith Harris. 

Sophomore. — President, Frances Leavitt; 

vice-president, Joel Lapowski; secretary, 

Marie Biddle; treasurer, Isabel Blackstock. 
♦ ♦ 

The following have been favored with 
calls from members of their family : Misses 
Brewer, Dwinell, Walter, Tarbox, S. Law- 
rence, Mower, Bullock, Nelson, Tirrell, Whit- 
ney, Scoville, Goodwin, Talcott, J. Austin, 
Barker, Lockwood, Douglass, Upham, Day, 
Zeller, Bowers, Davis, Sisson, George E. 
and F. Toole, Hazelton, Pearson, A. Smith. 

Former Pupils. — Helen Abbott, La Verne 
Reynolds, Jessie Macmillan, Maud Conklin, 
Mabel Lutes, Grace and Ethel Loud, Bessie 
Roper, Marion Harrower, Helen Ramsdell, 
Ida Trowbridge, Laura Birdsey, Elizabeth 
Starks, Marietta Sisson, Emeroy Ginn, Elsie 
Reynolds, Mildred Faxon, Elise Scott, Mrs. 
Belle Jones Massey, Mrs. Alice Mayo Hicks, 
Helen and Ruth Rishell, Margie Schuberth, 
and Edith Atwood. 



Don't forget to be gentle and respectful 
to the aged, even when they are fussy and 
tiresome. 



A Tidy Bedroom. 

There is no place in which a girl's char- 
acter and individuality may be more clearly 
displayed than in her own room. If she is 
orderly and neat, careful of her belongings, 
or careless, destructive and extravagant in 
their use, her bedroom reflects traits and pe- 
culiarities. If she loves books and pictures, 
one will find them in her room ; if her tastes 
are trival and uncultivated, her surround- 
ings will show her need in culture. If she 
regards her room merely as a transient spot 
in which to sleep and dress, and not a place 
to read and think in, or where she may 
sometimes enjoy the companionship of her 
girl friends, she does not know the pleasure 
of having a room of her own. 

I know a girl who said : "I have tried to 
make my room a sort of cast to mold me in; 
to make it, in other words, represent the 
ideal girl I wish to make myself. In that 
way I have a room to grow up to, as well 
as to grow up in. I used to be very spas- 
modic about keeping my room in order, go- 
ing at the task with such energy at rare in- 
tervals that I quite exhausted my orderly 
powers. But in my experience of trying to 
improve myself I find that one is helped in- 
finitely by the simple habit of putting one's 
room in order, and by the harder task of 
keeping it so. I think one is sooner able to 
rule one's self, to sort out one's good 
thoughts and hurtful thoughts, and keep the 
character in order if one has proved able to 
manage all the little trifling, external be- 
longings." 

This girl's room, then, reflects her deter- 
mination to conquer carelessness in habit 
and thought. With unconscious force she 
is training herself in method, accuracy and 
thoroughness, and these qualities are in- 
valuable in life. 

Her room also shows the refinement of 
her taste. A bookrack on a table contains 



32 



LASELL LEAVES 



volumes by some of her favorite authors. 
-Ruskin's "Sesame and Lilies," Tennyson's 
and Long-fellow's poems, Grimm's "Life of 
Michselangelo," and Dickens' "Old Curios- 
ity Shop" are among them. Beside her bed 
is a small table with a Bible and other de- 
votional books. Two photographs repro- 
ducing the original paintings by the old mas- 
ters, now in the Dresden gallery, hang on 
the wall — Raphael's "Sistine Madonna," 
and Leonardo da Vinci's head of Christ. 
Because she loves the associations attached 
to the celebrated buildings of the world there 
are photographs of the great cathedral of 
Canterbury, England, with its history of 
thirteen centuries; Westminster Abbey, 
London, where are the tombs of kings, 
queens, royal children, poets and statesmen; 
Holyrood palace, Edinburgh, where Man- 
Queen of Scots, lived. The owner of this 
room loves romance, as all girls do, and has 
a photograph of Anne Hathaway's pretty 
little thatched and vine-covered cottage at 
Shottery, near Stratford-on-Avon, in Eng- 
land — the cottage to which Shakespeare of- 
ten walked across the fields in the days of 
his courtship of the one who became his 
wife. — The Delineator. 



Young "Women's Christian Association. 

Religion is not a matter of prayer meet- 
ings only. On coming to college a new girl 
at the Woman's hall asked an older one why 
a certain senior was so popular. "Oh, she 
is so full of fun, and she always has time 
for everybody's troubles, but never has any 
of her own." This senior had learned that 
religion develops every side of a person's 
nature, making one quick to understand the 
trials of others, and teaching him how to 
comfort. She was not a careless student, 
in fact, her work was always promptly and 
thoroughly done, but she never worried 
about her studies, because she felt that re- 



ligion would carry that load for her. She 
had realized to some extent the truth of 
what President Eliot said here — that the on- 
ly true use of knowledge was that of serving 
one's fellow men. 

Religion offers the highest example of 
noble living that can be found, and everyone 
should remember that he can attain no more 
than what he strives for. Moreover, to one 
who is touched by the soft influence of the 
Christ-love, the world is many times more 
beautiful, friends many times dearer, and 
life is much more worth living. 

The Young Women's Christian Associa- 
tion is trying to bring these blessings of re- 
ligion to every girl in college. Perhaps it 
is not what it should be, but perhaps it needs 
your help. It is never too late to begin, 
and surely every little counts. The asso- 
ciation is the only circle in which all the 
girls can mingle, with their common aims 
and desires. Every Christian girl, the one 
who was interested in church matters before 
she came here, and the one who was not, 
should stop and ask herself seriously whether 
it would not be better simply to join the as- 
sociation, if nothing more, than to say when 
she has finished her course — "Not one thing 
did I do in college to share with anyone the 
happiness that came to be from above." — 
Elisabeth Bragdon in The Northwestern. 

* m 

A "WORD TO LASELL SHOPPERS. 

The importance of trading with the firms 
who advertise in the Lasell Leaves can- 
not be overestimated. We should not ex- 
pect their patronage if we do not give them 
our support in return. Another way for 

Lasell girls to be loyal ! 

♦ ♦ 

Any ordinarily bright woman can write 
an essay on Ibsen or mathematical astron- 
omy if she tries hard enough, but it takes a 
genius to keep the cook good-natured. — 
Chicago Times-Herald. 



LASELL LEAVES 



33 



A Choice Blend. 

NEWSPAPERS sometimes mix their 
matter in the rush to get to press. 
Here is an item that recently appeared in an 
Eastern daily : 

"The church was finely decorated with 
holly and evergreen and the altar was hid- 
den in a wealth of flowers. Out of the re- 
cesses rose rare tropical plants, and from the 
ceiling hung fifteen Western veals, which at 
this time of year are scarce and correspond- 
ingly dear at 6 and 8 1-2 cents per lb. There 
was also an active demand for choice lambs, 
and farmers east of the Mississippi River 
can profitably turn to sheep raising and take 
the bride, who wore a gown of white corded 
silk, a creation of Worth's, with pearl orna- 
ments. 

Then came the maid of honor, the cousin 
of the bride, Miss Henrietta Blower, of Chi- 
cago, wearing a dress of white tulle, with 
diamond ornaments, and she was followed 
by a small bunch of Montana sheep, which 
bleated most piteously, as they were driven 
on board and shipped to the winter hotels in 
Bermuda. They will there be cut en traine 
and slightly decollete, and after the rest of 
the party had reached the rail, the minister 
turned and said impressively, T cannot bid 
more than 61-2 cents for state veals, but 
cablegrams from London quote refrigerated 
beef at a price that will enable me to pay 
$4.90 for a car of choice Indian beeves, and 
hearing this there was a rush for the young 
married couple, and the bride fell into the 
arms of her father, who is known to bear a 
striking resemblance to a Connecticut ox, 
weighing 1,875 pounds. The market here 
took an upward turn and advanced 1 to 2 
cents, and the guests, who numbered about 
200, were served with a sumptuous dinner 
at the house of the bride." 

Needless to say, the item created a sensa- 
tion. — Exchange. 



"I 



Painting Her Portrait. 

F I could be such an old lady as that, so 
beautiful, serene, sweet and lovable, 
I shouldn't mind growing old," said a young 
girl the other day, speaking of a white- 
haired visitor who had just departed. 

"Well, if you want to be that kind of an 
old lady, you'd better begin making her right 
now," laughed a keen-witted companion. 
"She doesn't strike me as a piece of work 
that was done in a hurry; it has taken a long 
time to make her what she is. If you are 
going to paint that sort of portrait of your- 
self to leave to the world, you'd better be 
mixing your colors now." 

The merry words were true ; and, whether 
she willed it or not, the girl was already 
"mixing the colors" for her portrait and 
drawing day by day the outlines of her ma- 
ture womanhood which shall yet brighten 
or darken the lives round her. Many a 
careless, selfish girl has in her inmost heart 
no higher ideal than "to be like mother" 
when she shall have reached mother's years; 
but in the meanwhile she is content to be as 
unlike her as possible. She has an idea 
that age brings its graces with it, and that a 
beautiful character comes like silver hair, 
naturally and without effort. 

Girls, you are outlining your future and 
choosing its coloring now. The woman 
you wish to be must begin in the girl. — For- 
ward. 



The Long Skirt and Its Danger. 

A SCIENTIFIC man in Rome has just 
been conducting a very practical ex- 
periment. 

All this time, since the long skirt came 
into fashion, doctors have been talking mi- 
crobes, and warning women of the evil of 
their ways. But has any one thought to 
put a gown under the microscope and give 
visible proof of the truth of what he ha9 



34 



LASELL LEAVES 



been saying? Not a soul, except this 
learned scientist in Rome. 

He employed three young women to take 
their long skirts out on a microbe-collecting 
expedition. When they returned, after do- 
ing their duty thoroughly and well, he took 
the three garments to his laboratory and 
gave them a searching investigation. 

He found all the microbes of the streets. 

The result was horrible to relate. Allied 
in force, the microbes of those three skirts 
were found to be sufficient to contaminate 
the whole population of China, and that is 
more than four hundred and fifty millions. 

Yet the number of these microbes was 

probably no greater than each one of us 

brings into the house every time we go out 

in that article of attire with death in its train. 

The wonder is that we manage to live at all ! 

— Philadelphia Press. 

» »i ■ — 

DROPPED STITCHES. 



Diversity of Growth. 



I dropped a 'Stitch in my knitting 

As I sat at work one day 
And it seemed such a little matter 

I sang as I worked away. 
But lo, when my work my finished, 

I saw with infinite pain 
The stitch I had missed in the morning 

Had rendered it all in vain ! 
That all of my perfect stitches 

Were useless because of one ; 
That one little flaw had cost me 

The loss of my heart's "Well done !" 
Just so it is in our lives, dear, 

But the stitches dropped, ah me ! 
Are part of the soul's own garment 

We weave for eternity. 
The stitch of unbridled passions, 

Of an evil, bitter thought, 
The stitch of neglected duties 

Are into the pattern wrought ! 
The stitch of the first cigar, lad, 

The stitch of your first strong drink, 
And the work of vour life is ruined — 

Does it pay, dear, do you think ? 
Alas ! for the stitch unheeded, 

Ah me, for the mischief done, 

For the glad hopes of the morning, 

For heartache at set of sun ! 

— Selected. 



Although the rate of increase of popula- 
tion for the last decade is about four per 
cent, less than the one immediately preced- 
ing it, the actual increase of population ex- 
ceeds that shown by the census of 1890 by 
266,726. Again, while the average rate 
is 21 per cent., Idaho shows a gain of 92 
per cent., Montana 84 per cent., and North 
Dakota 75 per cent. ; while Maine has only 
gained 5 per cent., Kansas 3 per cent., Ne- 
braska 1 per cent., and Nevada shows a de- 
crease of population. The Territory of 
Oklahoma shows the most astonishing 
growth, having increased its population 
from 61.834 in 1890, to 398,245 in 1900 — a 
gain of 550 per cent. New York is still the 
Empire State, with a population of 7,268,- 
009; Pennsylvania, Illinois, Ohio, Missouri, 
are second, third, fourth and fifth in order. 
Texas has passed Massachusetts, and is now 
the sixth State in the Union in point of popu- 
lation. The results of the latest enumera- 
tion have been reached so quickly because of 
the improvement in tabulating machines. 
The work is nearly a full year ahead of that 

of the preceding census. 

» a 

The Centre of Population. 



One curious revelation of the new census 
is that the centre of population has moved 
but slightly since ten years ago, and it will 
require a nicer calculation than is yet possi- 
ble to determine whether it has moved west- 
ward or eastward. For a long period it had 
been steadily moving westward, and by the 
last census it was found to be a little west of 
south of Greensburg in Indiana. By this 
census it appears that the states wholly west 
of the longitude of that point have increased 
almost precisely the same as the states lying 
wholly east of it, about 6,000,000 each. The 
remaining 1,325,000 increase is in states 



LASELL LEAVES 



35 



which the meridan passes through, and not 

until the increases in the east and west parts 

of these are determined will it be known 

what and in what direction the change is. 

The eastern and western halves of the nation 

appear to be increasing in population with 

remarkable evenness. It is possible that 

the northern or southern movement of the 

centre may be greater than the eastern or 

western movement, and perhaps it will be 

found that the movement is really farther 

from the centre of ten years ago than is 

now thought probable. 

» » 

Taken from the editorial in School Life: 

Everyone born into the world is destined 

to belong to one of two classes : either he 

will be a leader, or he will be led. It is 

the large majority, we shall find, that are 

led; it is the very few who lead. Yet to 

those few who are called to leadership is 

given an influence so great, that they control 

and shape the characteristics of all. 

* m 

Leadership is a necessity. When right 
and efficient, it stimulates growth and 
"makes the world go round." When in- 
competent and bad, it militates inestimably 
for evil. What a responsibility, therefore, 
rests upon those into whose hands are placed 
such agencies of might for right or wrong, 
and how time reviews their every act and 
judges them! — From the Editorial of 
School Life. 

m m 

Taken from R. M. T. S. Register, Scien- 
tific Notes : 

The Smithsonian Institute at Washing- 
ton will shortly possess the most rapid 
camera in the world. It is designed to take 
a successful negative with an exposure of 
one six-hundredth of a second, and it is 
hoped that this may be increased so that a 
negative may be obtained in one one-thous- 
andth of a second. 



EXPANSION. 

Met a feller t'other mornin' — 

Most amusin' sort o' cuss ; 
He'd a curus style about him — 

Cert'n'y couldn't well be wuss. 
I says: "Where you hail f'm pardner?" 

An' he smiles in knowin' way 
An' replies in forren lingo : 

"Porto Rico, U. S. A." 

Seen a feller down on Broadway 

With a shockin' head o' hair, 
An' a lot o' tropic garments, 

An' a most outlandish air. 
"Where's he frum?" a feller shouted, 

But before we'd time to say, 
This yere heathen turned an' answered : 

"Honolulu, U. S. A." 

Met a feller down at Olive 

With a somber-ero on, 
Had a lot o' shaggy whiskers, 

Nearly all his clothin' gone. 
Stopped and asked me for a quarter ; 

Says : "My home is fur away." 
"Where you frum ?" The varmint answered : 

"Santiago, U. S. A." 

Seen a feller at the Southern, 

With a heavy iron box ; 
Overcoat was lined with bearskin ; 

Wore a dozen pair o' sox. 
Sized him up to be a miner, 

Judging by his award way ; 
Seen him write in big characters : 

"Dawson City, U. S. A." 

Seen a saddle-colored heathen, 

Wearin' earrings in his nose, 
Linen cuffs around his ankles; 

Most indecent lack o' close. 
"Where'd this heathen guy yere spring frum?" 

I inquired in lofty way; 
An' he had the nerve to answer : 

"Frum Manila, U. S. A." 

Gee ! I says, I never heard of 

These yer cannybuls before ! 
Are these heathens yere all voters, 

Will we stan' fur any more? 
Next you know you ask a feller 

Where he's frum an' he will say, 
With a lordly kind o' flourish : 

"All creation, U. S. A." 

— Ed. Sabin, in the Saddlery News. 



36 



LASELL LEAVES 




PERSONALS. 

—Emma Goll Dacy, ('98), sends clipping 
stating that the suit brought by her mother 
against the Metropolitan West Side Elevated 
Road of Chicago, to secure damages for de- 
preciation of the value of her property due to 
the extension of that road across Ashland 
Boulevard, has been decided in her favor, 
the amount of damages awarded being 
$7<75°- Mr. Dacy was the prosecuting at- 
torney, and it was due to his skilful conduct 
of the suit that it was not lost, as has been 
the case in all other similar suits, excepting 
only that of St. Jarlath's Church, and F. 
Samuel Whitowski, in which liability of the 
company was affirmed, and damages exacted 
to the amount of $10,000, and $3,000, re- 
spectively. Grace Allen, ( '95 ), Emma tells 
us, was in the city (Chicago) in October, to 
attend the wedding of Alice Drake, an old 
Omaha friend of hers. Emma expected to 
see her during her stay. 

—Laura Birdsey and Elizabeth Starks 
called to see us one day towards the end of 
October. They looked unusually well, and 
were very evidently in the best of spirits. 
Laura is at home this fall — she was here only 
on a short visit — and is devoting herself to 
music, in which she hopes to do something 
really worth while. Elizabeth is taking a 
course in physical culture, in Boston, and 
it seems as if this were the one thing she has 
been needing to make her good and strong, 
for she hardly looks like the same girl. 
Rosy and well, too, is Ida Trowbridge now. 



She paid us a flying visit at about the same 
time. She regrets her inability to grad- 
uate this year with her class, but is so much 
better in health than she was, that she finds 
ample consolation in that fact. At a recent 
entertainment in her home city, Ida contri- 
buted to the evening's enjoyment by giving 
several readings, which were appreciatively 
received. Bessie Roper came one day, and 
Grace and Ethel Loud with her. We were 
glad to have them with us again, even 
though but for so short a time. 

— Clara Robbins sends subscription for 
Leaves, and speaks of being very busy at 
home this fall. 

— Bessie Phelps Yocum sends news of the 
arrival at her home, on October 12, of a 
very little boy, Ezra Phelps Yocum. Our 
congratulations. 

— Jessie Kemp writes that her mother is 
now well on the way to complete recovery 
from her illness of last August. Her lit- 
tle brother, William, they have recently 
placed in the Curtis School for Boys, Brook- 
field Centre, Conn., and Jessie feels quite 
content, feeling convinced that it is just the 
place for him. She says she is still hop- 
ing to return to us and finish her course. 

— Corinne Salisbury also sends Leaves 
subscription, being anxious to keep track of 
us all. 

— Isabel Bronson Johnston was here with 
her new husband, who seems to be a manly 
fellow. We think they will be happy and 
useful. They will not go to housekeeping 
until a new house is built. 

— LaVerne Reynolds and Helen Abbott 
are teaching music in their respective homes, 
and doing well at it, too. We were glad 
to see their bright faces one day in October. 

— Marion Gage is to begin to study the 
science and art of nursing, in February, she 
tells us, here at the Newton Hospital. We 
wish her all success. Cecile, she further 



LASELL LEAVES 



37 



says, is teaching a small private class in 
Brookline. 

— Grace Etherington, of the New York 
Lasell Club, sends good wishes for this 
school year. She has the interests of the 
club very much at heart, and is working in 
her usual energetic way for its success. 

— Annie Hackett is librarian of the High 
School in her town. Frank Bowman, she 
says, has had a fine trip to the Yellowstone. 
Annie sends Leaves subscription. 

— Edith Atwood is at Melrose, Mass., for 
the winter. 

— Olive Smith has been teaching at Ash- 
land, Maine, and is considered a very suc- 
cessful teacher. She is to enter the Emer- 
son College of Oratory this year, so we learn 
from a timely newspaper clipping. 

— Anna Howe Shipley, whose daughter 
Alice is now at National Park Seminary, un- 
der care of our old friends, Mr. and Mrs. 
Cassedy, writes us of the birth, on June 15, 
of a third daughter, whom they call Helen 
Virginia, "the most welcome little girl in all 
the world." 

— May Hayward, here last year, is teach- 
ing this year, we learn, and likes the work 
very much. 

— Through a recent letter from the prin- 
cipal of Quincy Mansion School, we hear 
that Bettie Morris Shearn's young daughter 
Cora, whose application to enter Lasell this 
fall came to our regret too late, is winning 
golden opinions there. Evidently she is 
Bettie's own daughter. 

— Grace Richardson regrets not being 
with us again this year, but is on the whole 
contented and happy as her father's house- 
keeper, and has a very appreciative word to 
say about the value of her cooking lessons 
here. The knowledge gained stands her in 
good stead now. 

— Mrs. Mara L. Pratt Chadwick, who in 
former years taught physiological psychol- 



ogy here, is at Maiden for the winter. Her 
marriage occurred last spring, and the loss 
of her husband by appendicitis but a short 
time after. 

— A pleasant letter from Isabel Ginn and 
Emeroy tells us that they are both at home 
now with their father, busy with home 
duties, yet remembering very kindly Lasell 
and Lasell friends, to keep in touch with 
whom they send subscription to the Leaves. 
Claire Beebe and Helen Holman, they have 
heard, are both to be married this month. 

— Mr. Bragdon regrets that through in- 
advertence, the notice of Jane Myrick's mar- 
riage did not receive notice in the October 
Leaves. 

— Ethel Walton ('99) is boarding at Mrs. 
Parker's ('58) and enjoys it while pursuing 
her law course. 

— Alice Mayo Hicks, here years ago, 
sends us a program of what must have been 
a very diverting German entertainment, 
given on Monday evening, October 29, in 
High School Hall, Needham. An amusing 
little German drama, "English Spoken 
Here," was presented, in which Alice took 
the part of "Frau Kaufmann." 

— An interesting clipping has been sent 
us giving an account of Eva Ferris Foote's 
wedding, on the fifth of September. It 
was a church wedding, and "the largest ever 
held in the South Norwalk Congregational 
Church," by report. Of beautiful decora- 
tions, and all the other accompaniments of a 
fashionable wedding", there was no lack; a 
reception followed at the bride's home. Her 
father's gift to Eva was a pretty residence 
at 6 Taylor avenue, South Norwalk. 

— Carita Curtis, ('99) we learn through 
Ella Cotton, is in Omaha now. She ex- 
pects to make her debut soon. 

— Alice Kimball ('98) is in Boston for 
the winter. 

— Agnes Flaherty ('00), is in Cambridge, 



38 



LASELL LEAVES 



studying vocal music under Miss White. 

— Elizabeth Hitchcock, they say, is en- 
gaged to a Chicago gentleman. 

— Sallie Ellwood Wirt is to make New 
York her home shortly. 

— Eva Kennard Wallace is keeping house 
in London, England. 

— Genevieve Slayton is also in London, 
and expects soon to go to Germany to study 
art. 

— Inez Hill Staples has a dear little 
daughter born recently. She lives at Bidde- 
ford, Maine. 

— Albert E. Dacy, Emma Goll Dacy's hus- 
band, is quoted in one of the Chicago papers 
as having put a question to Mr. Bryan at a 
certain recent political meeting in that city, 
to which the Democratic candidate did not 
reply, but cautiously took refuge in beating 
about the bush instead. Mr. Bryan was 
talking about "the consent of the governed," 
when Mr. Dacy asked, "How about North 
Carolina?" At another meeting, Mr. 
Dacy discussed the issues of the late political 
campaign, with Mr. Dobyns, in the presence 
of the largest crowd gathered at the City 
Hall during the whole campaign. 

— Minnie Buchrach announces her en- 
gagement to Mr. Benjamin Deutsch. 

— Nellie LaSelle writes of having seen 
Mae Burr and Lil Tukey Morrison recently. 
Mae took part in a flower parade in Lincoln 
the other day, riding in a trap decorated 
with pink and white chrysanthemums, and 
showering confetti on her Lasell friends 
(among others) "for dear old Lasell." A 
certain lady of Nellie's acquaintance said to 
her on one occasion, "I've known a great 
many girls from Lasell, and I've never heard 
one unpleasant thing about it." Nell says, 
"I felt real proud." 

— Alice Mayo Hicks called to see us one 
day early this month. It was such a pleas- 
ure! 



— We are genuinely sorry that Grace 
Tirrell's health will not permit her contin- 
uing her school course. The doctor ad- 
vises a change of climate. Our best wishes 
go with her. 

— Mabel Lutes was expecting soon to go 
to St. Louis at last accounts. 

— Mr. Bragdon's brother, Mr. George E. 
Bragdon, and his wife, recently entertained 
at their home in Pueblo, Colo., Secretary of 
the Navy, John D. Long. In the course of 
a speech made by the Secretary at that time 
he said, "The best argument that the various 
departments of the government have been 
well administered, is the fact that they are 
not brought into the campaign as issues." 

— Flossy Stedman Richards is now in her 
own home in Needham, and thinks her baby 
boy, born August 9, is the greatest boy in 
the world. 

— Mr. Bragdon has a comfortable reason 
to know that apples from Manistee, Michi- 
gan are very, very good. 

— Bess Shepherd ('94) is teaching 
Modern Languages in Simpson College, In- 
dianola, Iowa. She reports it a wide-awake 
school of over four hundred students, co- 
educational. She will be glad to hear from 
and see some of the old girls who live in that 
region, and sends greetings. 

— Bessie Towle Waters of Somerville, 
Nina Burr Day of Newark, N. J.; Millie 
Swan Hall and Emma Gass Moody of Cam- 
bridge, called to see Mr. Bragdon in Octo- 
ber. Bessie Waters and Emma Moody 
have each three beautiful children. They 
report Theresa Hollander Wrightington liv- 
ing in Longwood. 

— Wheeling, W. Va., Nov. 7, 1900. — 
West Virginia has gone Republican by from 
12,000 to 15,000 majority. The entire state 
ticket is elected. The congressional dele- 
gation is solidly Republican. This means 
that our Katherine White's father is Gover- 
nor. 



LASELL LEAVES 



39 



MARRIAGES. 

— Jane My rick, ('98), to George Slocomb 
Gibbs, on Thursday, August 30, at Jamaica 
Plain, Mass. Address, Aldworth street, 
Jamaica Plain. 

— Gertrude Amelia Jones, ('97), to 
Thomas Martin James, on Thursday, Octo- 
ber 11, at Kansas City, Mo. 

— Alma Avis Claflin to Harry Dunning 
Banta, on Tuesday, October 16, at Boston, 
Mass. Address after December 1 : Rock- 
view, Rockview street, Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

— Jennie Miller Arnold, ('93), to George 

Ropes Felt, on Wednesday, October 31, at 

Peabody, Mass. 

— Ella Fredonia Ampt, ('96), to Carl A. 

Hamann, on Wednesday, October 31, at 

Wyoming, Ohio. Address after January 

1 : 744 Prospect street, Cleveland, Ohio. 

— Mary Brownell Davis to Alfred Doug- 
las Flinn, on Thursday, November 1, at Bos- 
ton, Mass. Address after January 1 : 984 
Beacon street, Newton Centre, Mass. 

— Edna Mae Makepeace to Aldro Amos 
French, on Wednesday, November 7, at At- 
tleboro, Mass. 

— Edna Mary Dice, to Charles Maxwell 
Robertson, on Tuesday, Nov. 17, at Craw- 
fordsville, Indiana. Address after Decem- 
ber 18: The Wallingford, Indianapolis. 

m m 

Lasell Song. 

Why must Lasell forever lack a song? 
There are musical people enough, and peo- 
ple enough who can make a simple rhyme, 
such as that ought to be. Some have made 
some very respectable Lasell Songs, but the 
one that has struck the popular fancy, the 
singable Lasell Song, has yet to be written. 
A good deal of name in Lasell history is 
waiting for the teacher or pupil who shall 
bring this to pass. Sentiment that is over- 
wrought, or too elaborately worked out, will 
not meet the case. It wants some simple, 
sensible words, set to a music that sings it- 
self. C. C. B. 




LDCA L5 



October 11. — The dinner hour was enliv- 
ened by the music of a very good orchestra, 
and during the evening the music was con- 
tinued in the gymnasium until study hour, 
the girls enjoying several good dances mean- 
while. The party of fifteen girls who went 
on this same evening with Mr. Bragdon to 
see Sothern in "Hamlet," regretted doubt- 
less that they must miss this good music, but 
felt that to see the great tragedy well played 
would compensate amply for this loss. The 
party was rather smaller than Lasell theatre 
parties usually are, for many thought that 
on account of the length of the play, it would 
be necessary to leave before the last act, and 
hence concluded not to go. Those who 
went, however, were able to stay through 
even the last scene. The part of Hamlet 
was admirably acted, although all who had 
seen Irving admitted that Sothern was not 
so successful as that actor in interpreting this 
great character. All the girls, nevertheless, 
enjoyed the play immensely, and came awav 
with heightened interest in that great author 
whose plays are as enthusiastically received 
today as they were when first presented. 



40 



LASELL LEAVES 



October 13. — After all recitations were 
over, Mr. Bragdon took a large party of girls 
to the Yale-Dartmouth foot ball game at the 
Newton Athletic Grounds. Although the 
teams were very unevenly matched, the Yale 
men being stronger and in better condition 
than the Dartmouth, the latter fought brave- 
ly and kept the score below twenty, though 
few thought they would do so, the result be- 
ing 17-0. After the game a special car 
brought our Lasell party back. All were 
much pleased with the afternoon, and even 
the Dartmouth girls admitted having had a 
good time. 

On the evening of this day occurred the 
golf dance, given by the seniors to the ju- 
niors. It was the most "informal" affair 
of the year, thus far. The girls appeared 
in the gymnasium in their golf skirts, their 
shirt waists turned in at the necks and rolled 
up at the elbows, and with their warm golf 
capes thrown about them. The reason for 
this careful wrapping up was not obvious, 
even though some of them had come as far 
as from the third floor. The gentlemen, 
who were naturally the escorts, and who 
were easily distinguished by the handker- 
chiefs tied around their right arms, gallant- 
ly hung the numerous capes on the chest- 
weight machines, and began filling out the 
programs, which were decorated with de- 
signs of golf clubs and balls, the work of an 
artistic senior. Aside from the brilliant 
display of golf capes, the gymnasium was ar- 
tistically adorned with golf bags and clubs, 
which decorations were admired during the 
leisure moments by the young ladies who re- 
clined on the numerous divans, evolved from 
convenient steps, and classroom benches, by 
means of sundry rugs and pillows. After 
the first grand march and circle, and between 
the various dances, lanciers, waltzs, and two- 
steps, the corner of the gymnasium where 
the lemonade was to be had, was the most 



frequented spot in the room. At 9.15 the 
gentlemen and ladies left as promptly as 
they had come, and in each corridor, before 
the final good nights were said, each ex- 
pressed great enjoyment of the evening. 

October 15.— A party of girls from the 
school went on an all day's trip to Salem. 
They first stopped at the Peabody Academy 
of Science, which contains collections of ani- 
mals, minerals, rocks and various kinds of 
wood. After which they visited in turn the 
Essex Institute, what remains of the first 
church in Salem; the home of Mr. Peabody. 
a noted English merchant; and, while driv- 
ing around the town, saw the house where 
Hawthorne was born, and also the supposed 
"House of Seven Gables." Then the Salem 
Court House, the home of Roger Williams, 
the "Witchcraft House," and the Old Bak- 
ery were also visited. It was time to return 
home after seeing these, and all felt well re- 
paid for their day's excursion. 

Tuesday evening, October 16, brought 
a treat to a party of the music-loving ones 
among us, in the shape of a fine organ re- 
cital at Shawmut Congregational church, by 
Mr. Henry M. Dunham, our teacher of or- 
gan, assisted by his brother, Mr. William H. 
Dunham, tenor. Miss Alice Siever was the 
accompanist. The program follows : 

Sonata in C. minor (No. 5). 

Adagio. Finale. 

"Liebeslied" from "Die Walkure" 

Prelude in C minor 

"Pr ovine alisch" 

a. Prelndio 

b. Intermezzo 

a. "Drink to me only" 

b. "Tom Bowling" 

Adagio (from Symphony No. 6) 

Pastorale 



Guilmant, 

Wagner, 
Bach, 

Rheinberger, 
Dunham, 

(17th Century). 
Dibdin, 
Widor, 
Marty, 



Whiting, Sonata in A minor (first movement) 

October 22. — In the afternoon Mr. Brag- 
don took those who wished to go, on an ex- 
cursion to historic Boston. Our party, 
consisting of seventeen, left the Seminary 



LASELL LEAVES 



4i 



directly after lunch, and returned in time 
for dinner. Among the interesting places 
visited may be mentioned the Old South 
Church, Faneuil Hall, the Boston Museum, 
King's Chapel, and Hancock Tavern. An 
object of especial interest was the Old North 
Church, in the belfry of which the lanterns 
were hung out as a signal for Paul Revere. 

October 25. — Friday evening a few went 
into Boston to hear Leland T. Powers give 
selections from "The Taming of the Shrew." 
The recital closed with "David Copperfield's 
Courtship of Dora." Mr. Powers is one 
of the best impersonators of the day, and re- 
cites in a very attractive manner. All who 
went felt well repaid by so enjoyable an 
evening. 

October 27. — As Hallowe'en came in the 
middle of the week this year, the seniors 
chose the previous Saturday evening for 
their "Hallowe'en Poverty Party," to which 
all the school were invited. At seven 
o'clock a long line of girls danced into the 
gymnasium, which was lighted only by sun- 
dry pumpkin lanterns, a hurdy-gurdy play- 
ing the march. All wore black masks, and 
wierd, indeed, they looked in the dim light 
of the grinning lanterns. Upon the stage 
was a gypsy tent, in front of which sat 
Marinette Ramsdell, dressed as an old witch, 
and armed with a small broom to dust away 
the cobwebs, according to Mother Goose. 
Close by was her kettle, suspended from a 
tripod, in which magic potions were doubt- 
less brewing! Over by the open fireplace 
the fire upon the hearth burned vigorously, 
and on either side of the chimney were ap- 
ples, chestnuts and pop-corn in abundance, 
while other apples were suspended by strings 
here and there around the gymnasium, and 
some were alluringly floating in a tub of 
water, where anyone who wished might 
"bob" for them. Pretty soon the electric 
lights were turned on, and all joined in the 



grand march, after which the girls un- 
masked. The evening was spent in danc- 
ing, popping corn, roasting chestnuts, hear- 
ing futures from the old witch, and playing 
the usual hallowe'en games. Just before 
we all dispersed, Dr. Winslow took several 
flashlight pictures of the girls grouped about 
the stage. 

October 30. — A joint recital which some 
of us attended, escorted by Mr. Brag-don, 
was given in Symphony Hall, by Mrs. Kath- 
arine Fisk, contralto; Miss Leonora Jack- 
son, violinist, and Mr. Clarence Eddy, or- 
ganist. Miss Jackson, a violinist of some 
note, played charmingly. 

October 31. — As Hallowe'en was cele- 
brated the Saturday before by the poverty 
party, not much of special interest occurred 
on this evening. At dinner each table had 
a Hallowe'en cake, containing either a ring 
or a thimble, which afforded a great deal of 
amusement. Just as the clock struck ten, 
all the doors began to slam, as though a 
powerful gust of wind had swept down the 
corridors. This was succeeded by a great 
calm, which lasted until twelve o'clock, when 
some stray ghost, wishing to celebrate more 
than the others, rang the Chinese gong, to 
welcome in the first of November, the month 
of Thanksgiving. 

m m 

A Notable Anniversary. 

Of especial interest to Lasell was the 
fiftieth wedding anniversary, celebrated in 
August, of Rev. and Mrs. Charles W. Cush- 
ing, of Rochester, N. Y. Mr. Cushing was 
the third principal of Lasell, holding that 
position from 1863 to 1874, at which time, 
retiring from the management of the school 
he was succeeded by Mr. Bragdon. The 
celebration took place on the fourteenth of 
August, Mr. Bragdon and family being in- 
vited, as also Miss Carpenter and Miss Blais- 
dell, who were here during Mr. Cushing's 
principalship. 



42 



LASELL LEAVES 



FRENCH. 

A young man would like to teach a class in con- 
versational French. Is well recommended, and uses 
best method. Class of beginners or more advanced 
pupils, $1.00 per hour for four persons or less; .25 for 
each additional member. Please -address C. Car- 
pouthian, Needham, Mass. 

Our former pupil, Mrs. Alice Mayo Hicks, vouches 
for Mr. Carpouthian in every way, and on her word 
we commend him to those desiring a teacher who can 
come to a home. 



PUPILS BY 

Massachusetts, 41 

New York, 12 

Pennsylvania, 12 

Connecticut, 11 

Ohio, 11 

Illinois, 9 

Maine, 6 

New Hampshire, 6 

Iowa, 6 

Vermont, 5 

Texas, 5 

Colorado, 4 

Montana, 3 

New Jersey, 3 

California, 3 



STATES. 

Indiana, 

Missouri, 

Minnesota, 

Rhode Island, 

Nebraska, 

Michigan, 

Kansas, 

India, 

Kentucky, 

Cape Breton, 

Canada, 

Utah, 

Wisconsin, 

W. Virginia, 

Washington, 



3 
3 
3 

2 
2 
2 

2 



Foot Anatomy. 

Is a branch of science that the skilled sboe 
maker has to thoroughly master. The 
makers of 




have, after years of experience, acquired a 
knowledge enabling them to produce shoes 
that have a snug, glove-like fit at the heel, 
ankle and instep, seldom found even in the 
finest custom-made shoes, and they reveal a 
style and individuality of their own which all 
good dressers appreciate. 

(Forty styles in all Leathers.) 



Always 



S3.50 



Tair. 




Business Established 1817. 




PRAY & SONS CO. 



Wholesale and retail dealers in 



CARPETS -A-isro ZR,TTC3-S 



of Doth Foreign and Domestic Manufacture; also 



Curtains, Draperies, Portieres 



and all 

descriptions 

of choice 



Upholstery Fabrics, 



(^"■PRICES ALWAYS MODERATE.^ 



J-OHUsT ZE3L ZFIR^IT & SOITS CO., 

Oldest and Largest Carpet House in STew England. 

PRAY BUILDING, Opposite Boylston St. 

6 5 8 WASHINGTON STREET, BOSTON. 6 5 8 



LASELL LEAVES 



43 




CHAHQES 



The exchange column in a school paper 
should be an important one, for through this 
column we are able to keep in touch with the 
students of other institutions. The ex- 
changes are placed in the library, and after 
they have been read, they may be had by any 
of the students. 

This month we have received the follow- 
ing papers : The Mount Holyoke, The 
Mirror, The Shamrock, The Polymnian, 
The Wesleyan Literary Monthly, The Ar- 
gosy, The Harvard Lampoon, The Pennsyl- 
vanian, The Crescent, The Pennant, The 
Yale Review, and The Bowdoin Quill. 



SUBSCRIBE NOW. 

Now is the time to send in your sub- 
scription to the Leaves, girls. You all enjoy 
the items about the girls you knew here, and 
should not deprive yourself of this bond of 
union with your old friends and your school 
home. If you have any news of yourself, or 
of any of the girls, let us have it for our 
"Personals." We thank those who have 
already done this. 

Eo Jo States^ 

vi^rt INeedlework, Sofa "Pillows, 

Banners, etc. 

175 TREMONT ST. (Near Tremont Theatre.) 

BONBON5 

CHOCOLATE^ 

Delicious Ice Crearp Soda. 




145 TREMONT STREET, 



BOSTON, MASS. 



**-^^^^^^^^^^s<nMiBr**i:*K*j^-^^^ll- 



THE BEST IS NONE TOO GOOD 
FOR A LASELL GIRL. 




WE have been chosen to make, for MEMBERS OF THE CLASS OF 1901, the BEST 
and MOST ARTISTIC PHOTOGRAPHS they have ever had. 
Members of other classes will be given a VERY LOW SCHOOL RATE upon our 
HIGH ART PRODUCTIONS. 

2i WEST STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 



44 



LASELL LEAVES 



FREEMAN & FLETCHER, 

THE FLORISTS. 

12 CHARLES STREET, AUBURNDALE. 

Nearest Greenhouses to Lasell. 

Long Distance Telephone. 

Mrs. C. H. HALL, 

DRESSMAKER. 

Work done at reasonable prioes. 

Special rates to students. 

490 AUBURN STREET, AUBURNDALE. 



SHOES FOB 
YOUNG LADIES. 

Newest Shapes. Newest Styles for Gym- 
nasium,, Tennis, Walking and Dress. 

WE GIVE TEN PER CENT. DISCOUNT 
TO ALL LASELL STUDENTS. 

THE HENRY H. 
TTJTTLE CO., 

Cor. WASHINGTON and WINTER STS., 
BOSTON. 



SPKI^GEH B$OS. CO. 
CliOflK, SUIT and pU$ HOUSE 

155 THEMONT STREET, NEAR WEST STREET. 

Ladies' Coats, Capes, Suits, Furs, Golf Capes, Golf Skirts, Walking 

Skirts, Waists, Traveling Rugs, etc. 

Superior Grade Furs a Specialty. Discount to Students. 

NEW CUSTOM DEPARTMENT. FINEST IN THE CITY. SKILLED MANAGEMENT. 
COURTEOUS ATTENTION. PROMPT EXECUTION OF ORDERS. 



Adami^ <8e Grill>ert, 

OPTICIANS. 

MANUFACTURERS of Spectacles and Eye Glasses, and Im- 
porters of Opera, Field and Marine Glasses and Optical 
Goods of every description. Oculists' prescription work a 
specialty. 

165 Tremont Street, Boston. 

FIRST NATIONAL. BANK 

OF WEST NEWTON, MASS. 

James H. Nickerson, Pres. A. R. Mitchell, Vice-Pres. 

Edward P. Hatch, Cashier. 

General Banking, Collection and Exchange. 
Capital, $100,000. 

Business hours dailv, 8.30 to 12 a. m. and 1 to 3 p. m. 
Saturdays, 8.30 a. m. to 12 m. Safe deposit boxes to rent in 
new lire and burglar proof vault. 

ELLIOT W. KEYES 



TAYLOR BLOCK, 



AUBURNDALE. 



Apothecary. 



Drugs, Medicines and Toilet Articles. 
California Perfumes. Confections. 



Rockwell, and Churchill. 



PRINTERS 

THIRTY-NINE ARCH STREET, 
BOSTON, MASS. 



SCHOOL ANNUALS, 
ANNOUNCEMENTS, 
CATALOGUES. 



PRINTERS OF LASELL CATALOGUE. 



C. RAYMOND di LUC CI, 
CHOICE FRUITS, CANDY, NUTS, ETC. 

C GARS andITOBACCO. 

365 AUBURN STREET, corner ASH STREE1 

AUBURNDALE, MASS. 



MUTTON, LAMB, VEAL, 

POULTRY and GAME 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL. 

Stalls 13 and 15, Faneuil Hall Market, Boston. 

Telephone connection. 



George W. Kimball & Co., 

Wholesale and retail dealers in 

Poultry, Game, Beef, Mutton, Lamb and Veal. 

Basement, No. 32a North Street, opposite Merchants' 
Row, Boston. 

Telephone 927 Haymarket. 
Howard M. Smith. Albert P. Smith. 

SMITH BROTHERS. 

(Successors to Geo. H. Phil brook & Co.) 

Butter, Cheese, Eg-g-s 

Stalls No. 2 aiid 4, 
Faneuil Hall Market, Boston, Mass. 

Telephone, Haymarket 884. 



LASELL LEAVES 



45 




Ladies' Shirt and Golf Waists, 
$5.00 to $20.00. 

From Madras, Oxfords, Cheviot, French 
Percales, English and French Flannels, 
Silk and Moire Poplin. 



Blanket Wraps 

For the Nursery. 
For the Sick Room. 
For the Bath. 

For Steamer Traveling. 
For the Railway Carriage. 
For Yachting. 
For Men, Women, Children and the 
Baby, $2.75 to $35, with Hood and 
Girdle complete. 



A Special Department for 

Ladies' Golf Waists, 
Bicycle and Golf Skirts, 
Entire Golfing Suits. 

GOLF CLUBS, 
GOLF BALLS and 
CADDY BAGS. 




NOYES BROS. 

Washington and Summer Streets, 

BOSTON, Mass., U. S. A. 



FURS. 



FURS. 



COLLARETTES, 
STORM COLLARS, 
SCARFS and MUFFS. 



SPECIAL DISCOUNT TO LASELL 

STUDENTS. 



Edw. Kakas & Sons 

162 Tremont St. 



DAVIS, CHAPIN CO. 

J. A. BARKER, President. 

Commission Merchants and Wholesale 
Dealers in Foreign and Domestic 

Fruits and Produce. 

83 and 85 Faneuil Hall Market, 

Cellar 15 South Side, 

Boston, Mass. 

Telephone Haymarket 777. 



MILLS & DEERING, 

Receivers and Dealers in Fine Grades of 

BUTTER 

AND STRICTLY FRESH EGGS. 

CHAS. W. HBCCINS, 

Choice Family Groceries. 

Teas, Coffees, Spices, Canned Goods, Fancy 
Crackers, Fruit, Nuts and Confections. 

Davis Block, 417 Auburn St., Auburndale. 



4 6 



LASELL LEAVES 



JOSHUA THORNDIKE. 



CHAS. W. SPEAR 



JOSHUA THORNDIKE & CO. 



DEALERS IN 



MUTTON, LAMB and VEAL 

Stalls 3 and 5 New Faneuil Hall Market, 
BOSTON, MASS. 

Edward E. Babb & Co. 

25 Arch St., Boston, Mass. 

Dealers in 

SCHOOL BOOKS and SCHOOL SUPPLIES 

O. A. HOWE 

273 MAIN STREET, WORCESTER, MASS. 

WHOLESALE GROCER. 

Gallons Canned Goods of all kinds and of the best 
quality a specialty. Teas and Coffees. 



Dr. GEORGE A. BATES, 

TAYLOR BLOCK, AUBURNDALE. 

DENTIST. 

Office hours. — Mondays, Wednesdays, Thursdays 
and Saturdays, 8 a. m. to 4 p. m. 



If YOU Wish to BUV Sen <* t0 " s for prices or 

other information. We 
y, carry the largest stock of 
2[ any store in New England, 
and can furnish any books 
in print at the shortest 
notice. We can save you 
money. Catalogue of special bargains mailed free. 



DE WOIiFE, FlSKE & CO. 
361 and 365 Washington St., Boston, Mass. 



Bty 






& Y :»a^FARM£ftFy 




TBA06 MAB»_. 



FINEST ROAD-BED ON THE CONTINENT. 



Boston and Albany Railroad. 



THROUGH CAR SERVICE IN EFFECT SEPTEMBER 20, 1900. 



No. 7 — Leaves Boston at 8.30 a. m. except Sunday. Wagner buffet drawing-room car, Boston to Albany. 
No. 15 — Leaves Boston at 10.45 a. m. daily. Wagner vestibuled buffet library-smoking car and vestibuled 

sleeping cars. Boston to Chicago, via L. S. & M. S. R. R. to St. Loui's via Big Four 

Route. Dining car service. 
No. 19 — Leaves Boston at 2.00 p. m. daily. The North Shore Special Wagner buffet vestibuled sleeping 

cars, Boston to Cleveland and Chicago. , 

No. 23 — Leaves Boston at 3.30 p. m. except Sunday. Wagner buffet vestibuled 'sleeping cars, Boston to 

Niagara Falls. Tourist sleeping car Boston to Chicago. 
No. 37 — Leaves Boston at 6.00 p. m. daily. Wagner vestibuled sleeping car, Boston to Cleveland and 

Cincinnati via L. S. & M. S. R. R. ; also Wagner vestibuled sleeping car, Boston to Detroit 

and Chicago via M. C. R. R. 
No. 63 — Leaves Boston at 11.00 p. m., except Saturday. Wagner sleeping car, Boston to Albany, arriv- 
ing at 7.57 a. m. 
For information, maps, time-tables, tickets and accommodations in drawing-room and sleeping cars, 
apply to agents of Boston & Albany Railroad at its several stations. 

J. L. WHITE, City Pass, and Ticket Agent, or to A. S. HANSON, Gen. Pass. Agent. 

The only first-class through line from New England to the West. 



City Ticket Office, 366 Washington St., Boston 



LASELL LEAVES 



47 




COTRELL I LEONARD, 

ALBANY, N. Y. 

MAKERS OF 

CAPS, GOWNS and HOODS 

to the American Universities and to 
Lasell Seminary. Illustrated Man- 
ual, Samples, etc., upon application. 



PLEASE FORWARD GOODS BY 

JOHNSON & KEYES EXPRESS CO. 

AUBURNDALE AND BOSTON EXPRESS. 

Offices: 34 Court Sq., 77 Kingston, 105 Arch Streets 
BOSTON. 

WAUWINET FARM. 

COMMONWEALTH AVE. AND VALENTINE ST., 

WEST NEWTON, MASS. 
All interested in a modern Dairy are invited to visit the Farm. 



DEALER IN 



PROVISIONS, 

Corner Auburn and Lexington Streets, 

.Auburndale, Mass. 



Established 1830 

Alfred Mudge & Son 
PRINTERS 

24 Franklin Street, Boston 

CLASS PRINTING 
A SPECIALTY 



A_ndrew J. Lloyd <fc Co. 
OPTICIANS 

DOWN-TOWN— 323 Washington St., opp. Old South Church. 

BACK BAY-310 Boylston St., opp. Arlington St. 

Bring your prescriptions for Eyeglasses and Spectacles to us. 
A complete line of Photographic Goods always in stock. The 
best place in Boston to have your developing and printing 
done. Send for our price list. 



Francis Bachelder. 



F. S. Snyder 



Francis Batchelder 

Beef, Pork, Mutton, Veal, Poultry, 

Game, Hams, Bacon, Lard, Butter, 

Cheese, Eggs, Cream, etc. 

Wholesale 

Provisions and Produce 



Proprietors of CAPITOL CREAMERIES, 

Central Station, Montpelier, Vt. 



Poultry and Egg House, 

Fenton, Michigan. 



Smoke Houses, Sausage Factory, Ham Cooking Fac- 
tory, Cold Storage, etc., 55, 57, 59, 61 and 63 
Blackstone Street, 

Boston, Mass. 



G. L. Lawrence. F. B. Eastman. 

J. P. LAWRENCE & CO., 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

JE*oxiltiry 9 TVTlcl Oame. 

Goods for Shipping a Specialty. 

30 FANEUIL HALL MARKET, BOSTON. 

Telephone, Haymarket 919. 



wm. 0-A.t»stiok, 

ASPEN AVENUE, AUBURNDALE, MASS. 

FLORIST. 

Bedding Plants, Cut Roses and Carnations a specialty. 



4 3 



LASELL LEAVES 



WOODLAND PARK HOTEL 

AUBURNDALE, MASS. 

Five minutes' walk from Lasell. Open all the year. 
CHAS C. BUTLER. 

HENRY W. GOODWIN, 

78-80 Broad Street, Boston, Mass. 

BRYANT & MAY'S 

LONDON PARLOUR MATCHES- 



Preferred Stoek 

MOCHA AND JAVA 

COFFEE. 

THE HIGHEST GRADE OF BLENDED COFFEE. 
ROASTED AND PACKED BY 

Martin L. Hall & Co., 

Boston, Mass. 

J, WOODWARD 

FISH, OYSTERS, EGGS, CANNED GOODS, 
VEGETABLES, ETC. 

Cor. Auburn and Ash Sts., Auburndale, Mass. 



BARLOW'S ICE CREAM. 

J. B. SANDERSON, Proprietor. 

Telephone 261-3. WEST NEWTON, MASS. 

Catering in all its branches at reasonable prices. 



BEEF, PORK, LARD, HAMS, BACON, 
PIGS' FEET and TRIPE. 



STURTEVANT & HALEY 
BEEF and SUPPLY CO, 

38 and 40 Faneuil Hall Market, 

BOSTON, MASS. 



TALLOW, STEARINE, 
FINE OLEO, OIL, SCRAP, Etc. 



CHARLES F. HATHAWAY, 

MANUFACTURING BAKER. 



Crackers, Biscuit, Bread, Cake and Pastry. Wholesale 
jobber of Kennedy's Celebrated Crackers. Hathaway's 
original Home-made Cream Bread, best in the world, 
kept by all leading grocers. 

Factories: 1906 Mass. Ave., Cambridge. 
769 Main Street, Waltliam. 



G. D. Harvey. A. C. Farley. W. T. Farley. 

Farley, Harvey &: Co. 

Importers and Jobbers of 

Dry Goods. 

141 to 149 ESSEX STREET, BOSTON. 



THIS SPACE IS PAID FOR 



BY A FRIEND. 



W. H. PRIOK. 



C. A. PRIOR 



FBI OB BROS. 

Successors to Wm. Prior, Jr., & Co. 
Wholesale and retail dealers in all kinds of 

Ocean, Lake and River Fish, Oysters and Clams 

127 and 129 Faneuil Hall Market, Hoston, Mass. 

Telephone, 673 Haymarket. 



T/~""p< sold by us is cut from Longfellow's Pond, Wellesley 
Av-'.C i Hills. Water from pond is used in Wellesley public 
service. The Newton Ice Co. is prepared to furnish a first 
class quality of I^OTTID ICE in West Newton, Newtou- 
ville, Auburndale, Newton Lower Falls and Wellesley Hills. 

MILLER & HATCH, Props. 

P. O. Address, Newton Lower Falls. 



A Hardware Store for a hundred years. 

Bnrditt & Williams 

Dealers in 

Builders' and General Hardware 
Supplies, Tools and Cutlery. 

20 DOCK SQ., BOSTON. 



LASELL LEAVES 



49 



^ COLLEGE 
GIRL 

Will always find at our store the LATEST 

CONCEITS IN STATIONERY as well as the other 

necessaries for her college work. 

Economical prices prevail. 



THORP & MARTIN CO. 

FINE STATIONERY SHOP. 

12 MILK STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 

Shreve, Cramp & Low Co. 

147 Tremont St., Boston. 

JEWELERS and SILVERSMITHS. 



STATIONERY, CLASS and SOCIETY PINS. 

Designs submitted and estimates furnished. 



The KNICKERBOCKER SHOE 

FOR COLLEGE GIRLS. 
E. IfiL. BURT St CO. 

Manufacturers. 



Automobile Red. 

Enamel. 

Box Calf. 



$3.50 



French Pat. Calf. 
Wax Calf. 
Russet Calf. 



Wide Extension Edges. Heavy or Light Soles. 

Fancy Wing Tips 50c. extra. 
Extension Heels for Golf. All the latest N. Y. Styles 

BOSTON STORE, 40 WEST STREET. 



SEND TO 

SCHIRMER S MUSIC STORE, 

(The Boston Music Company.) 



26 WEST ST., 



FOR 



BOSTON, MASS. 



Sheet Music, Music Books, Strings, etc. 

Prompt and efficient service as well as advantageous 
price guaranteed. The Singer's Guide, the Piano 
Teachers' Guide, and Choir Master's Guide sent gratis 
to any address. 



Cobb, Aldricb & Co. 



Corner of Washington and Kneeland Streets, Boston* 



ALWAYS have in stock 

THE NICEST assortment of 



CRYSTALLIZED VIOLETS. 
All kinds of French Fruits, Glaces, 
Stuffed Prunes, Salted Almonds, 
Pecans and Peanuts, Violet Sachet, 
Bonbonnierres, French Bonbons, Fancy 
Chocolates, Nougatines, Marshmallow, 
Opera Caramels, etc. 



CONFECTIONS 

OF THEIR OWN MANUFACTURE 

TO BE FOUND ANYWHERE 



FANCY CRACKERS 

OF EVERr 
DESCRIPTION. 



Also a full line of Stuffed Olives, Pim-Olas, Fancy Pickles, 
Preserves and Condiments especially adapted to Dinner and Evening Parties 



CATALOGUE FORWARDED UPON APPLICATION. 



5o 



LASELL LEAVES 



THE DAYLIGHT STORE 



provides every convenience for satis- 
factory shopping — parlor for reading, 
writing and resting — postoffice — tele- 
graph office — safety elevators running 
to basement and upper floors — every corner thoroughly lighted and ventilated. While our effort is to bring 
an increasing number of customers each day to the various departments, yet our desire is to hav6 evbby 
purchase and thb detail op every transaction so conducted by our employees that a peeling o» 
entire satisfaction will accompany each sale. Ladies' Outer Garments, Corsets, Underwear and 
Shoes are prominent everyday features of our store. 



GILCHRIST & CO. 

'WINTER and WASHINGTON STREETS. 



THE NEW SCALE 

HALLETT & DAVIS 
PIANOS. 

The recognized standard of the musical world. We 
have no hesitancy in saying that our Piauo as made 
today is as near a perfect instrument as is possible to 
manufacture. You should try and hear the New Scale 
Hallett & Davis if you are interested in a beautiful 
toned piano. We can surprise you in price, quality 
and tone. 

Established 60 Years. 179 TREMONT STREET. 



O. W. Davidson, Pres. 
Newtonville. 



F. F. Davidson, Treas. 
Auburndale. 



THOMAS IMG COMPANY, 

77 Summer St., Boston. 

GOLDSMITHS AND SILVERSMITHS. 

Special designs always in stock. 

Newest ideas in Jewelry, Sterling Silver, Cut Glass, 
Umbrellas and Pocket-books. 
Repairing a specialty. 
Makers of Class and Society Pins and Golf Prizes. 

Dr. W. F. HALL, 
Dentist. 

211 Central Street, Near Station, Auburndale. 

HOURS FROM 8 a. m. till 5 p. m. 

Refers by permission to many patients in this city. 

All Fillings warranted. Only the best of materials used. 

Special altention given to Crown and Bridge Work. 

H. B. Thayer 

NEWEST FASHIONS IN SHOES. 

Special discount to students. 
144 TREMONT STREET, BOSTON. 



o 



¥ 



DD things. 



Brooches, 
Hat Pins, 
Buckles, 
Posters, 
Steins, 
Flags. 

387 "Washington St., -0-c rUHr* £- T2T TCLT 
Boston, Mass. rSHJN 1 & DUorl. 



Tall, 1900. 



We take pleasure in announcing 



the completion by our "Jour" Tailors 



of the latest novelties in 



£adies' Suits and £adies' Gloats 



which are now displayed in the beautiful 



£adies' Suit I^com, 



adjoining our Ladies' Garment Annex. 



s£{. SKuman if do. 



Shumen Corner. Boston. 



Pascll Leaves 



tt 



DUX FEninA FACTI." 



vol. xxvi 



Lasell Seminary, Auburndale, Mass., December, 1900. Number 3 



Published monthly during the School year by the Lasell Publishing Association. 



ANNA M. PINKHAM, '02. 

Local Editor. 
RUTH M. TALCOTT. 



Editor-in-chief. 
GEORGIE M. DUNCAN, '02. 

Associate Editors. 
BESSIE Y. FULLER, '02. 

Subscription Agent. 
ETHEL M. GALLAGHER, 'oi. 



IDA M. MALLORY, '03 



Exchange Editor. 
MABEL MARTIN, *oi. 



Business Manager. 
ETHLYN F. BARBER, '01. 



Asst. Business Manager. 
JOANNA F. DEERING, '02. 



TERMS, in Advance: One copy, one year (including Postage), $1.00. Single copies, 15 cents. 



ADVERTISING RATES. 



SPACE. 


3 months 


6 months 


9 months 


SPACE. 


3 months 


6 months 


9 months 


1-8 Column 

1-6 .... 
1-4 .... 


$2.00 
3.00 
4.00 


$3.75 
5.00 
6.50 


$5.00 
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J-2 Column, .... 
3-4 " .... 
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$6.50 

9.00 

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$11.00 
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$15.00 
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The Editors will be glad to receive from the students and Alumna any communications and items of 
interest to the school. 

Editorials. 



WE are now entering upon a course of 
lectures in Business Law for Wo- 
men, which we feel will be of great bene- 
fit. Last year certain of the girls did not 
take so kindly to these lectures as might 
have been expected, seeing that they are very 
evidently intended to be of the utmost prac- 
tical advantage to us, and consequently 
these misguided ones did not get so much 
help from them as they might have gotten, 
as was clearly shown in the results of the 
examinations, which, we must say, with 
shamefacedness, were not in every case a 
great success. The girls who did pass 
last year have been excused from taking the 



course this year, but have been kindly in- 
vited to attend when they can. This some 
of them intend to do, as this year we have a 
different lecturer, and may, therefore, ex- 
pect to have the subject presented from a 
somewhat different point of view, perhaps, 
or to have additional matter of an interest- 
ing kind brought in. Some will say, "What 
is the advantage of law to women?" We 
answer, "Law is relatively as important to 
women as to men." No girl can tell what 
she is to be in the future; she cannot look 
ahead and plan for herself; but she must 
take things as they come. I do not mean 
by this that she must give up trying, for 



52 



LASELL LEAVES 



that is the worst thing a girl can do. She 
must strive to do her best, and if reverses 
come, try to overcome them and start 
afresh. No matter what her station in life, 
a good understanding of the principles of 
law is likely at some time to be of great 
service to any woman. One who has 
charge of a home would indeed find herself 
lacking without it; one who is interested in 
public affairs must have it, in order intelli- 
gently to understand them. Any woman 
is likely, at one time or another, to have 
charge of her own business affairs, and to 
manage them well is difficult to do success- 
fully without knowing, at least, the founda- 
tions of law. Every wise girl, then, will 
do her best to get all the information pos- 
sible from these lectures. If she does not 
want it now, she will, perhaps, be very glad 
to have it in the future. 



Gradually, however, custom has depart- 
ed from these ideas, and the chief 
purpose of the day, that of earnest and 
heartfelt thanks for God's fostering 
care, has become obscured by the delight of 
the people in mere feasting and making 
merry on this holiday. At the present time 
it would seem that most of us do not con- 
sider very seriously how many things we 
have to be thankful for, but think only of the 
social and convivial pleasures the day brings 
us, regarding it purely and simply as a holi- 
day, a day of fun and feasting. I fear our 
forefathers, if they should come among us 
at the present time, would be greatly shock- 
ed to see how far we have departed from 
their old established customs. 



JUST at this time our thoughts turn to 
Thanksgiving, which, perhaps, we 
might say is a forerunner of Christmas. 
We think of the pleasures it brings us in be- 
ing reunited with our dear ones once more, 
but do we really think of its true signifi- 
cance? We might consider the Thanks- 
giving of the past and that of the present, 
and notice the difference between them. A 
little over two centuries ago the Pilgrims, 
after suffering severest trials and sorrows, 
after enduring the discomforts of a scarcity 
of food that at times almost amounted to 
actual want, were at last rejoiced by bounti- 
ful harvests, and in sincere gratitude, there- 
fore, set apart one day in the fall of the 
year, in which to give thanks to God for his 
gracious answer to their prayers; and on 
this day they not only worshiped the Great 
Giver, but spread a bountiful feast by way 
of celebrating his goodness to them. For 
some time this day was observed strictly in 
accordance with the ideas of its founders. 



A MISSPELLED TAIL. 
A little buoy said: "Mother, deer, 

May Eye go out to play? 
The son is bright, the heir is clear, 

Owe ! mother, don't say neigh ! 

"Go fourth, my sun," the mother said; 

His ant said : "Take ewer slay, 
Your gniess new sled, awl painted read, 

Butt dew not lose ewer weigh." 

"Ah, know !" he cried, and sought the street 

With hart sew full of glee — 
The weather changed and snow and sleet 

And reign fell fierce and free. 

Threw snow-drifts grate, threw watry pool, 

He flue with mite and mane — 
Said he : "Though I wood walk by rule, 

Eye am knot write, 'tis plane. 

"Ide like to meat some kindly sole, 

For hear gnu dangers weight, 
And yonder stairs a treacherous whole; 

To sloe has bin my gate. 

"A peace of bred, a gniess hot stake, 

Eyed chews if Eye were home ; 
This cruel fate my hart will brake, 

I love not thus too Rome. 

"I'm weak and pail; I've mist my rode!" 

Butt hear a carte came passed — 

He and his sled were safely toad 

Back to his home at last. 

— Exchange. 



LASELL LEAVES 



S3 



The Servant Girl Problem. 



IN this discussion of the servant girl prob- 
lem, which is one of vital importance to 
the housewife, I shall confine myself to the 
consideration of a modest, rather than an 
elaborate establishment. In homes where 
there is a large retinue of servants, the mis- 
tress of the house does not, as a general rule, 
find time to trouble herself much with affairs 
of the kitchen, and as the mistress is to play 
no unimportant part in this paper, let us 
think in our application of the various points 
made, of the usual house in which are em- 
ployed but two maids, the house where the 
mistress personally superintends affairs. 

The difficulty of finding good servants, 
and of keeping them when found, has caused 
a great deal of discussion to be brought to 
bear upon the subject within the last few 
years, and finally there seems to have been 
found a solution, probably the only one pos- 
sible. 

Of course the great trouble with the aver- 
age servant girl is incompetency; but does 
this arise from unwillingness to perform the 
necessary duties of her position aright, or 
rather from utter ignorance of how they 
should be done? In most instances it will 
be found that the latter is the case, in pait, 
certainly, if not wholly; and when we con- 
sider the homes from which the majority of 
our servants come, it is not surprising. To 
begin with, a great many of the servant girls 
employed in our large cities and towns are 
foreigners, and come from countries where 
not only are the customs of housekeeping 
different from ours, but the very food sub- 
stances themselves differ often from those 
which we expect them to cook and jerve for 
us, and in such ways as shall accord with our 
tastes, fixed by long habits, and totally un- 
like theirs. Is it any wonder that they fail ? 
Who of us, placed in similar circumstances, 



could do better? Besides these, there are 
also to be considered those native-born girls 
who have come from homes where they have 
been used to only the bare necessities of life 
and have had no chance to learn how things 
may best and most advantageously be done, 
having had no other training than that af- 
forded by their own homes. Surely it is 
foolish of us to expect such to prove them- 
selves capable servants during their first ex- 
perience in household service under such 
widely differing circumstances. 

The mistress in many cases cannot hold 
herself blameless if she find difficulty in 
keeping servants. There are certain things 
she may properly demand of them, but they 
likewise have a right to expect certain things 
of her. Honesty, neatness, and good com- 
mon sense are indispensable requisites in ev- 
ery servant girl, and with these as a founda- 
tion, there is no reason why, with time, any 
girl of average ability should not develop 
into a capable and trustworthy maid. On 
the other hand, the mistress should not com- 
plain if the maid asks certain privileges, such 
as a weekly "afternoon out," and her Sunday 
evenings free. A little leniency in unimpor- 
tant matters, while making small difference 
to the mistress, serves to keep the servant 
much more contented and happy. 

In many other ways, often lamentably ig- 
nored by the employers, could a servant's life 
be made pleasanter, nay, even positively at- 
tractive. For example, if she has had suffi- 
cient education to make reading a pleasure 
to her, why should not her mistress allow 
her to read the books in the home library? 
Certainly, unless the maid should neglect her 
work for this, it would prove of very great 
benefit to her, and if the mistress took a little 
pains personally to find out her tastes, and 
to help her in selection, it would lead to the 
establishing of a very desirable mutual un- 
derstanding and basis of friendship between 



54 



LASELL LEAVES 



the two, by which state of things the mistress 
would profit no less surely than the recipient 
of these small favors. Of course this is 
possible only in the case of a girl who has 

proved herself worthy of such privileges and 
advantages. It is another matter with the 
insolent and careless servant we sometimes 
meet. It is hard to take any interest in 
these, except to get rid of them; and, indeed, 
there seems little else to be done with them. 

The solution of this weighty problem, to 
which I had reference in the beginning, is 
the establishment of schools for working 
girls, where every department of housework 
is thoroughly taught, and at a price within 
the reach of all. Such a school, with a com- 
petent woman at the head, cannot fail to be 
a blessing to housekeepers the world over. 
There girls may be taught, in a careful, sys- 
tematic way, the various branches of house- 
work, from that of the laundry up to that of 
lady's maid. It is one of the most note- 
worthy events of the past few years that such 
schools have begun to be established in our 
large cities, and are meeting with such suc- 
cess. Attention has been called more and 
more of late years in colleges and boarding 
schools to the study of what is called Do- 
mestic Science, and surely if that is becom- 
ing a feature in such schools, of how much 
more value it must be, if placed within the 
grasp of those who make such work a means 
of livelihood. 

I have read that there is one other plan 
which is finding favor, especially in Chicago, 
where it originated. Housekeepers there 
are threatening to discharge all regular ser- 
vants, or rather to give up the search for 
them, and employ so-called "household as- 
sistants" who will come at seven o'clock in 
the morning and remain until six in the even- 
ing. This would leave the servant enough 
free time to suit even that somewhat exact- 
ing individual; and also, it is thought, do 



away with the prejudice of native American 
women against household employment. 
While in some ways the plan seems practica- 
ble, it would necessitate too many radical 
changes in the household to make it es- 
pecially popular, at least, at first. All even- 
ing entertainments would necessarily be put 
into the hands of caterers, which would be 
undesirable, for the housekeeper of average 
means, in point of expense, if in nothing 
else. What is more, the evening dinner 
hour would have to be changed to the middle 
of the day, to the great inconvenience of the 
business man, who, lunching down town, 
naturally desires a warm dinner with some 
social family cheer on his return home at 
night. 

It would seem, then, as if the first sugges- 
tion, that of servant education, were the best 
way out of the difficulty. Since it is evident 
that something must be done, let us not 
choose that the "something" be of benefit to 
ourselves alone, but to the servant class as 
well. Education has ever proved one of the 
greatest blessings to mankind, and we who 
have known its advantages, should be the 
first to give our less fortunate sisters the 
benefit of it; and those who are not unselfish 
enough to be moved by this consideration 
alone, will hardly be indifferent to the fact 
that thus doing they will best subserve their 
own interests, and minister to their own 
home comfort. 



Experiment Hall. 

THE first attempt ever made in a school 
of high literary grade to combine act- 
ual housekeeping with daily studies was last 
year put in practice at Lasell and was a grat- 
ifying success. The entire lower floor of 
Experiment Hall (the old Annex) was de- 
voted to it, the kitchen and dining-room be- 
ing refurnished with the latest and most ap- 
proved apparatus, and sleeping-rooms as- 



LASELL LEAVES 



55 



signed to the temporary use of those of the 
class who chose to stay in the Hall over 
night; all under the care of a resident as- 
sistant in the Domestic Science Department. 

In this first attempt to teach Practical 
Housekeeping, it was clearly demonstrated 
that Domestic Science may go hand in hand 
with other branches of education. This 
practice work was supplemented by two 
courses of lectures on "Science Applied to 
Housekeeping." The course of lessons on 
Invalid Cookery was very popular. The 
work took the place of the daily prescribed 
physical exercise, and seemed a perfect anti- 
dote for nervous prostration. The regular 
line of studies was in no way interfered with. 

These classes are divided into three sorts. 
The first consists of our regular third year 
classes, the second consists of our graduates 
or former pupils by the month, and the third 
consists of graduates of other schools who 
may come by the month for this special train- 
ing. We want our former pupils to know 
that this opportunity is open to them and 
their friends by the month. We want our 
readers to take pains to tell it abroad, and to 

tell other friends that they may come, too. 
The terms are $50 per month, includ- 
ing everything. Ten per cent, discount to 
Lasell graduates or former pupils. 

m » 

BATTALTON OFFICERS. 

Adj. Lieut. — Edith A. Harris. 
Sar. Maj. — Marion Cole. 

Company A. 
Capt. — Ethel L. Gallagher. 
Lieut. — Georgie M. Duncan. 
1st Sar.— Ida M. Mallory. 
2nd Sar. — Annie Mae Pinkham. 
3rd Sar. — Emily A. Clemens. 

Company B. 
Capt. — Florence G. Plum. 
Lieut. — Harriet S. Ward. 
1st Sar. — Ellen Chase. 
2nd Sar. — Florence Brewer. 
3rd Sar. — Leila A. Walker. 

Company C. 
Capt. — Mabel Martin. 
Lieut. — Ina Scott. 
1st Sar. — Bessie S. Krag. 
2nd Sar. — Ethlyn F. Barber. 
3rd Sar.— Ruth M. Talcott. 



LORD'S PRAYER BY BOOTH. 



"I think," said James O'Neill, in his talk 
about the Booths, "the most thrilling exper- 
ience I ever passed through was in New 
York city one time, when quite by accident a 
number of foreign diplomats from Washing- 
ton, a few American statesmen, some promi- 
nent New Yorkers, and one or two of us pro- 
fessionals were gathered together in a smok- 
ing room of the Fifth Avenue Hotel, when 
somebody asked Booth, who by the merest 
chance happened to be there, if he would not 
repeat the Lord's Prayer for the assemblage. 
I was sitting not far from the tragedian when 
he fixed his eyes upon the man who made the 
request. I think that it was Lord Sackville 
West, at that time British minister to the 
United States, and I shall never forget the 
peculiarly searching expression that Booth 
shot out of his dark eyes. They seemed to 
penetrate the very soul of the man at whom 
they were directed, and then, as if satisfied, 
resumed their wonted vacuous density. 

"We were all breathless with anxiety, at 
least I was, for seldom would he ever recite 
off the stage, but at length he arose, walked 
to a little cleared space at one end of the 
room, and began a recital that even after all 
these years makes me thrill through and 
through. He said 'Our Father', and never 
before had those two words been clothed 
with the majesty and reverence with which 
his look and tone enveloped them. And then 
le carried us into celestial regions, our 
spirits seeming to leave our bodies and to 
follow his behest; he lowered us into depths 
too dark for Dante's genius to conceive or 
Dore's pen to portray; the power exerted 
over us was simply unnatural. His musical- 
ly resonant tones sounded slowly through the 
room, and as he swayed his lithe body we 
unconsciously followed his motion. It was 
something horrible, beautiful, terrible, fas- 



56 



LASELL LEAVES 



cinating — I cannot find words in the lan- 
guage to express it. There are none. 

"I would not go through the scene again 
for a thousand worlds, and yet if I had the 
opportunity I would brave any danger to 
hear it once more. Do you understand? 
Those few score words as delivered by Ed- 
win Booth were the most powerful argu- 
ment for Christianity that I ever heard, and 
could every being on the face of the globe 
have heard them there would no longer be 
atheism. Booth strode out of the room 
when he finished, and a simultaneous sigh of 
relief arose, while without a word we stole 
away singly and on tiptoe, and I do not be- 
lieve that any of us think of that thrilling 
evening without a shudder. He was a great 
man, a great man." — Kansas City Times. 

■ m 

THE BRAVEST BATTLE THAT EVER WAS 
FOUGHT. 

BY JOAQUIN MILLER. 

The bravest battle that ever was fought; 

Shall I tell you where and when? 
On the maps of the world you will find it not; 

'Twas fought by the mothers of men. 

Nay, not with cannon or battle shot, 

With sword or nobler pen ; 
Nay not with eloquent word or thought, 

From mouths of wonderful men. 

But deep in a walled-up woman's heart — 

Of woman that would not yield, 
But bravely, silently bore her part — 

Lo ! there is that battlefield. 

No marshaling troop, no bivouac song ; 

No banner to gleam and wave; 
But oh ! these battles they last so long — 

From babyhood to the grave ! 

Yet, faithful still as a bridge of stars, 
She fights in her walled-up town — 

Fights on and on in the endless wars, 
Then silent, unseen — goes down. 

O, ye with banners and battle shot, 
And soldiers to shout and praise, 

I tell you the kingliest victories fought 
Were fought in these silent ways. 

O, spotless woman in world of shame ! 

With splendid and silent scorn. 
Go back to God as white as you came, 

The kingliest warrior born. 




PERSONALS. 

— The engagement is announced of Miss 
May Louise Gurley, to Mr. Edgar Hayes 
Betts, of Lansingburgh, New York. 

— The engagement is announced of Miss 
Alice Rix Taylor, to Mr. E. Clifford Potter, 
of Newton Centre, Mass. 

— Mrs. Nellie Ailing Thayer of Newton 
Center, with Mrs. Bennett, called upon Miss 
Bennett on the 19th. She says her Mar- 
garet (eight years old) is anxiously won- 
dering when she shall pick out her room at 
Lasell, and thinks she would like the same 
one her mother had. Mrs. Nellie is Presi- 
dent of the Ladies' Aid Society, and in gen- 
eral a woman much in demand, as all La- 
sell girls are, practical, capable and useful. 
Mr. Thayer is much engaged with his sing- 
ing. His rare tenor voice and musical 
ability are in much demand. 

— Bessie Risser, mention of whose recent 
bereavement will be found in another col- 
umn, will not be able to return to us, as we 

had hoped she might. 

— Edith Gale ('89) is teaching in the Al- 
len Normal School, Thomasville, Ga. — 
music and some regular branches. The 
school is under the auspices of the American 
Miss. Association. The climate she finds 
delightful, and the work interesting. The 
place is something of a resort for northern 
people, many of whom have winter homes 
there, Mark Hanna being one. Edith is 
to spend the holidays in St. Augustine. 

— Daisy Seasongood writes that she is 



LASELL LEAVES 



57 



"attending the university, for the purpose of 
studying logic, French literature of the 19th 
century, and English literature of the 17th, 
1 8th and 19th centuries." She finds a very 
great amount of reading necessary, and this 
she is finding helpful and suggestive in many 
ways. She speaks of the recent death of a 
very dear cousin, a young man. 

— Edith Bailey (1900) writes of enjoying 
the Leaves. 

— Esther Bridgman Lane writes that 
Mary Strickland Whitney has been abroad 
for nearly three years with her sister, Fanny. 
She thinks of returning in the spring, but 
Esther thinks it unlikely, since, having lost 
her father, mother, husband, and child, she 
has nothing to call her back to America. 
Esther has three fine boys, of whom she 
writes with all a mother's pride; with these 
and her good husband, her life, she says, is 
full of peace and happiness. Her years at 
Lasell she counts among the brightest and 
most treasured of her life, and says, "The 
little lessons learned there outside books have 
been always helpful." 

■ — Nellie Carnahan is attending the Indi- 
ana State Normal School, expecting to teach 
after finishing her course there. Her ad- 
dress is 441 N. Fifth St., Terre Haute, Ind. 

— Mabel Marston has been in New York 
almost ever since her graduation, though in 
May she visited Anna Wells in Le Roy. 
She is at present at home busy with house- 
keeping duties, and with music, to which she 
gives some four hours daily. Expects soon 
to begin vocal, too, she says, despite "the 
fact that I haven't any voice." She attended 
on Good Friday last the services at the Mar- 
ble Collegiate, on 5th Ave., and found the 
music very beautiful. Among other things 
they sang Mr. Bragdon's favorite hymn, 
"We may not climb the heavenly steps." 
She may look in upon us at Lasell some time 
this winter. 



-During her recent business trip West, 



Mabel Lutes ('9 



5) 



id the pleasure of a 



charming visit with Clara Souther, whom 
she almost missed, however, since Clara was 
out of the city — Indianapolis — when Mabel 
arrived there. Coming back in time, though, 
she packed Mabel off home with her, and they 
had a fine time together. She — Clara — is 
well, and "just as nice as ever," and that's 
very nice, as we all know who knew her here. 
Mabel also saw Mrs. Carnahan, who said 
that Nellie was well and enjoying her 
studies. 

— Mabel Martin and Bess Krag can make 
good bread — Mr. Bragdon says so. He 
tried it — and so can Florence Brewer. 
Splendid ! 

— Grace Houghton is studying art at the 
Cincinnati Art Academy, her father having 
moved this fall from Columbus to Cincin- 
nati. Grace hopes to become a portrait 
painter. She has had a recent visit from 
Edith Moulton ('99). The address Grace 
gives is Elberson Avenue, Cincinnati. 

— Alice Magoun planned to attend the 
October meeting of the New England His- 
tory Teachers' Association, in Boston, and 
was expected at that time to come out to 
Lasell to see us, but was disappointed, and 
did not get to Boston at all. She speaks of 
certain history work, which she did last year 
under the direction of Dr. Hart, of Cam- 
bridge, and which she found very congenial 
and inspiring work. She saw Alice Hall 
in August, and had a delightful afternoon 
with her. Hattie Clark Van Doren wrote 
her in August of a projected trip to Europe 
with her husband and the two boys, bright, 
interesting little fellows of seven and five. 
Of her school work, English and history, 
Alice speaks with evident pleasure, and with 
no less evident appreciation of the College 
lecture courses at Amherst which she is en- 
abled to enjoy through her residence in that 



58 



LASELL LEAVES 



town, mentioning especially in this line Pro- 
fessor Genung's readings in Browning. 

— Edith Grant ('98) tells us that they 
have moved again, this time to Hotel Beres- 
ford, 8 1st St., and Central Park West, where 
they have a very comfortable place, with de- 
lightful views on both sides of them. Her 
health, she says, has put a veto upon her 
carrying out her plan of entering Barnard 
College. The election this fall put her in 
mind of that held at Lasell when she was 
here, four years ago, and the attendant ex- 
citement. Ada Cadmus ('98) and Edith 
spent some time together at St. Hubert's 
Inn, in the Adirondacks, last summer pre- 
sumably, though she doesn't say when. 

— We learn through a clipping that Hattie 
Pendexter was one of a party of girls who 
enjoyed last summer a White Mountain trip 
together. Certain others of the party were 
Lasell-girls-to-be, so it seems. Who were 
they? 

— We saw Clara Lewis recently for a too 
brief chat on the street car, coming out from 
the city one day. She looks the picture of 
health and contentment. Is with her sister 
in Brookline now. She mentioned having 
been housekeeper for awhile during her sis- 
ter's absence on a trip away, and spoke also 
of being regularly engaged to sing at one of 

the Brookline churches. 

We have had a splendid time this month 

with old girls. Carol Case and Helen 

Campbell came and stayed at Mrs. Walker's 

from Wednesday to Friday, and kindly gave 

us some of their time. I have no idea what 

they did with the rest of it. Carol said she 

had to get back so as to be at that barbarous 

Harvard- Yale football game on Saturday. 

She keeps her interest in the battalion. She 

may come next year to have charge of the 

whole drill. Helen doesn't know what she 

is doing for a living. At the same time May 

Rice, of Evanston, and Alice Maloon, of 



Beverly, came for a bit. May Rice's folks 
have started on a two years' tour of the 
known world. Alice Maloon is having fine 
success at massage. All our girls look well. 
Then Alice Taylor called. She was visiting 
her future husband's family in Newton Cen- 
tre (to see if they approved?) Then Frances 
Wood and Emily Bissell smiled upon us. 
They had a great time in Europe. 

But the bright, particular visit of the 
month was that of Mrs. Gilman (Adelaide 
L. Sears, 1857), Mrs. May, (Emma E. 
Sears, 1857), and Mrs. T. D. Chamberlain 
(Delia Jarvis, almost of 1857). This is 
Mrs. Chamberlain's first visit since 1856. 

Her late husband's brother was the gallant 
Gen'l Joshua L. Chamberlain of Maine. 

It was delightful to see their interest in 
everything new and old. They went to the 
rooms where they used to live. They told 
about pranks they used to play. They talk- 
ed about the old girls in the pictures of the 
classes of 1855, 1856, and 1857; made fun of 
themselves in old time costume, and admired 
all the improvements, and wished they were 
girls to begin again. 

Then the next day came Alice Ashley and 
Agnes Flaherty of 1900. Agnes didn't stay 
long. She is living in Cambridge, and tak- 
ing singing lessons of Miss White. Alice 
Ashley took Thanksgiving dinner with Alice 
Jenckes, who has just spent seven weeks with 
her. Then Alice J. came up here with Alice 
A. Then Beulah Smith came with the 
daughter of an old friend of Mr. B.'s. Then 
Mabel Gamwell and Bertha Metcalf looked 
ed just a bit. She was spending Sunday 
with Miss Dresser. 

The following have been favored with 
calls from members of their family : Misses 
Kneeland, Nelson, Bennett, Rogers, Mc- 
Lean, Martin, Bowers, Pendexter, Noyes, 
Woodbury, North, M. Whitney, Brewer, 
Barker, Clokey, Kimball, Bullock, McKinnie, 



LASELL LEAVES 



59 



Matthews, Lapouski, Walter, L. Whitney, 
Krag. 

Former pupils : Clara Robbins, Ella Cot- 
ton, Agnes Flaherty, Ethel Walton, Alice 
Taylor, Frances Wood, Emily Bissell, Lucy 
Curtis, Helen Campbell, Maude Case, May 
Rice, Alice Maloon, Beulah Smith, Bertha 
Metcalf, Mabel Gamwell, Bertha Warren, 
Alice Kimball, Ada Marsh. 



MARRIAGES. 

— Lillian Mason Baker to Joseph Foss 
Humphrey, on Wednesday, Nov. 7, at Den- 
ver, Colo. Home address: 1537 Vine St., 
Denver. 

— Louese Chase Horton to Edward 
Wright McKinstry, on Wednesday, Nov. 7, 
at Cleveland, Ohio. 

— Lily Flagg to the Rev. Charles Henry 
Duncan, on Monday, Nov. 12, in New York 
City. Home address, Millbrook, New York. 

— Helen Holman ('96) to Livingston 
Pearne Moore, on Wednesday, Nov. 21, in 
Chicago. Home address, after Feb. 1, 938 
Flournoy St. 

— Mary Walker to Robert Milton Leach, 
on Wednesday, Nov. 28, at Taunton, Mass. 
Home address : 57 Berkely St., Taunton. 

— Ruth Alice Cleaveland to Benjamin 
Franklin Bates, on Wednesday, Nov. 28, at 
Denver, Colo. Home address: 1225 
Twelfth Ave., Denver. 

— Myrna Lamson to Pierre Kissam Tyng, 
on Monday, Dec. 17, at Chicago. Home 
address, after Feb. 1 : 57 Johnson Park, Buf- 
falo, N. Y. 



\ 



A "WORD TO LASELL SHOPPERS. 

The importance of trading with the firms 
who advertise in the Lasell Leaves can- 
not be overestimated. We should not ex- 
pect their patronage if we do not give them 
our support in return. Another way for 
Lasell girls to be loyal ! 




November 10. — A Waltham orchestra 
played during the dinner hour, and after- 
wards in the gymnasium, much to the de- 
light of the girls, many of whom spent the 
evening in dancing. 

November 15. — About thirty girls, under 
the care of Mr. Bragdon, attended the 
Strauss concert at Symphony Hall. The 
house, although not crowded, was well filled 
to hear the court musical director of Ger- 
many, with his orchestra, and all enjoyed the 
evening very much. 

November 16. — On this evening a party 
chaperoned by Mrs. Martin, attended the 
impersonation of "The Merchant of Venice" 
by Mrs. Southwick. Between the acts were 
two harp solos. The evening was one to be 
remembered. 

On the evening of November 19, several 
of the girls went into Boston with Mr. Brag- 
don to hear Elbert Hubbard lecture on the 
"Roycrofters," at Tremont Temple. Mr. 
Hubbard looks rather peculiar with his hair 
falling to his shoulders, and his odd-looking, 



6o 



LASELL LEAVES 



rolling collar, but these little things are for- 
gotten when one hears him speak. He told 
very entertainingly of his shop at East Au- 
rora, where "books and things" are made, 
and of the workers, who have increased from 
the one or two assistants employed at first 
to two hundred and fifty, and are most of 
them people who would usually be refused 
employment elsewhere, one of the most 
trusted persons in the shop, for instance, be- 
ing a released convict. Mr. Hubbard goes 
by the nickname of "John" among his em- 
ployes, who do not stand on ceremony. A 
clue to his popularity with his men was in 
one of several things that he said by way of 
conclusion. This was that, in his opinion, 
it is a very poor way of doing business to 
strike from the payroll sick persons, or those 
who have grown old in their employer's ser- 
vice, and this opinion was heartily applauded 
by the audience. 

Mr. Hills has given to the pupils of the 
piano department this term three lectures, 
which have been very interesting and in- 
structive. In these lectures upon Technical 
Analysis, he has particularly emphasized the 
importance to the player of a correct posi- 
tion, and of those conditions which produce 
it. Two ensemble classes have already been 
formed. This department is flourishing, as 
under Mr. Hills it must always be. 

November 22. — The Rev. S. M. Crothers 
lectured upon "The Spiritual Message of 
Browning." Among other good things he 
said, "We are often told that Browning is 
obscure, but after all no poet was ever clearer 
than he in the purpose he had in view. He 
leads us to something higher and better in 
religion, and shows us divine love in man 
and nature." Mr. Crothers, who is a prom- 
inent minister in Cambridge, is also a well- 
known writer of very interesting magazine 
articles on sundry literary subjects. 

November 24. — Surely the gymnasium 



never looked prettier than on this evening, 
when arranged to represent a large drawing- 
room, in which the Juniors received and en- 
tertained the Seniors. "A Salamagundi 
Party" was the entertainment of the evening, 
and after play was over, and while the re- 
freshments were being served, the prizes 
were announced and presented to the win- 
ners. The first prize, a handsome belt 
buckle, was won by Miss Gamwell; the sec- 
ond, a picture of the Countess Potocka, by 
Miss Lum, while to Miss Isabella Clemens 
was awarded the booby prize, a small drum 
with the words "Here's something you can 
beat" upon it. All had a good time, and 
the guests of the evening heartily expressed 
their pleasure to the Juniors. 

November 25. — As the weather was quite 
unpleasant, and all were excused from going 
to church, more time than would otherwise 
have been possible was allowed to listen to 
the very interesting talk in the chapel about 
the work at the North End Mission in Bos- 
ton, by Miss Cooke, founder of this mission, 
and one of its most faithful and enthusiastic 
workers. She spoke particularly of the 
medical work there, and of the many to 
whom it has brought, and is still bringing, 
help and relief from physical ills. Its effi- 
ciency and usefulness is greatly hindered 
through lack of room, but there is prospect 
now of having presently a new and more 
spacious building for this purpose, which we 
hope will greatly advance this good work. 

In the evening Mr. Bragdon took a party 
to the People's Temple in Boston to hear 
Mr. Warren W. Adams, with a chorus of 
fifty trained singers, assisted by several well 
known soloists, present Rossini's "Stabat 
Mater." The music, being finely rendered, 
was greatly enjoyed. 

November 29. — Thanksgiving was thor- 
oughly enjoyed by all who remained here. 
A very creditable number went to the morn- 



LASELL LEAVES 



61 



ing service with Mr. Bragdon, while others 
went for a brisk walk in the keen air; and 
both church-goers and pedestrians seemed to 
have gained appetites sharp enough to enable 
them to do full justice to the generous dinner 
that came later. At 1.30 a throng of merry 
faces gathered round the prettily arrayed 
tables. The place of each was designated 
by a card bearing the name of the guest, ac- 
companied by a menu card and an orchestra 
program. Dr. Watkins gave thanks, and 
the guests were seated. During the feast- 
ing the orchestra rendered many familiar 
and attractive selections, while all enjoyed 
talking together and listening to amusing 
stories, jokes, and the like. After dinner 
the party adjourned to the gymnasium, 
where social fun and frolic continued. In 
the evening a large number of the girls went 
to see Willard, in "The Professor's Love 
Story." Everyone reported a happy 
Thanksgiving. 

December 1. — Dr. Winslow having fin- 
ished his course of lectures upon "Household 
Economy," Dr. Mary Greene gave the first 
of her lectures upon "Business Law for Wo- 
men," on Saturday afternoon. Although 
those who passed in this course last year are 
not required to attend, yet several of them 
do, wisely realizing that this is a subject 
about which one cannot know too much. 

JEFFERSON'S TEN RULES. 
Rules that governed Thomas Jefferson's daily life : 

1. Never put off till tomorrow what you can do 
today. 

2. Never trouble another for what you can do 
yourself. 

3. Never spend your money before you have it. 

4. Never buy what you do not want because it is 
cheap ; it will be dear to you. 

5. Pride costs us more than hunger, thirst and 
cold. 

6. We never repent of having eaten too little. 

7. Nothing is troublesome that we do willingly. 

8. How much pain have cost us the evils which 
never happened. 

9. Take things always by the smooth handle. 

10. When angry, count ten before you speak ; when 
very angry, a hundred. 



PASSED AWAY. 

— The earth is resting, yet she is not idle, 
though she seem so; she is gathering 
strength for days yet to come; preparing 
robes of beauty to wear under blue skies in 
brighter sunshine; quietly, and in manifold 
unnoticed and unknown ways, getting her- 
self ready for a richness and fulness of re- 
newed life that shall wave myriads of green 
banners in the air, and fill it with the frag- 
rance and beauty of countless delicate blos- 
soms. And we say of her, "She is dead! 
Rigid she lies, shrouded in snow, her poor 
old face wrinkled and drawn — no beauty 
left, no life — dead." But because we choose 
thus to dwell upon the picture of death, is 
she, then, "dead" ? Wait till May, till June, 
then answer, when apple boughs are abloom 
from tip to tip, the air instinct with the very 
essence of life, the grass greenly springing, 
and the tidal-wave of beauty overflowing the 
world. Is it not thus with our beloved 
dead? Only resting awhile, to rejoice our 
longing eyes later with a finer, an immortal 
loveliness; with a fresher, an undying love 
to repay our long and lonely days of waiting. 
Ah, the resurrection spring! what shall it 
show to us in those whom with tear-blinded 
eyes we call "dead," and think of as lost? 
Wait till the Master shall say to us, as Philip 
to Nathaniel, "Come and see." 

— Again to Bessie Risser's home has come 
the sorrow of parting, in the loss of her loved 
sister, Mary Lois, a young girl of nineteen, 
with whom Bessie was last year at Asheville, 
N. C. Readers of the Leaves will remem- 
ber the sad blow sustained last April by the 
family in the death of Albert, a 15-year-old 
brother of Bessie's, and but a short time ago 
a young cousin was taken away, after a lin- 
gering illness. In all these troubles, and es- 
pecially in this last bitter grief, she and her 
suffering family have our heartfelt sympa- 
thy. 



62 



LASELL LEAVES 



— Daisy Seasongood and her family 
mourn the loss of a dear cousin of hers, a 
young man of twenty-seven. With these, 

too, we sympathize in their sorrow. 

«. — «, 

The Lion ramps around the cage, 

The Lady smiles to see him rage. 

The little Mouse outside the bars 

Looks on and laughs. "Well bless my stars !" 

Quoth he, "to think they call that thing 

The King of Beasts ! If he's a King, 

Who cannot make the Lady wince, 

What must I be? When, not long since, 

Inside the cage I chanced to slip, 

You should have seen that Lady skip 

Upon the Lion's back. 'Help ! Murder ! 

A Mouse !' she screamed ; you should have heard 

her! 
And then with brooms the keepers came 
And drove me out (but, all the same, 
I got the crumb that I was after). 
A King, indeed ! Excuse my laughter !" 

— Oliver Her ford. 

If you have built castles in the air, your 
work need not be lost; that is where they 
should be built; now put the foundations 
under them. — Thoreau. 



^ 



Foot Anatomy. 

Is a branch of science that the skilled shoe 
maker lias to thoroughly master. The 
makers of 




have, after years of experience, acquired a 
knowledge enabling them to produce shoes 
that have a snug, glove-like fit at the heel, 
ankle and instep, seldom found eve.n in the 
finest custom-made shoes, and they reveal a 
style and individuality of their own which all 
good dressers appreciate. 

(Forty styles in all Leathers.) 



Alnan 



S3.5Q 



Pair. 



Shepard, Noriell & Co., 

Winter Street, Boston. 



Business Established 1817. 



JOHN H. PRAY & 




GO. 



Wholesale and retail dealers in 



CARPETS ^kto RTJQS 



of both Foreign and Domestic Manufacture; also 



Curtains, Draperies, Portieres 



and all 

descriptions 

of choice 



Upholstery Fabrics, 



^-PRICES ALWAYS MODERATE.^ 



CTOHIIsr IHL n^^lrT & soisrs CO, 

Oldeat and Largest Carpet Home in Jfew England. 
PRAY BUILDING, Opposite Boylston St. 

6 5 8 WASHINGTON STREET, BOSTON. 6 5 8 



LASELL LEAVES 



63 




— At the University of Pennsylvania a 
war memorial tower has recently been erect- 
ed in memory of those who fell in the late 
war with Spain. — Ex. 

— There are four Filipinos registered at 
the University of Minnesota, and six at Cal- 
ifornia. — Ex. 

— Exchanges received this month are: 
Classic, The Tiltonian, The Kalends, 
Chauncy Hall, The Pennsylvanian, Col- 
lege Rambler, Ryan Classic, The Olym- 
pian, The Argosy, The Harvard Lampoon, 
The Porcupine, The Radiator, and The 
Question Mark. 



SUBSCRIBE NOW. 

Now is the time to send in your sub- 
scription to the Leaves, girls. You all enjoy 
the items about the girls you knew here, and 
should not deprive yourself of this bond of 
union with your old friends and your school 
home. If you have any news of yourself, or 
of any of the girls, let us have it for our 
"Personals." We thank those who have 
already done this. 

vi^rt ^Needlework, Sofa "Pillows, 

Banners, etc. 

175 TREMONT ST. (Near Tremont Theatre.) 

BONBON5 

CHOCOLATE? 

Delicious Ice Cre&rr? Soda. 

145 TREMONT STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 




THE BEST IS NONE TOO GOOD 
FOR A LASELL GIRL. 




WE bave been chosen to make, for MEMBERS OP THE CLASS OF 1901, the BEST 
and MOST ARTISTIC PHOTOGRAPHS they have ever had. 

Members of other classes will be given a VERY LOW SCHOOL BATE upon our 
HIGH ART PRODUCTIONS. 

21 WEST STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 



6 4 



LASELL LEAVES 



FREEMAN & FLETCHER, 
THE FLORISTS. 

12 CHARLES STREET, AUBUBNDALE. 

Nearest Greenhouses to Lasell. 

Long Distance Telephone. 

Mrs. C. H. HALL, 

DRESSMAKER. 

Work done at reasonable prices. 

Special rates to stndents. 

490 AUBURN STREET, AUBURNDALE. 



SHOES FOR 
YOUNG LADIES. 

Neivest Shapes. Newest Styles for Gym- 
nasium, Tennis, Walking and Dress. 

WIS GIVE TEN PER CENT. DISCOUNT 
TO AJLL IASEII, STUDENTS. 

THE HENRY H. 
TUTTLE CO., 

Cor. WASHINGTON and WINTER STS., 
BOSTON. 



SPRIfiGEH B^OS. CO. 
CliOflK, SUIT and pUH HOUSE 

155 TREMONT STREET, NEAR WEST STREET. 

Ladies' Coats, Capes, Suits, Furs, Golf Capes, Golf Skirts, Walking 

Skirts, Waists, Traveling Rugs, etc. 

Superior Grade Furs a Specialty. Discount to Students. 

NEW CUSTOM DEPARTMENT. FINEST IN THE CITY. SKILLED MANAGEMENT. 
COURTEOUS ATTENTION. PROMPT EXECUTION OF ORDERS. 



OPTICIANS. 

A/rANUFACTURERS of Spectacles and Eye Glasses, and Im- 
"*■ porters of Opei a, Field and Marine Glasses and Optical 
Goods of every description. Oculists' prescription work a 
specialty. 

165 Tremont Street, Boston. 

FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

OF WEST NEWTON, MASS. 

James H. Nickerson. Pres. A. R. Mitchell, Vice-Pres. 

Edward P. Hatch, Cashier. 

General Banking, Collection and Exchange. 
Capital, $100,000. 

Business hours dailv, 8.30 to 12 a m. and 1 to 3 p.m. 
Saturdays. 8.30 a. m. to 12 m. Sate deposit boxes to rent in 
new fiie and burglar proof vault. 

ELLIOT W. KEYES 



TAYLOR BLOCK, 



AUBURNDALE. 



Apothecary. 



Drugs, Medicines and Toilet Articles. 
California Perfumes. Confections. 



Rockwell and Churchill. 



PRINTERS 

THIRTY-NINE ARCH STREET, 

BOSTON, MASS. 



SCHOOL ANNUALS, 
ANNOUNCEMENTS, 
CATALOGUES. 



PRINTERS OF LASELL CATALOGUE. 



C. RAYMOND di LUC CI, 

CHOICE FRUITS, CANDY, NUTS, ETC. 

C GARS and TOBACCO. 

365 AUBURN STREET, corner ASH STREE1 

AUBURNDALE, MASS. 

b. is. oox„i±: 



MUTTON, LAMB, VEAL, 

POULTRY and GAME 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL. 

Stalls 13 and 15, Faneuil Hall Market, Boston. 

Telephone connection. 

George W. Kimball & Co., 

Wholesale and retail dealers in 

Poultry, Game, Beef, Mutton, Lamb and Yeal. 

Basement, No. 32a North Street, opposite Merchants' 
Row, Boston. 

Telephone 927 HaymarUet. 



Howard M. Smith. 



Albert P. Smith. 



SMITH BROTHERS. 

(Successors to Geo. H. Pbil brook & Co.) 

Butter, Cheese, Earsrs 

Stalls No. 2 and 4, 

Faneuil Hall Market, Boston, Mass. 

Telephone, Hay market 884. 



LASELL LEAVES 



65 




Ladies' Shirt and Golf Waists, 
$5.00 to $20.00. 

From Madras, Oxfords, Cheviot, French 
Percales, English and French Flannels, 
Silk and Moire Poplin. 



Blanket Wraps 

For the Nursery. 
For the Sick Room. 
For the Bath. 

For Steamer Traveling. 
For the Railway Carriage. 
For Yachting. 
For Men, Women, Children and the 
Baby, §2.75 to $35, with Hood and 
Girdle complete. 



A Special Department for 

Ladies' Golf "Waists, 
Bicycle and Golf Skirts, 
Entire Golfing Suits. 

GOLF CLUBS, 
GOLF BALLS and 
CADDY BAGS. 




NOYES BROS. 

"Washington and Summer Streets, 

BOSTON, Mass., U. S. A. 



FURS. 



FURS. 



COLLARETTES, 
STORM COLLARS, 

SCARFS and MIFFS. 



SPECIAL DISCOUNT TO LASELL 
STUDENTS. 



Edw. Kakas & Sons 

162 Tremont St. 



DAVIS, CIIAPIN CO. 

J. A. BARKER, President. 

Commission Merchants and Wholesale 
Dealers in Foreign and Domestic 

Fruits and Produce. 

83 and 85 Paneuil Hall Mark t, 

Cellar 15 Scm'b Side, 

Boston, Mas. 

Telephone Haymarket 777. 



MILLS & DEERING, 

Receivers and Dealers in Fine Grades of 

BUTTER 

AND STRICTLY FRESH EGGS. 

CHAS. W. HICCINS, 

Choice Family Groceries. 

Teas, Coffees, Spices, Canned Goods, Fancy 
Crackers, Fruit, Nuts and Confections. 

Davis Block, 417 Auburn St., Auburudale- 



66 



LASELL LEAVES 



JOSHUA THORNDIKE. 



CHAS. W. SPEAR 



JOSHUA THORNDIKE & CO. 



DEALERS IN 



MUTTON, LAMB and VEAL 

Stalls 3 and 5 New Faneuil Hall Market, 
BOSTON, MASS. 

Edward E. Babb & Co. 

25 Arch St., Boston, Mass. 

Dealers in 

SCHOOL BOOKS and SCHOOL SUPPLIES 

D. A. HOWE 

273 MAIN STREET, WORCESTER, MASS. 

WHOLESALE GROCER. 

Gallons Canned Goods of all kinds and of the best 
quality a specialty. Teas and Coffees. 



Dr. GEORGE A. BATES, 

TAYLOR BLOCK, AUBURNDALE. 

DENTIST. 

Office hours. — Mondays, Wednesdays, Thursdays 
and Saturdays, 8 a. m. to 4 p. m. 



If YOU Wish to Buy Send to us for prices or 

other information. We 
carry the largest stock of 
any t<toi e in New England, 
and can furnish any books 
in print at the shortest 
notice. We can save you 

money. Catalogue of special bargains mailed free. 



m 



De Wolfe, Fiske & Co. 

361 and 365 Washington St., Boston, Mass. 

fcttoSSr%&i. 

_ * BOSTONMass^Me^// ( 

latMer 1 ^ 



EtVHissWft 



»J822ji 



TR^Ot MARK 



FINEST ROAD-BED ON THE CONTINENT. 



Boston and Albany Railroad. 



THROUGH CAR SERVICE IN EFFECT SEPTEMBER 20, 1900. 



No. 7 — Leaves Boston at 8.30 a. m. except Sunday. Wagner buffet drawing-room car, Boston to Albany. 
No. 15 — Leaves Boston at 10.45 a. m. daily. Wagner vestibuled buffet library-smoking car and vestibuled 

sleeping cars. Boston to Chicago, via L. S. & M. S. R. R. to St. Louis via Big Four 

Route. Dining car service. 
No. 19 — Leaves Boston at 2.00 p. m. daily. The North Shore Special Wagner buffet vestibuled sleeping 

cars, Boston to Cleveland and Chicago. I 

No. 23 — Leaves Boston at 3.30 p. m. except Sunday. Wagner buffet vestibuled 'sleeping cars, Boston to 

Niagara Falls. Tourist sleeping car Boston to Chicago. 
No. 37 — Leaves Boston at 6.00 p. m. daily. Wagner vestibuled sleeping car, Boston to Cleveland and 

Cincinnati via L. S. & M. S. R. R. ; also Wagner vestibuled 'sleeping car, Boston to Detroit 

and Chicago via M. C. R. R. 
No. 63 — Leaves Boston at 11.00 p. m., except Saturday. Wagner sleeping car, Boston to Albany, arriv- 
ing at 7.57 a. m. 
For information, maps, time-tables, tickets and accommodations in drawing-room and sleeping cars, 
apply to agents of Boston & Albany Railroad at its several stations. 

J. L. WHITE, City Pass, and Ticket Agent, or to A. S. HANSON, Gen. Pass. Agent. 

The only first-class through line from New England to the West. 



City Ticket Office, 366 Washington St., Boston 



LASELL LEAVES 



67 




COTRELL S LEONARD, 

ALBANY, N. Y. 

MAKERS OF 

CAPS, GOWNS and HOODS 

to the American Universities and to 
Lasell Seminary. Illustrated Man- 
ual, Samples, etc., upon application. 



PLEASE FORWARD GOODS BY 

JOHNSON & KEYES EXPRESS CO. 

AUBURNDALE AND BOSTON EXPRESS. 

Offices: 34 Court Sq., 77 Kingston, 105 Arch Streets 
BOSTON. 



WAUWINET FARM. 

COMMONWEALTH AVE. AND VALENTINE ST., 

WEST NEWTON, MASS. 
All interested in a modern Dairy are invited to visit the Farm. 



"V. A. 



DEALER IN 



FPio^risioisrs- 

Corner Auburn and Lexington Streets, 

.Auburndale, Mass. 



Established 1830 

Alfred Mudge & Son 
PRINTERS 

24 Franklin Street, Boston 

CLASS PRINTING 
A SPECIALTY 



A.ndrew J. Lloyd <fc Co. 

o:ptici^ns 

BOWN-TOWN-323 Washington St., opp. Old South Church. 

BACK BAY— 310 Bo}lston St., opp. Arlington St. 

Bring your prescriptions for Eyeglasses and Spectacles to us. 
A complete line of Photographic Goods always in stock. The 
hest place in Boston to have your developing and printing 
done. Send for our price list. 



Fbancts Bacheldee. 



F. S. Sntder 



Francis Batchelder 




Beef, Pork, Mutton, Veal, Poultry, 

Game, Hams, Bacon, Lard, Butter, 

Cheese, Eggs, Cream, etc. 



Provisions and Produce 



Proprietors of CAPITOL CREAMERIES, 

Central Station, frlontpelier, Vt. 



Poultry and Egg House, 

Fenton, Michigan. 



Smoke Houses, Sausage Factory, Ham Cooking Fac- 
tory, Uold Storage, etc., 55, 57, 59, 61 and 63 
Blackstone Street, 

Boston, Mass. 



G. L. Laweence. F. B. Eastmas. 

J. P. LAWRENCE & CO., 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

JPoultry, TV^ild. Game. 

Goods for Shipping a Specialty. 

30 FANEUIL HALL MARKET, BOSTON. 

Telephone, Haymarket 919. 

ASPEN AVENUE, AUBURNDALE, MASS. 

FLORIST. 

Bedding Plants, Cut Rosea and Carnations a specialty. 



68 



LASELL LEAVES 



WOODLAND PARK HOTEL 

AUBURNDALE, MASS. 

Five minutes' walk from Lasell. Open all the year. 
CHAS C. BUTLER. 

HENRY W. GOODWIN, 

78-80 Broad Street, Boston, Mass. 

BRYANT & MAY'S 

LONDON PARLOUR MATCHES- 



Preferred Stock 

MOCHA AND JAVA 

COFFEE. 

THE HIGHEST GRADE OF BLENDED COFFEE. 

ROASTED AND PACKED BY 

Martin L. Hall & Co., 

Boston, Mass. 

J, WOODWARD 

FISH, OYSTERS, EGGS, CANNED GOODS, 
VEGETABLES, ETC. 

Co?. Auburn and Ash Sts., Auburndale, Mass. 



BARLOW'S ICE CREAM. 

J. B. SANDERSON, Proprietor. 

Telephone 261-3. WEST NEWTON, MASS. 

Catering in all its branches at reasonable prices. 



BEEP, PORK, LARD, HAMS, BACON, 
PIGS' FEET and TRIPE. 



STURTEVANT & HALEY 
BEEF and SUPPLY CO. 

38 and 40 Faneuil Hall Market, 
BOSTON, MASS. 

TALLOW, STEARINE, 
FINE OLEO, OIL, SCRAP, Etc. 



CHARLES F. HATHAWAY, 

MANUFACTURING BAKER. 

Crackers, Biscuit, Bread, Cake and Pastry. Wholesale 
jobber of Kennedy's Celebrated Crackers. Hathaway's 
original Home-made Cream Bread, best in the world, 
kept by all leading grocers. 

Factories: 1906 Mass. Ave., Cambridge. 
769 Main Street, Waltham. 



G. D. Harvey. A. C. Farley. W. T. Farley. 

Farley, Harvey Ac Co. 

Importers and Jobbers of 

Dry Goods. 

141 to 149 ESSEX STREET, BOSTON. 



THIS SPACE IS PAID FOR 



BY A FRIEND. 



W. H. PRIOR. c. A. PRIOR 

PRIOR BROS. 

Successors to ffm. Prior, Jr., & Co. 
Wholesale and retail dealers in all kinds of 

Ocean, Lake and River Fish, Oysters and Clams 

127 and 129 Faneuil Sail Market, Boston, Mass. 

Telephone, 673 Haymarket. 



ITawtoia. Zoe Q@mpaiiy. 

T^fT sold by xis is cut from Longfellow's Pond, Wellesley 
Awl— i Hills. Water from pond is used in Wellesley publio 
service. The Newton Ice Co. is prepared to furnish a first 
class quality of IPOISTID ICE in West Newton, Newtou- 
ville, Auburndale, Newton Lower Falls and Wellesley Hills. 

MILLER & HATCH, Props. 

P. O. Address, Newton Lower Falls. 



A Hardware Store for a hundred years. 

Barditt & Williams 

Dealers in 

Builders' and General Hardware 
Supplies, Tools and Cntlery. 

20 DOCK SQ., BOSTON. 



LA SELL LEAVES 



69 



15s COLLEGE 
GIRL 

Will always find at our store the LATEST 

CONCEITS IN STATIONERY as well as the other 

necessaries for her college work. 

Economical prices prevail. 



THORP & MARTIN CO. 

FINE STATIONERY SHOP. 

ia MILK STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 

Shreye, Crump & Low Co. 

147 Tremont St., Boston. 

JEWELERS and SILVERSMITHS. 



STATIONERY, CLASS and SOCIETY PINS. 

Designs submitted and estimates furnished. 



The KNICKERBOCKER SHOE 

FOR COLLEGE GIRLS. 

e. in. burt st co. 

Manufacturers. 



Automobile Red. 

Enamel. 

Box Calf. 



1 $3.50 



French Pat. Calf. 
Wax Calf. 
Russet Calf. 



Wide Extension Edges. Heavy or Light Soles. 

Fancy Wing Tips 50c. extra. 
Extension Heels for Golf. All the latest N. Y. Styles 

BOSTON STORE, 40 WEST STREET. 



SEND TO. 

SCKIRmER S MUSIC STORE, 

(The Boston Music Company.) 



26 WEST ST., 



FOB 



BOSTON, MASS. 



Sheet Music, Music Books, Strings, etc. 

Prompt and efficient service as well as advantageous 
price guaranteed. The singer's Guide, the Piano 
Teachers' Guide, and Choir Master's Guide sent gratis 
to any address. 



Cobb, Aldrich & Co. 



Corner of Washington and Kneeland Streets, Boston* 



ALWAYS have in stock 

THE NICEST assortment of 



CRYSTALLIZED VIOLETS. 
All kinds of French Fruits, Glaobs, 
Stuffed Prunes, Salted Almonds, 
Pecans and Peanuts, Violet Sachet, 
Bonbonnierres, French Bonbons, Fancy 
Chocolates, Nougatines, Marshmallovr, 
Opera Caramels, etc. 



CONFECTIONS 

OF THEIR OWN MANUFACTURE 

TO BE FOUND ANYWHERE 



FANCY CRACKERS 

OF EVERY 
DESCRIPTION. 



Also a full line of Stuffed Olives, Pim-Olas, Fancy Pickles, 
Preserves and Condiments especially adapted to Dinner and Evening Parties 



CATALOGUE FORWARDED UPON APPLICATION. 



70 



LASELL LEAVES 



THE DAYLIGHT STORE 



provides every 
convenience 
for satisfac- 
tory shopping — parlor for reading, writing and resting — postoffice — telegraph office — safety eleva- 
tors running to basement and upper doors — every comer thoroughly lighted and ventilated. 
While our effort is to bring an increasing number of customers each d »y to the various 
departments, yet our desire is to have every pukchase and the detail of every tran-action so 
conducted by our employees that a feeling of entire satisfaction will acc >mpany each sale. 
Ladies' Outer Garments, Corsets, Underwear and Shoes are promiuent everyday features 
of our store. 

WINTER AND WASHINBTON 
STREETS, BOSTON. 






THE NEW SCALE 

HALLETT & DAVIS 
PIANOS. 

The recognized standard of the musical world. We 
have no hesitancy in saying that our Piano as made 
today is as near a perfect instrument as is possible to 
manufacture. You should try and bear the New Scale 
Haliett & Davis if you are interested in a beautiful 
toned piano. We can surprise you in price, quality 
and tone. 

Established 60 Years. 179 TREMONT STREET. 



C. W. Davidson, Pres. 
Newtonville. 



F. F. Davidson, Treas. 
Aubumdale. 



THOMAS LONG COMPANY, 

77 Summer St., Boston. 

GOLDSMITHS AND SILVERSMITHS. 

Special designs always in stock. 

Newest ideas in Jewelry, Sterling Silver, Cut Glass, 
Umbrellas and Pocket-books. 
Repairing a specialty. 
Makers of Class and Society Pins and Golf Prizes. 

Dr. W. F. HALL, 
Dentist. 

211 Central Street, Near Station, Auburndale. 

HOURS FROM 8 a. m. till 5 p. m. 

Refers by permission to many patients in this city. 

All Fillings warranted. Only the best of materials used. 

Special attention aiven to Crown and Bridge Work. 

H. B. Thayer 

NEWEST FASHIONS IN SHOES. 

Special discount to students. 
144 TREMONT STREET, BOSTON. 



O 



DD THINGS. 



Brooches, 
Hat Pins, 
Buckles, 
Posters, 
Steins, 
Flags. 

387 Washington St., ■O'CrVT'T' O- TDTTOT_I 
Boston, Mass. £>JiIN 1 GC DUoti. 



O'HEIbb'S 

6tb Avenue 20 to 21st St., N. Y. 

Lifl VlDfl 

Straigbt Frorjt 

CORSETS. 

The Best Product of American Skill, Sur- 
passing in Wearing Qualities and Fit, and 
equalling in finish the best Imported 
Gored Corset sold in New York, and 

Fifty per cent. 
Cheaper in Price. 

They are Strictly Handmade, French 
Gored, Bias Cut and all Wbalebone, and 
we guarantee every pair to give entire 
satisfaction, both as to fit and wearing 
qualities. 



IkSELL £feAVE5 



a 



DUX FE/niMA FACTI." 



VOL. XXVI 



Lasell Seminary, Auburndale, Mass., January, 1901. 



Number 4 



Published monthly during the School year by the Lasell Publishing Association. 



FLORENCE BREWER. 

Local Editor. 
JOANNA F. DEERING, 'oa. 



Editor-in-chie*. 
KATHERINE E. McCOY, *oi. 

Associate Editors. 
BESSIE M. DRAPER, '<». 

8uBSCRI»riON AflENT. 

RUE MCKINNIE- 



IDA M. MALLORY, '03 

Exchanoe Editor. 

LEUA A. WAI.KER. 'oi. 



Business Manager. 
ETHLYN F. BARBER, '01. 



Asst. Business Manager. 
JOANNA F. DEERING, 'oa. 



TERMS, in Advance: One copy, one year (including Postage), $1.00. Single copies, 15 cents. 







ADVERTISING RATES. 








SPACE. 


3 months 


6 months 


9 months 


SPACE. 


3 months 


6 months 


9 months 


1-8 Column, .... 
1-6 .... 
1-4 .... 


$2.00 
3.00 
4.00 


$3.75 
5.00 
6.50 


$5.00 
6.50 
9.00 


1-2 Column, .... 
3-4 " .... 
1 " .... 


$6.50 

9.00 

12.00 


$11.00 
15.00 
19.00 


$15.00 
20.00 
25.00 


The Editors will be glad to receive from the students and Alumna any communications and items of 
interest to the school. 



Editorials. 



WHEN it was announced last fall that 
the Faculty had decided to make a 
change in the programme, having only one 
chapel service a day and that at noon, most 
of the old girls felt that it would be very hard 
to accustom themselves to the change, and 
only a few were in favor of the new plan. 
The girls adapted themselves very readily 
to the change, however, and now but few, if 
any, would care to return to the old plan. 
One of the greatest advantages is that it 
gives a definite amount of time for Mrs. 
Martin's exercises in the morning. These 
exercises, and Mrs. Martin's work in gen- 
eral, cannot be too highly praised and are 



certainly one of Lasell's best advantages. 
The longer one remains at Lasell the more 
one realizes how much this work does for the 
girls. It is often hard and trying, and we 
sometimes think that we disapprove of the 
methods employed, but we cannot deny that 
the results are good. Another advantage 
of the new order is that, having chapel at 
noon, a break is thus made in our work, 
which is a rest and enables us to perform 
better the remainder of our duties. We 
have now more time in the evening than for- 
merly for both study and recreation. Mak- 
ing our walking period ten minutes shorter, 
is a disadvantage, for it was not long enough 



72 LASELL LEAVES 

before, although some of us on these cold, Where the New Century Begun. 

winter days cannot help wishing it only qp HERE is a good deal of sentimental in- 
twenty minutes long instead of forty. It ] terest atta ching to the opening of a 
is not at all necessary, however, that we new century. Which land will see it first? 
should confine ourselves to the one walking Whose eye will be the first to note its ad- 
period; but American girls have not yet vent? Whose hail will usher in its earliest 
learned to appreciate walking, and very few moment ? Like so many of the phenomena, 
walk more than they are obliged to. Con- such as the ec H pse an d t he transit of the 
sidered on all sides, the new plan seems to p i anetS) t h e incoming of the twentieth cen- 
have more advantages than disadvantages, tury was j n a re gi on so spa rsely settled as to 
and we hope that its adoption is permanent. be a i most devoid of human life. 

* ' **" -—— The first moment of the twentieth century, 

Some Curious Facts. the first gecond of j anuary I? I90I) occurred 

There are some curious facts about our in the midst of the p ac ific Ocean, along a 

calendar. It is said that no century can be- i me conforming in general to the meridian 

gin on Wednesday, Friday, or Sunday. The f one hundred and eighty degrees east and 

same calendars can be used every twenty west longitude from Greenwich. There 

years. September always begins on the was here no land of consequence to salute 

same day of the week as December. The t h e new century; no human eye, save, per- 

months of February, March, and November chance, that of the watch on board some tiny 

always begin on the same days. May, June, s hi p> was there to see its entrance, and its 

and August always begin on different days G nly welcome was, perhaps, the last strokes 

from each other, and from every other month f the eight bells marking midnight on board 

in the year. The first and last days of the some steamship or vessel which, by chance, 

year are always the same. These rules do might cross the meridian at that instant. 

not apply to leap year, when comparison is The first people to live in the twentieth 

made between days before and after Feb. 29. century were the Friendly Islanders, for the 

Christian Work. date-line, as it may be called, lies in the Pa- 

• * cific Ocean, just to the east of their group. 

Wise or Otherwise. At that time> although it was already Tues- 

It was not a Lasell girl who sent the fol- day to them, all the rest of the world were 
lowing order by her young husband, when enjoying some phase of Monday, the last 
he went to the office in the morning : Five day of the nineteenth century. At Mel- 
pounds of paralyzed sugar; two cans con- bourne the people were going to bed, for it 
demned milk; one box of fresh salt; three was nearly ten o'clock; at Manila it was two 
pounds of desecrated cod-fish; one-half hours earlier in the evening; at Calcutta the 
pound consecrated yeast. And when the English residents were sitting at their Mon- 
store-keeper asked her if she wouldn't like day afternoon dinner, for it was about six 
some horse radish, said, "horse radish, no! o'clock; and in London, "Big Ben," in the 
we haven't any horse." tower of the House of Commons, was strik- 

Again, it was a Lasell girl who in history ing the hour of noon. In Boston, New 

recitation spoke guilelessly of the excavation York and Washington half the people were 

of Henry IV, meaning, it was generously eating breakfast on Monday morning, while 

supposed, excommunication, instead. Chicago was barely conscious of the dawn. 



LASELL LEAVES 73 

At the same moment San Francisco was in across the Antartic continent to the South 

the deepest sleep of what is popularly called Pole. 

Sunday night, though really the early, dark All who cross the Pacific Ocean gain a 
hours of Monday morning, and half the Pa- practical knowledge of the change of day at 
cific was wrapped in the darkness of the same the date-line. Vessels going west, when 
morning hours, which become earlier to the they reach this line, skip a day, while in go- 
west until at Midway or Brooks Islands it ing east a day is repeated, so that there are 
was but a few minutes past midnight of Sun- two consecutive days of the same name in a 
day night. "week" of eight days. 

Of course, everybody knows that the If one could have truly rapid transit, and 

twentieth century begun on Tuesday, Janu- be able to pass along the meridian of one 

ary I, 1901. It is true that some thought- hundred and eighty degrees from the North 

less individuals have obscured the matter by Pole to the Equator in a moment, he would 

hasty expressions of opinion, setting the date have a strange experience, if the time se- 

for January 1, 1900. But such persons have lected for the journey were a few moments 

forgotten that we begin to count with 1, and after midnight, on the morning of Tuesday, 

that the hundred is not completed till the two January 1, 1 901, the first day of the twenti- 

ciphers have appeared, and then the new eth century. Near the Pole it would be the 

hundred begins, as did the old one, with 1. twentieth century, Tuesday morning; at 

Just as the year 100 with its close marked sixty degrees north latitude it would be 

the completion of the first century, so did Monday morning that was beginning, the 

the year 1900 with its last moments end our last day of the nineteenth century, for here 

nineteenth century, and 1901 begin the it is that the western sweep of the date-line 

twentieth. includes the Aleutian Islands in the Ameri- 

The actual date-line varies from the theo- can day. At thirty-five degrees north lati- 

retical one in a number of places. Starting tude it would be again Tuesday in the new 

at the North Pole, it follows the meridian of century. 

one hundred and eighty degrees to about If a vessel happened to be in the vicinity of 
seventy degrees north latitude, where it the date-line on Sunday night, December 
curves to the east about ten degrees, so as to 30, 1900, it would be possible, at the mo- 
pass through Behring Strait and include all ment of crossing the line, for the watch, him- 
of Siberia in the Russian day. Then it takes self already in the twentieth century, to call 
a reverse curve across to one hundred and back to the helmsman, who would be just at 
seventy degrees east longitude, to include the midnight of the next to the last day in the 
Aleutian Islands in our American day. nineteenth century. Or, if the vessel hap- 
Then in the open ocean it regains one hun- pened to be becalmed just on the meridian, 
dred and eighty degrees, and passes by it would be possible to walk aft into the nine- 
Brooks Island and across the Equator. At teenth century and forward again into the 
about five degrees south latitude it curves twentieth, a veritable turning back of time 
again to the east nearly ten degrees, so as to in his flight. On the other hand, if an east- 
give the Friendly Islands the Australian bound vessel approached the meridian at 
day. It then regains the meridian of one night it might see the nineteenth century 
hundred and eighty degrees just to the south close at midnight of December 31, 1900, 
of Chatham Islands, and follows this line and then have a second closing of the same 



74 LASELL LEAVES 

century the next night at the end of the re- ninety miles to the east of Funafuti, the larg- 
peated day. est of the group. Mitchell Island is just 
Such speculations as these may be carried east of the meridian and almost touching it. 
to any desired extent, and serve to show Ten degrees farther south lies the Fiji 
some of the curiosities of the line along group. The line barely escapes the eastern 
which the day, the year and the century all point of Vanua Levu, the northern-most of 
begin. the large islands, and cuts squarely in two 
The meridian of one hundred and eighty the neighboring minor islands, Rambi and 
degrees east and west of Greenwich trav- Vuna. One hundred miles to the south, 
erses the Pacific Ocean from north to south. Totoya, of the same group, is grazed by the 
While it does not cross any important coun- line, which then passes over five hundred 
try, still these seas are so well sprinkled with miles of ocean to the Kermedec Islands, some 
islands that many lie close to the line, some three or four hundred miles northeast of 
of the larger groups are divided by it, one New Zealand. The meridian passes about 
or two islands are bisected, and at the north seventy-five miles to the east of New Zea- 
and south it encounters parts of continents, land, but is to the west of the adjacent Cha- 
in the extreme north, the line marking tham Islands. South four or five degrees 
one hundred and eighty degrees runs across and just west of the line are the islands of 
Wrangel Land in the Arctic Ocean. For Bounty and Antipodes, the latter of which, 
one or two hundred miles it stretches across in fifty degrees south latitude, are very 
the continent of Asia, passing from Cape nearly the antipodes of London. To the 
North to Cape Tringa, Eastern Siberia, south there are no other islands, and the 
crossing between these. places a quite impor- meridian of one hundred and eighty degrees 
tant arm of the ocean, the Gulf of Anadyr, strikes the southern continent in Victoria 
Siberia extends some ten degrees to the east Land at about eighty degrees south of. the 
of the meridian, Behring Strait being in Ion- Equator. 

gitude one hundred and seventy degrees This is the strict, theoretical position of 

west. From Asia the meridian crosses the date-line, that line along which the day 

Behring Sea to the Aleutian Islands, passing begins, and it would be the actual line itself 

through the narrow channel between Am- but for the fact that every rule made by man 

chitka and two minor islands of the Andre- is subject to exceptions. The exceptions to 

anoffski group. For more than fifteen hun- this rule have gradually crept in through the 

dred miles to the south there is open sea un- manner of colonization or settlement or the 

interrupted by islands important enough to demands of business. In deference to the 

map, till in about twenty-eight degrees north latter some of the recent changes have been 

latitude Midway or Brooks Islands, made made. 

famous b)^ Stevenson in his story of "The The Spaniards going west from their pos- 

Wreckers," lie quite close to the line on the sessions in America carried their day to the 

easterly side. Maurelle Islands, not far Philippine Islands. The Dutch sailing east 

distant, lie to the west of the meridian. took their day with them to the adjacent isl- 

For another long distance, nearly thirty ands of Borneo, Sumatra and Java, and to 

degrees, there is open ocean, till at eight de- China. The circuit of the earth having 

grees south of the Equator the line runs thus been completed, there was the difference 

through the Ellice Islands, passing about of a day between Manila and its neighbors, 



LASELL LEAVES 75 

Manila being behind. As the business in- 19th Century Summarized. 

terests of the different islands brought them 



into closer relationships the absurdity of T RULY this last century of ours has been 

having different day-names in places so close 1 wonderful in its material advance, 

together was the more striking. Accord- which is thus ably summarized by London 

ingly, about the middle of the century the Answers. 

authorities arranged for a unification of the This century received from its predeces- 

dates, and a day was skipped by the Fili- sors the horse; we bequeath the bicycle, the 

pinos, the day being December 31, 1844. locomotive and the motor car. 

They went to bed on the evening of Decern- We received the goose-quill; we bequeath 

ber 30, 1844, and awoke the next morning the typewriter. 

on Tanuary 1 1845. We received the scythe; we bequeath the 

The Russians, who possessed Siberia and mowing machine. 

Alaska, brought eastward the day of St. Pet- We received the hand printing press; we 

ersburg and maintained it on this continent bequeath the cylinder press, 

till Alaska became a part of the United We received the painted canvas; we be- 

States. The Alaskans, in their reckoning q ueath lithography, photography, and color 

of the date, were one day ahead of their photography. 

neighbors, the Canadians, and of our people. We received the hand loom; we bequeath 

When we acquired Alaska we made a change the cotton and woolen factory. 

in the interests of business, deciding that it We received gunpowder; we bequeath 

would be better for all parts of the United lyddite. 

States to have the same day. We set the We received the tallow dip; we bequeath 

date-line to the west ten degrees past the the electric lamp. 

meridian of one hundred and eighty degrees We received the galvanic battery; we be- 
so as to include in our day our outermost queath the dynamo. 

island, Attu. For this reason, Attu, being We received the flint-lock; we bequeath 

in east longitude one hundred and seventy Maxims. 

degrees, is the latest place on the earth to re- We received the sailing-ship; we bequeath 

tain any certain day. the steamship. 

In the same way certain groups of islands We received the beacon signal fire; we 

in the southern Pacific, whose business rela- bequeath the telephone and wireless tele- 

tions are mainly with the Austral continent, g ra phy. 

have been included in the day with Australia We received ordinary light; we bequeath 

and New Zealand, although some of them Roentgen rays. 

are to the east of one hundred and eighty de- And all this on the purely material side, to 
grees. The Friendly Islands and the small- sa Y nothing of the progress in detail that has 
er members of the Fiji group are among made this major progress possible— the ad- 
these. Near at hand and still to the east lie vances in chemistry and metallurgy; the in- 
die Samoa Islands, but authorities differ as vention of machinery and its adaptation to 
to the reckoning of time in them. They manifold processes formerly considered too 
probably also have the day of Australia. intricate for aught but patient work by hand. 

• — • Beyond this is the scientific knowledge ac- 

Some other time isn't any time at all. quired and applied to the lives of the race; 



76 



LASELL LEAVES 



the explorations conducted, and the new 
countries opened up to settlement and prog- 
ress. In politics is found the growth of 
liberal institutions; the leaven of inherent 
rights of manhood has leavened the whole 
lump. And in art, in literature, in music, 
the advance throughout the whole social 
scale is incalculable. 



te My Christmas Vacation. 



College Athletics for Girls. 

Recent statistics show that there is a good- 
ly yearly increase in average chest inflation, 
total strength, and lung capacity among the 
students of colleges for women who are com- 
pelled to take regular exercise. The 
increase in capacity in all directions is al- 
ways more marked in the freshman class, as 
the students are almost invariably new to 
regular scientific exercise, but the growth is 
marked up to the day of graduation. The 
general health of the student's body is cer- 
tainly far better than that of the general run 
of girls of the same age and of the same walk 
in life. 



She Knew the Difference. 

They had the words "visit" and "visita- 
tion" in the reading lesson in a Washington 
public school the other day. Nearly every 
little girl in the class knew quite well what 
"visit" meant, but they were a little at sea 
when it came to "visitation." 

"Now," said the teacher, "I want you to 
tell me what you think it means. It is 
something more serious, more awful, than 
visit. I don't want to tell you what it means 
till you have told me what you think it 
means. What do you think, Anna ?" 

Anna looked a bit doubtful, but plucking 
up courage on the teacher's hint, she spoke : 

"I know what 'visit' means," she said. 
"That's like when Cousin Jack comes to see 
us, and visitation — well, when Aunt Jane 
comes, I guess that's a visitation." 



It was a six days' trip to Williamsport, 
Pa., to visit Mrs. Bragdon's relations, and 
to see Mrs. Bragdon and Belle so far on their 
way to California. Maybe some of you 
don't know that Mrs. Bragdon is Miss Ran- 
som's sister, and that each has two other sis- 
ters who have been pupils at Lasell, and so 
are entitled to record on these pages. Sade, 
Mrs. Hazelet, was the hostess in the fine, old 
mansion where I wooed and was won by the 
oldest of these splendid sisters. We number- 
ed fifteen, including Sade and her five chil- 
dren ; Minn, Mrs. Wagner, and her two, and 
we had a royal good time as you girls say. 
Mrs. Hazelet is a rare mother and manager, 
never flustered or out of temper, quick to see, 
and judicious to plan; withal, one who makes 
everybody instantly at home in her generous 
hospitality. Of Mrs. Wagner and Miss 
Ransom, most of you know already. 

Of other girls in Williamsport, I enjoyed 
seeing Jen Hays Stearns, the happy and cap- 
able mistress of a cosy home, and the careful 
mother of six as fine children as one would 
care to see. She was Miss Ransom's mate 
here in their school days: Rachel Allen, 
('86), whom I met in a store, but missed in 
calling, and Marie Wilson of New York, 
(Ella's sister), who was visiting a school- 
mate, and with whom I had a very pleasant 
chat about Lasell friends and memories. 

I called on but missed Alice Williams 
Huff, (daughter of the present mayor), who 
boasts a lively group of three children. 
Florence Slate, who was at Clio Club; 
Laura Foresman, who lives in Pittsburgh; 
Florence Ryan Donnellan, who lives in Phil- 
adelphia; Nellie Bubb Stevens, who lives in 
Englewood, N. J. Sorry not to see them 
all. C. C. B. 



Mr. Bragdon acknowledges, with thanks, 



LASELL LEAVES 



77 



Christmas cards from : Lillian Myer, Col- 
umbia, Mo.; Bertha Hax Forman, St. 
Joseph, Mo.; Mademoiselle LeRoyer, Mid- 
dletown, Conn.; Josephine B. Chandler, 
Maiden, Mass. ; Mrs. Ida F. Burke, Middle- 
town, Conn.; Edith Weeks Burke, Middle- 
town, Conn.; Alice M. Hotchkiss, Middle- 
town, Conn.; Blanche E. Gardner, Wilkes 
Barre, Penn. ; Evelyn Butler, Mexico City, 
Mexico. Evelyn Butler's card was adorned 
with a very unique and valuable specimen of 
Mexican art, which puts one in mind of 
the priceless feather cloak of the Queens of 
the Ante Cortes days. It is a beautiful lit- 
tle bird of natural feathers. 

By some means this important item has 
been overlooked in our columns, and our 
Principal's well-known modesty — or is it his 
indifference to such things? — has kept us in 
ignorance of it : 

f "Principal Charles C. Bragdon, of Lasell 
Seminary, Auburndale, has received the de- 
gree of LL. D. from his Alma Mater, North- 
western University, Evanston, 111., the only 
degree of this grade given this year. > 

Stayed During Christmas Holidays, 



Christmas Vacation. 



Cole, Marion, 
Brooks, Cleora, 
Blackstock, Isabella, 
Clokey, Mary, 
Hollenbcck, Madge, 
Harris, Mollie, 
McConnell, Georgia, 
Jones, Nell D., 
Lapowski, Leonora, 
Lapowski, Joel, 
Phelps, Adeline, 
Schram, Eo, 
Miller, Mamie, 
Ryder, Ruby. 
Armstrong, Lena, 
Bowland, Marie, 
Woodbury, Lila, 



Chester, Illinois. 

Winchester, Kentucky. 

Shah j ahanpore, India. 

Decatur, Illinois. 

Council Bluffs, Iowa. 

Tyler, Texas. 

Billings, Montana. 

Paris, Illinois. 

San Angelo, Texas. 

Abilene, Texas. 

Springfield, Wisconsin. 

Seattle, Washington. 

Dallas, Texas. 

Kansas City, Mo. 

Rozeman, Montana. 

New York, N. Y. 

Burlington, Vermont. 



Jobley. — Doing anything now, Hobley? 
Hobley. — Yes; writing for the press. 
Jobley. — Stories or editorials? 
Hobley. — Wrappers. 



CHRISTMAS vacation! How happy 
were the girls who were going home, 
leaving us less fortunate ones behind; yet, 
we, too, were glad, because from all previous 
accounts we felt confident that we should 
have a good time, and this, we soon found, 
was no ill-founded confidence. 

The first week every one was busy getting 
Christmas , boxes ready to send home, and 
much pleasure and thought was taken in 
packing these. 

When Christmas morning at last arrived 
we were all greeted in the Chapel, at the 
early hour of seven o'clock, by a big, blazing 
Christmas fire in the open fireplace, over 
which hung a row of stockings, one for each 
of us, filled with all the "goodies" Santa 
Claus delights to bring. In the dining- 
room we found, when we went down to 
breakfast, a very prettily decorated Christ- 
mas tree, around which, on floor and table, 
were heaped the many gifts sent by the 
friends at home and in school to make our 
Christmas as happy as possible. After 
breakfast was over Dr. Gallagher and Miss 
Genn distributed the presents, and, judging 
from appearances, each one was made happy 
by such an armful of gifts as she could 
hardly carry up-stairs. All through the cor- 
ridor were to be heard, "What did you get? 
May I come and see them ?" And the answer, 
"Oh ! I got such a lot of pretty things ! Do 
come and look." At two o'clock dinner 
was announced. It was very much like our 
Thanksgiving dinner in length, but more in- 
teresting, because everybody took part in the 
sport, contributing to the jokes and conun- 
drums that were bandied about. Mr. 
Bragdon accompanied six of us into Boston 
to hear the "Messiah" sung by the Handel 
and Haydn Society, a treat which we all en- 
joyed very much. 



78 



LASELL LEAVES 



So much for Christmas Day. Since the 
principal event of the vacation had now come 
and gone, our interest was thereafter di- 
rected to theatrical pleasures. Nearly every 
one of the girls that stayed here, have now 
seen "Ben Hur," "Quo Vadis," "When We 
Were Twenty-one," and "Oliver Gold- 
smith." But the theatre was not our only 
resource. There were concerts. The 
Symphony concert for December 28 was in 
memory of Governor Wolcott's death, and 
was especially interesting to those who went. 
Moreover, thanks to the kindness of Mr. 
Bragdon, some of us had the privilege and 
pleasure of attending a piano recital by Mr. 
Ossip Gabrilowitsch, a musician of rapidly 
growing renown, and well worth hearing. 
There were outdoor frolics, too. Haskell's 
Pond afforded some good skating, which 
some of us who had never skated before, 
were glad to try. 

New Year's Eve we all decided to go to 
the Episcopal church to attend the special 
service, to watch the Old Year out, and to 
welcome in the New Year, and New Cen- 
tury, as well, though, I believe, all do not 
agree on this point. The time between din- 
ner and 10.30 p. m., when we were to start 
for the church, we spent very enjoyably in 

the gymnasium, dancing and telling ghost 
stories. 

Those of us who hail from India or Texas, 
were expecting a sleigh ride by New Year's 
Day, but we were sadly disappointed. We 
hope, though, to have one before very long. 
Our thanks we feel are due to Mr. Bragdon, 
Dr. Gallagher and Miss Carpenter for the 
very pleasant time we have had, and we hope 
the girls who may stay here next Christmas 
will get as much pleasure out of their holi- 
days as we have from ours this delightful 
Christmas and New Year's of 1900. 

I. T. B. 

L. J. L. 



MARRIAGES 

— Irene R. Thomas to John Ashley Cad- 
well, on Wednesday, December 19, at Proc- 
tor, Vermont. 

— Myrtle Mae Davis to DuRolle Gage, on 
Thursday, January 5, at Topeka, Kan. At 
home Wednesdays in February, Copley 
Square Hotel, Boston. 

— Mary Hannum DeRidder to Waldo 
Ernest Bullard, on Wednesday, December 
19, Saratoga Springs, N. Y. 

— Laura Edith Geohegan to Horace 
Welch, on Wednesday, November 21, Wich- 
ita, Kan. Their home address is Tayloa, 
Texas. 

— Alice Rix Taylor to Edgar Clifford Pot- 
ter, on Tuesday, January 15, Buffalo, N. Y. 
Their address (after February), will be 65 
Oxford Road, Newton Centre, Mass. 

— Elsa Katherine Doepke to Dr. Henry 
Hamilton Wiggers, on Christmas evening, 
December 25, "Mearstead," Cincinnati. 
Their address (after Feb 1.) will be 2360 
Auburn avenue, Mt. Auburn, Cin. 

— Helen Louise White to Herbert Au- 
gustus Fogg, on Tuesday, January 15, Ban- 
gor, Maine. 

m m 

His Quotation. 

"Algernon is very interesting," said the 
stockbroker's daughter. 

"What does he talk about?" inquired her 
father. 

"Why, he's ever so well posted in Shake- 
spearian quotations." 

"Young woman," said the financier, stern- 
ly, "don't you let him deceive you. Don't 
you let him make sport of your ignorance. 
There ain't no such stock on the market." — 
Tid Bits. 



When all treasures are tried, truth is the 

best. — William Langland. 

Conformity to the world will never con- 
vert it. — Theodore L. Cuyler, D. D. 



LASELL LEAVES 



79 




PERSONALS. 

— Carita Curtis, ('99), is in Omaha, and 
is soon to make her debut. 

— Nellie Richards, ('93), sends a pretty 
Christmas card, by way of greeting for the 
holidays, and Mr. Henry Turner, a unique 
check, calling for three hundred and sixty- 
five and a fourth days, to be paid to the prin- 
cipal. Father Time's Banking House is re- 
sponsible for the payment. One wonders 
whether Mr. Turner may not have over- 
drawn his deposit at Time's bank. 

— Jane My rick Gibbs, ('98), sends sub- 
scription to the Leaves, best wishes for the 
New Year, and an interesting scrap of news 
about Gertrude Watson Linscott, ('99), 
now mother of a diminutive Miss Linscott, 
whose other name we as yet do not know. 

— Dorothy Manning, ('95) sends us 
greetings and good wishes. Elsa Doepke 
was married, she says, on Christmas even- 
ing to Dr. Wiggers — a quiet wedding. 
Margie Schuberth, ('96), was at Dayton 
when Dorothy wrote, and Ella Ampt 
Haman, ('96), and her husband spent 
Christmas in Wyoming. Dorothy is 
housekeeper at home now, and likes it. Be- 
sides this she is giving her attention to 
music, and is a member of a literary club. 
She puts her name on the Leaves' subscrip- 
tion list. 

— Florence Roby is to continue her violin 
lessons this winter under Mr. Goldstein. 

— Avila Grubbs, ('99), tells of her pleas- 
ant visit with Katherine White, ('oo), and 



of having seen one day during her stay in 
Paris, Grace Washburn, ('97), but with no 
chance to speak to her. Nellie Feagles, 
('97), and her mother she met, and had sev- 
eral chats with. They are enjoying very 
much their days in Europe, and are disposed 
to stay on for awhile. Avila and her moth- 
er and brother met Elizabeth Cossar at Mun- 
ich — Elizabeth and her sister, Mrs. Smith, 
with whom she was traveling. They all 
went together to see the Passion Play. 
Avila's brother is at Paris for perhaps two 
years, so that Mrs. Grubbs and Avila may go 
over next year, also, for awhile. This trip 
they spent a month in Paris, and the rest of 
their time in Switzerland, Germany, Hol- 
land, and Austria, staying awhile in Carlsbad 
for Mrs. Grubb's health. On her way home, 
after returning to America, Avila spent a 
day or so with Clara Davis, ('98), who is 
in better health than she was, and saw there 
Anna Ampt, ('98), "as jolly as ever, and 
eager for Lasell news." A New Year's card 
sent by the house for which Mr. Grubbs is 
manager, looks odd with its combination of 
English and Spanish on the two sides of it. 
This is how they say it in Spanish, "Feliz 
Ano Nuevoi" 

— The Hartwell girls, we are grieved to 
learn, lost their mother last year. Abbie 
expects soon to be married to a gentleman 
from Orange, N. J. 

— Helen Winslow says of herself, "I am 
a very busy person, both in office hours and 
outside, and get as much out of life as most 
people, I think." Thinks she'd like to make 
us a visit sometime, "to note changes," but 
doesn't promise one yet awhile. 

— Idelle .Phelps sends a pleasant letter 
She was in Boston last summer, but did not 
come to Lasell since she learned that Mr. 
Bragdon was then away. She and the 
family were south for about six months last 
year. Of the Denver girls she says she 



80 LASELL LEAVES 

does not see very much, being away so much whom she has heard, she says only, "They all 

of her time; but speaks of meeting Mamie seem happy in their several lives." 

McMann Kellogg frequently at luncheons — For Ada Marsh, in her recent sorrow, 

and the like, and of Carrie Brown Carsell's we have sincere sympathy. She was in 

('89), absorption in her family. Mrs. Boston for a few days in December, and 

Kellogg has two fine boys, and her husband's came out to see Mr. Bragdon during that 

health is much improved. Idelle has in the time. 

market a new invention of hers, an eye- — Agnes Flaherty, ('00), is still in Cam- 
glass holder, which she thinks may presently bridge, studying music with Miss White, 
prove profitable. and in addition German and French. She 

— Alice Ashley's, ('00), report of herself sends Leaves subscription, 

is, "safe at home again in the land of ice and ' — Flattie Freebey, ('95), has taken up the 

snow;" she had just been enjoying her first study of law as a profession, and seems quite 

sleigh ride of the year. She is full of ap- captivated with it. Is helping herself along 

preciation of her visit with us, and of delight nicely at Ann Arbor, and takes a cheery view 

in it. She sends an item concerning Laura of things generally; has been chosen vice- 

Geohegan, to be found in another column, president of her class, and when she wrote 

Mabel Coffin traveled all over Europe last was expecting to respond at a coming class 

summer with a friend, with whom she is banquet, to the toast, "Women at the Bar." 

still — in Paris, Mabel studying French and Hon. George Fred Williams addressed her 

German; the friend, art. class a short time since, and was much liked. 

— Mary Hazlewood Renwick writes of her By the way, Hattie has a sister whose hus- 

home and children and husband. Busy days band is in a law-office. She sends a pretty 

these are to her. Little four-year-old Robert Michigan banner, and, subscription to the 

has two baby sisters, twins, Alice and Julia, Leaves, v 

a little more than a year old now, and very ■ — Caralyn Ebersole Martin, ('85), 'sends 

good babies, indeed, Mary says, both being charming photo of a manly-looking little son 

strong and well, that is natural. She sends of hers. Donald Ebersole Martin, six and 

photo of these tiny, little women, and, if the a half years old. 

sun has told the truth on the card, we can as- — Martina Grubbs Riker also sends a fine 

sure you that they are as pretty a pair of picture of herself and her two sweet little 

babies as you'll see in a day's journey. She daughters, Maria and Martha, nine and two, 

hears occasionally from Nellie Osgood Card, respectively. 

who lives in Somerville, Mass., and is the — Mary Smith, "who is learning at home 

happy possessor of three fine boys of her the fine arts of housekeeping and sewing, 

own. hears, occasionally from Clara Hammond, 

— Julia Aldrich Williams speaks with re- and has had letters from Emily Eaton 

gret of Annie Young's, ('97), leaving St. Thomas, telling about her early efforts at 

Louis for Cincinnati ; says all the girls were housekeeping in that new home of hers, 

loth to have her go. Mary Johnson Whit- — Our Marion Josselyn, Mrs. Charles N. 

ney, ('98), she says, is a good neighbor of Young of recent "transformation," is board- 

hers, with whom she has frequent Lasell ing at 7 Belmore Terrace, Jamaica Plain, 

chats. Nora Burroughs, ('97), visited Take any Jamaica Plain car, and get off at 

Julia in the fall. Of the other girls from Bolyston street. Some of the neighboring 



LASELL LEAVES 



81 



Lasellians will want to give her welcome, I 
am sure. Kathryn Bucknum and Lena were 
with her, and we had a good time. 
Kathryn is spending a few weeks with Lena, 
and has just come from being some Lasell 
girl's bridesmaid — I forget who — she ought 
to tell you herself ! 

— The Valkyrie Flats, the three-story 
brick apartment building in which Emma 
Goll Dacey, ('98), lives, has recently been 
purchased by Joseph Jefferson, the famous 
actor, for $87,500. 

— Florence Wilber and Ella Spalding re- 
centlv made their formal entrance into so- 
ciety. 

— Ella Cotton, ('00), saw Alice Kimball, 
('98), on the street the other day, well and 
hearty as ever. 

— Sally Ellwood Wirth is to make New 
York her home henceforth. Carol Case, 
('99), was to visit her during the holidays. 

— Grace Richardson is at home in Erie, 
and is enjoying dances and dinners to her 
heart's content. She expects to visit in Bos- 
ton this winter. 

I had a delightful call the other evening on 
Annie Mac Keown, Mrs. Geo. M. Chase, 105 
Tremont street, Maiden, where she "ladies" 
it over a charming suite of rooms to her 
heart's content, and apparently to that of 
Mr. Chase, who seemed on the whole, beauti- 
fully resigned to the condition of things. 

Then going on to Linden, I had some 
bread and some cold roast chicken, and some 
peach preserves, which seemed to me most 
toothsome, and some cake that I suppose 
was all right, although being cake I didn't 
notice it much, all of which, except the 
chicken, was made by Rosa Best, I mean the 
Rosa Best, the daughter of Rev. E. S. Best, 
and not the Rosa Best of Portland. 



has been received of the death of relatives of 
several of our friends, to whom we would 
express our sincere sympathy in their dis- 
tress. Mary Yocum has lost her dear 
mother; Mary Smith her uncle, Charles El- 
mer Smith; Grace Garland Etherington, her 
mother, Mrs. Jas. G. Garland, long promi- 
nent in her home city of Biddeford, and 
highly esteemed for her abilities and high 
character; and Sophy White her father, 
Judge J. W. F. White, a notable man in his 
town and county, admired and loved as a 
man, trusted and loved as an official. He 
was nearly eighty years old. 




DEATHS. 

— Since the last issue of the Leaves, word 



Dec. 6. — A very interesting lecture on 
Hawthorne given by Mr. Leon Vincent. 
Among other quotable things Mr. Vincent 
said that a genius is "anyone who deviates 
from the normal"; and that to three names 
especially people are indebted for certain 
standards of excellence: Irving, the founder 
of American literature; Poe, and Haw- 
thorne. Mr. Vincent we always hear with 
great pleasure, as he is a man who has some- 



82 



LASELL LEAVES 



thing to say, and who knows how to say it. 

Dec. 13. — Again Mr. Vincent talked to us 
on American Humorists, dwelling particu- 
larly on Artemus Ward and Mark Twain. 
The dominant note in foreign criticism of 
things American, he said, is superciliousness 
and the thing they expect of American liter- 
ature is a certain coarseness and roughness, 
failing to find which in any work they 
straightway pronounce it un-American. 
American wit they especially fail to appre- 
ciate. The lecturer then noted the chief 
characteristics of our humor, giving cour- 
ageousness a prominent place among these. 
The American wit dares to be as funny as it 
can, which, as in the case of the two humor- 
ists mentioned, proves to be very funny in- 
deed. In conclusion he gave a word of ad- 
vice: "Never praise our own literature. It 
is not worth speaking of if it does not speak 
for itself." We hope for the pleasure of 
hearing Mr. Vincent again. He may be 
very sure of a hearty welcome from Lasell 
girls at any time when good luck sends him 
our wav. 

Dec. 1 7. — We were favored with a music- 
al treat in the public rehearsal given by the 
best talent among our music pupils. The 
program was as follows : 

Pianoforte Quartette, Overture Commedietta, 

Gurlitt 
Misses Schram, J. Lapowski, Bowers and Buffinton. 
Chorus. Before the Sun Awakes the Morn, Goate 

Orphean Club. 
Violin. La Cinquantaine, Gabriel-Marie 

Miss Blackstock. 
Songs. Wandering. 
Whither? 
From Die Schone Mullerin, Schubert 

Miss Draper. 
Pianoforte. Mazurka, Reinhold 

Miss G. Stone. 
Song. Norwegian Song, Henri Loge" 

Miss Gallagher. 
Chorus. Ave Maria, Mendelssohn 

Orphean Club. 

Pianoforte. Valse Lente, Schiitt 

Miss Lair, 



Song. 



Nevin 



Nightingale's Song, 

Miss Pinkham, 
Violin Duo, Wohlfhart 

Misses Blackstock and LeScure. 
Songs. When I am dead. 

Ask Not. Frederick Barry 

Miss Hamilton. 
Pianoforte Quartette. Polonaise. Op. 40 Chopin 

Misses Noyes, Meissner, Bennett and Lum. 

Chorus. Swing Song, Lohr 

Orphean Club. 

Jan. 9. — Our first night at Lasell, after 
the Christmas vacation, was enjoyably spent 
in listening to a lecture on Egyptian Art, by 
Mr. George Sawyer Kellogg, instructor in 
the history of art, Teachers' College, Colum- 
bia University, N. Y. He took us with him 
across the seas into Egypt, and there into its 
mysterious old tombs, making us intensely 
interested in the beliefs and customs of the 
ancient Egyptians. Their ideas of the earth 
and sky seemed strangest of all to us and 
made us glad that we live in more enlight- 
ened times. 



A Word to Lasell Shoppers. 

The importance of trading with the firms 
who advertise in the Lasell Leaves can- 
not be overestimated. We should not ex- 
pect their patronage if we do not give them 
our support in return. Another way for 
Lasell girls to be loyal ! 

The lease which conveys the Boston & Al- 
bany railroad to the New York Central is 
still on its travels. It is making a tour of 
the state from Boston to Berkshire, spend- 
ing a few days in the registry of deeds of 
each county. It has already been recorded 
in Suffolk, in Middlesex, in Norfolk, and in 
Worcester, and has got as far as Hampden. 
It is a voluminous document, and it is, ap- 
parently travelling by petite vitesse. 



Advice is like castor oil — easy enough to 
give, but dreadful uneasy to take. — Josh 
Billings. 



LASELL LEAVES 83 

News of the Class of 1900. sewing and reading and music, her time is 
well taken. She has a Sunday-school class, 

Elsie Reynolds is spending a quiet, but and is a member of a mission study class, 

busy winter at her home. She says she has She also belongs to a charity club, and goes 

been putting into practice her Lasell lessons Friday evenings to a boys' club, which is 

in cooking, and is now able to make an eat- formed of news-boys. 

able cream soup. In September she spent a Helen Ramsdell is spending a quiet win- 
week in New Bedford with Ella Brightman ter taking French and German lessons in 
Ricketson, who is housekeeping in a very Boston. 

pleasant home. From there she came to Katharine White is very busy with so- 

Auburndale and visited Helen Dyer and La- cial and home duties this winter. She is 

sell for a time. Shortly before Christmas taking music lessons. Her church work 

Elsie and Edna Cooke lunched together in is a mission Sunday-chool class, and an In- 

Hartford. termediate Christian Endeavor Society. 

Ella Cotton is at Miss Chamberlyn's Katharine wrote that she had put her Lasell 

School in Boston, and has favored Lasell millinery lessons to good use in making her 

with several calls this winter. She sent us own hats, and one for her mother this win- 

a bright letter full of news of old Lasell ter. She expects to attend Alice Taylor's 

girls. wedding this month, and then go home with 

Jessie McCarthy visited Florence Wil- Amy Kothe for a visit. Alice expects 
ber in December, and says that Floss is an Louise Gurley, Alice Ashley, Mabel Wood- 
ideal hostess. While there she saw Daisy ward, Alice Jenckes, Mabel Martin and Amy 
Cook, "who has not changed at all." She Kothe at her wedding. From a Parkers- 
met Elizabeth and Katherine Robertson and bury paper we learn of Katharine's formal 
their mother one day this summer in introduction into society, which was a bril- 
Chicago, Jeanette Knights and Jess attended liant event. Mr. and Mrs. White and 
Helen Harris' debut, which was one of the Katharine, assisted by Mr. and Mrs. Wil- 
events of Chicago society. While Joseph Ham White, received their guests in the 
Jefferson was filling his engagement in drawing-room, which was decorated with 
Chicago, Jessie was fortunate enough to southern smilax and red carnations. Dur- 
have a little chat with him. Mr. Jefferson, ing the appointed hours about three hundred 
who is an old acquaintance of her father's, guests enjoyed Mr. and Mrs. White's hos- 
said that he would be delighted to have an pitality. 

opportunity to visit Lasell. We certainly We were favored with a visit from Alice 

should all be more than delighted to have Ashley a short time before Christmas. Alice 

him come. is giving a few music lessons this winter, 

Blanche Gardner is studying music and and when she wrote was busy with a Christ- 
German this winter. She spent Thanks- mas cantata. She has a position as church 
giving in Philadelphia with her brother, and organist, and drills a choir class of seven- 
then paid Helene Wiedenmayer a visit. She teen little girls, 
also visited Mary Davis after Christmas. Edith Bailey is at present visiting 

Anna Ives says she never spent a happier Jeanette Knights. While in Chicago she 

winter, but that she will never fail to appre- hopes to see Ethel Cornell, Helen Harris, 

ciate all that Lasell did for her. Between and Jessie McCartney. 



84 



LAS ELI. LEAVES 



She met Mabel Currie at a reception there. 
Edith is studying German this winter. 

Emilie Kothe is reading German and 
belongs to a literature class this year. She 
says that she looks back to the good times 
she had at Lasell, and almost wishes they 
could come again, but she feels that she has 
other duties now. Amy is to be one of 
Alice Taylor's bridesmaids, and expects to 
take Katharine White and Alice Jenckes 
home with her after the wedding. She also 
hopes to have Blanche Gardner and Edith 
Bailey pay her a visit soon. 

Roe Porter and her mother are spending 
the winter in Detroit, and are very much 
delighted with the city. Roe is studying 
art at the Detroit Art Academy, and tak- 
ing piano lessons. 

A Vassar girl writes : "I haven't seen a 
man in a month of Sundays. We were out 
taking a 'constitutional' Saturday and came 
across a scarecrow in a cornfield. All the 
girls ran for it at once, and I only managed 
to secure a part of one of the skirts of its 
coat. Still, it was something." — Pittsburg 
Chronicle-Telegraph. 

January. 

Though the long, frosty nights of the 'winter are 

here, 
This month is the dawn of a happy New Year. 

— Clifford Howard. 

January was named for the old Italian god 
Janus, the deity with two faces, one looking 
into the past, and the other into the future. 
Janus was worshiped as the sun god and was 
considered the author of the year, with its 
seasons, months and days. His temples 
were built with four equal sides, each side 
containing a door and three windows. The 
doors were emblematic of the four seasons, 
and the windows of the three months belong- 
ing to each. 

The snowdrop, which means consolation, 
is January's flower, and the garnet, signify- 



ing constancy, is its gem. Gabriel is the 
presiding genius of January. 

Little Language Slips. 

A teacher in a famous eastern college for 
women has prepared for the benefit of her 
students the following list of "word phrases 
and expressions to be avoided" : 

Set a watch on your lips, and if you are 
accustomed to making these "slips" try to 
substitute the correct expression. But don't 
be content with that alone. 

Learn why the preferred expression is cor- 
rect, and this of itself will so fix it in your 
mind that you will soon use it unconsciously : 

"Guess" for "suppose" or "think." 

"Fix" for "arrange" or "prepare." 

"Ride" for "drive" interchangeably. 

"Real" as an adverb, in expressions such 
as "real" good for "really" good. 

"Some" or "any" in an adverbial sense; 
for example; "I have studied some" for 
"somewhat"; "I have not studied any" for 
"at all." 

"Some" ten days for "about" ten days. 

Not "as" I know for "that" I know. 

"Try" an experiment for "make" an ex- 
periment. 

Singular subjects with contracted plural 
verb; for example: "She don't skate well" 
for "she doesn't skate well." 

"Expect" for "suspect." 

"First rate" as an adverb. 

"Right away" for "immediately." 

"Party" for "person." 

"Promise" for "assure." 

"Posted" for "informed." 

Just "as soon" just "as lief." — Denver 
Post. 

m m 

The Old and The New. 

E'en while he sings, he smiles his last, 
And leaves our sphere behind. 

The good Old Year is with the past; 
Oh, be the New as kind! 

— W. C. Bryant. 



LAS ELL LEAVES 



85 



NUTS TO CHACK. 

A member of New York's school examin- 
ing board believes in making children think. 
Among his test questions in mental arithme- 
tic are the following: 

1. "There are four cats. Each sits in 
the corner of a room. In front of each cat 
is another cat. Every cat is sitting on a 
cat's tail. How many cats are in the room ? 

2. Six birds are sitting on a fence, when 
along comes a boy with a gun. He shoots 
one of them. How many birds are left on 
the fence?" 

Many and diverse were the answers. 
Some children of a larger growth whose 
school-days are over, had to use their reason- 
ing powers to discover that there were four 
cats only, each sitting on her own tail, vis a 
vis to Puss in the opposite corner. 

In regard to the second question, of course 
the five unharmed birds would fly away at 
the first gun-shot, and none would remain on 
the fence. 

After the scholars had been adding and 
dividing apples and oranges in all their com- 
binations, he gave them another puzzler. 
Looking up at the time-piece he said : "Chil- 
dren, it is two o'clock. If three clocks hung 
on the wall, what time would it be?" 

"Six o'clock," was the quick and unani- 
mous answer. When, an hour later, the 
gong struck for dismissal, he said, with a 
quizzical smile : "It is three o'clock now — 
time to go home. If three clocks were on 
the wall, what time would it be?" 

Their lesson had been learned. 



To hear folks talk about an "influential 
man" you would think that influence meant a 
big bank account, or at least the control of a 
squad of voters. But the really influential 
men of a community are not always those 
that get into the papers and on the platforms. 
Often the most "influential man" is — a wo- 
man! The person best loved and most 
imitated is the most influential. 

What is your most influential organ? 
Your tongue. What commandment is 
mest frequently broken ? The ninth. (It's 
against false witness — but you ought 
to know.) Probably not oftener than once 
a year will it be necessary or helpful for you 
to say anything depreciatory of any else. 
For the rest of the time, if you can't say 
something good of men, don't talk about 
them at all. Talk about automobiles. 



Kernels. 

It is a great thing just to live a fine life. 
Think : everything noble that you do in- 
fluences yourself. It may not influence an- 
other soul (it probably zmll), but your are 
sure that it will influence your soul. And 
you are to live forever. Forever. Is n't it 
worth while ? 



— "Newtowne, September 3, 1634. At 
the court held in Newtowne," it was ordered 
that no person shall take tobacco publicly, 
under the penalty of eleven shillings, nor 
privately in his own house, or in the house of 
another, before strangers; and that two or 
more persons shall not take it anywhere un- 
der aforesaid penalty. Thus the new town 
was to be kept clean. 

ANOTHER ADDRESS. 

Some time ago we published in the 
Leaves a list of oddities in the line of 
addresses upon envelopes designed to reach 
Lasell, usually, of course, penned by strang- 
ers. The following is in the same line, 
though not so amusing altogether as certain 
of those above mentioned. This was lately 
received : 

To the Regents of 

Laselle College 

for Girls, 

Mass. 



Your next duty is just to determine what 
your next duty is. — George Macdonald. 



86 



LASELL LEAVES 



The Centre of Population. 

The Census Bureau has issued the fol- 
lowing : 

The centre of population is in the follow- 
ing position: Latitude, 39.9.36; longitude, 

8548.54. 

In ten years the centre of population has 
moved westward 16 minutes 1 second, about 
fourteen miles, and southward, 2 minutes, 
20 seconds, or about three miles. It now 
rests in Southern Indiana, at a point about 
seven miles southeast of the city of Colum- 
bus. 

♦ < » 

SUBSCRIBE NOW. 

Now is the time to send in your sub- 
scription to the Leaves, girls. You all enjoy 
the items about the girls you knew here, and 
should not deprive yourself of this bond of 
union with your old friends and your school 
home. If you have any news of yourself, or 
of any of the girls, let us have it for our 
"Personals." We thank those who have 
already done this. 



Foot Anatomy. 

Is a branch of science that the skilled shoe 
maker has to thoroughly master. The 
makers of 




have, after years of experience, acquired a 
knowledge enabling them to produce shoes 
that have a snug, glove-like fit at the heel, 
ankle and instep, seldom found even in the 
finest custom-made shoes, and they reveal a 
style and individuality of their own which all 
good dressers appreciate. 

(Forty styles in all Leathers.) 



Mwm " S3.5D 



Pair. 



Shepard, Norwell & Co., 

Winter Street, Boston. 



Business Established 1817. 



JOHN H. PRAY & SONS GO. 



Wholesale and retail dealers in 



CARPETS -ajstd ZR/CTO-S 



of both Foreign and Domestic Manufacture; also 



Curtains, Draperies, Portieres 



and all 

descriptions 

of choice 



Upholstery Fabrics, 



^-PRICES ALWAYS MODERATE.^ 



croiEiTsr is. :FR,_A."3r & sonsrs oo. 

Oldest and Lar^ett Carpet House in 9Tew Engrland. 

PRAY BUILDING, Opposite Boylston St. 

6 5 8 WASHINGTON STREET, BOSTON. 6 5 8 



LA SELL LEAVES 



87 




C. F. Hovey & Co. 

33 Summer Street. 
42 Avon Street. 



The exchanges received are : The Cres- 
set, The Adelphian, The Mirror, The Pen- 
nant, The Mount Holyoke, High School 
Record, Polytechnian, The Quill, Smith 
Academy Record, The Wesleyan Literary 
Monthly, and The College Rambler. 

The following have been favored with 
calls from members of their family : Misses 
Davis, Kneeland, Clokey, Barker, S. 
Lawrence, Rogers, A. Smith. 

Former pupils : — Katherine Josephine 

Bucknum, Lena Josselyn, Mrs. Marion Jos- 

selyn Young, Marion Safford, Jessie Hay- 
den, Emma Cleaves. 



, Mass, 

Importers of 



Dress Goods, Silks, 
Cloaks, Suits, Laces, 

Underwear, Small Wares. 

Eo Jo States* 

^rt ^Needlework, Sofa "Pillows, 

Banners, etc. 

175 TREMONT ST. (Near Tremont Theatre.) 

BONBON? 

arj<l 

CHOCOLATES 

Delicious Ice Crezin? Soda. 

45 TREMONT STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 




THE BEST IS NONE TOO GOOD 
FOR A LASELL GIRL. 




WE have been chosen to make, for MEMBERS OP THE CLASS OP 1901, the BEST 
and MOST ARTISTIC PHOTOGRAPHS they have ever had. 

Members' of other classes will be given a VERY LOW SCHOOL RATE upon our 
HIGH ART PRODUCTIONS. 

21 WEST STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 



88 



LASELL LEAVES 



FREEMAN & FLETCHER, 
THE FLORISTS. 

12 CHARLES STREET, AUBUHNDALE. 

Nearest Green bouses to Lasell. 

Long Distance Telephone. 

Mrs. C. H. HALL, 

DRESSMAKER. 

Work done at reasonable prices. 

Special rates to students. 

490 AUBURN STREET, AUBURNDALE. 



SHOES FOR 
YOUNG LADIES. 

Neivest Shapes. Newest Styles for Gym- 
nasium, Tennis, Walking and Dress. 

WE GIVE TEN PER CENT. DISCOUNT 
TO AL.I, ZASEIL STUDENTS. 

THE HENRY H. 
TUTTLE CO., 

Cor. WASHINGTON and WINTER STS., 
BOSTON. 



SPHIfiGE^ B^OS. CO. 
CLlOAK;, SUIT and pUH HOUSE 

155 TREMONT STREET, NEAR WEST STREET. 

Ladies' Coats, Capes, Suits, Furs, Golf Capes, Golf Skirts, Walking 

Skirts, Waists, Traveling Rugs, etc. 

Superior Grade Furs a Specialty. Discount to Students. 

NEW CUSTOVI DEPARTMENT. FINEST IN THE CITY. SKILLED MANAGEMENT. 
COURTEOUS ATTENTION. PROMPT EXECUTION OF ORDEUS. 



Adainw Ac Gilbert, 

OPTICIANS. 

MANUFACTURERS of Spectacles and Eye Glasses, and Im- 
porters of Ope. a, Field and Marine Glasses and Optical 
Goods of every description. Oculists' prescription work a 
specialty. 

165 Tremont Street, Boston. 



FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

OF WEST NEWTON, MASS. 

James H. Nickerson. Pres. A. R. Mitchell, Vice-Pres. 

Edward P. Hatch, Cashier. 

General Banking, Collection and Exchange. 
Capital, $100,000. 

Business hours dailv, 8.30 to 12 a m. and 1 to 3 p. m. 
Saturdays. 8.30 a. m. to 12 m. Safe deposit boxes to rent in 
ne w fire and burglar proof vault. 

ELLIOT W. KEYES 



TAYLOR BLOCK, 



AUBURNDALE. 



Apothecary. 



Drugs, Medicines and Toilet Articles. 
California Perfumes. Confections. 



Rockwell and Churchill. 



printers 

THIRTY-NINE AROH STREET, 
B03TON, MASS. 



SCHOOL ANNUALS, 
ANNOUNCEMENTS, 
CATALOGUES. 



PRINTER3 OF LA3BLL OATALOOUB. 



C. RAYMOND di LUC CI, 

CHOICE FRUITS, CANOY, NUTS, ETC. 

C GARS AND TOBACCO. 

365 AUBURN STREET, corner ASIC STRJEB2 

AUBURNDAIE, MASS. 

B. ». COLE 



MUTTON, LAMB, VEAL, 

POULTRY and GAME 

WHOLE SALE AND RE TAIL. 

Stalls 13 and 15, Faneuil Hall Market, Boston, 

Telephone connection. 

George W. Kimball & Co., 

Wholesale and retail dealers In 

Poultry, Game, Beef, Mutton, Lamb and Veal. 

Basement, No. 32a North Street, opposite Merchants' 
Row, Boston. 

Telephone 927 Haymarket. 
Howard M. Smith. Albert P. Smith. 

SMITH BROTHERS. 

(Successors to Geo. H. Phil brook & Co.) 

Butter, Cheese, 2±Jugf® 

Stalls No. 2 aud 4, 
Faneuil Hall Market, Boston, Mass. 

Telephone, Haymarket 884. 



LASELL LEAVES 



89 




Ladies' Shirt and Golf Waists, 
$5.00 to $20.00. 

From Madras, Oxfords, Cheviot, French 
Percales, English and French Flannels, 
Silk and Moire Poplin. 



Blanket Wraps 

For the Nursery. 
For the Sick Room. 
For the Bath. 

For Steamer Traveling. 
For the Railway Carriage. 
For Yachting. 
For Men, Women, Children and the 
Baby, $2.75 to $35, with Hood and 
Qirdle complete. 



A Special Department for 

Ladies' Golf Waists, 
Bicycle and Golf Skirts, 
Entire Golfing Suits. 

GOLF CLUBS, 
GOLF BALLS and 
CADDY BAGS. 




NOYES BROS. 

Washington and Summer Streets, 

BOSTON, Mass., U. S. A. 



FURS. 



FURS. 



COLLARETTES, 
STORM COLLARS, 
SCARFS and MUFFS. 



SPECIAL DISCOUNT TO LASELL 
STUDENTS. 



Edw. Kakas & Sons 

162 Tremont St. 



DAVIS, fllAPIN CO. 

J. A. BARKER, President. 

Commission Merchants and Wholesale 
Dealers in Foreign and Domestic 

Fruits and Produce. 

83 and 85 Paneuil Hall Market, 

Cellar 15 South Side, 

Boston, Mass. 

Telephone Haymarket 777. 



MILLS & DEERING, 

Receivers and Dealers in Fine Grades of 

BUTTER 

AND STRICTLY FRESH FGG8. 

CHAS. W. HICCINS, 

Choice Family Groceries. 

Teas, Coffees, Spices, Canned Goods, Fancy 
Crackers, Fruit, Nuts and Confections. 

Davis Block, 417 Auburn St., Auburudale- 



90 



LASELL LEAVES 



JOSHUA THORNDIKE. 



CHAS. W. 8PEAE 



JOSHUA THORNDIKE <fc CO. 



DEALERS IK 



MUTTON, LAMB and VEAL 

Stalls 3 and 5 New Faneuil Hall Market, 
BOSTON, MASS. 

Edward E. Babb & Co. 

25 Arch St., Boston, Mass. 

Dealers in 

SCHOOL BOOKS and SCHOOL SUPPLIES 

D. A. HOWE 

273 MAIN STREET, WORCESTER, MASS. 

WHOLESALE GROCER. 

Gallons Canned Goods of all kinds and of the best 
quality a specialty. Teas and Coffees. 



Dr. GEORGE A. BATES, 

TAYLOR BLOCK, AUBURNDALE. 

DENTIST. 

Office hours. — Mondays, Wednesdays, Thursdays 
and Saturdays, 8 a. m. to 4 p. m. 



If YOU Wish tO Buy Send to us for prices or 

othev Information. We 
carry the largest stock of 
any store in New England, 
and can furnish any hooks 
in print at the shortest 
notice. We can save you 

money. Catalogue of special bargains mailed free. 






DE WOLFE, FlSKE & CO. 
361 and 365 Washington St., Boston, Mass. 

pTfeRYTHING 




TR«OK MAW 



FINEST ROAD-BED ON THE CONTINENT. 



Boston and Albany Railroad. 



THROUGH CAR SERVICE IN EFFECT SEPTEMBER 20, 1900. 



No. 7 — Leaves Boston at 8.30 a. m. except Sunday. Wagner buffet drawing-room car, Boston to Albany. 
No. 15 — Leaves Boston at 10.45 a. m. daily. Wagner vestibuled buffet library-smoking car and vestibuled 

sleeping cars. Boston to Chicago, via L. S. & M. S. R. R. to St. Louis via Big Four 

Route. Dining car service. 
No. 19 — Leaves Boston at 2.00 p. m. daily. The North Shore Special Wagner buffet vestibuled sleeping 

cars, Boston to Cleveland and Chicago. I 

No. 23 — Leaves Boston at 3.30 p. m. except Sunday. Wagner buffet vestibuled 'sleeping cars, Boston to 

Niagara Falls. Tourist sleeping car Boston to Chicago. 
No. 37 — Leaves Boston at 6.00 p. m. daily. Wagner vestibuled sleeping car, Boston to Cleveland and 

Cincinnati via L. S. & M. S. R. R. ; also Wagner vestibuled sleeping car, Boston to Detroit 

and Chicago via M. C. R. R. 
No. 63 — Leaves Boston at 11.00 p. m., except Saturday. Wagner sleeping car, Boston to Albany, arriv- 
ing at 7.57 a. m. 
For information, maps, time-tables, tickets and accommodations in drawing-room and sleeping cars, 
apply to agents of Boston & Albany Railroad at its several stations. 

J. L. WHITE, City Pass, and Ticket Agent, or to A. S. HANSON, Gen. Pass. Agent. 

The only first-class through line from New England to tLe West. 



City Ticket Office, 366 Washington St., Boston 



LASELL LEAVES 



91 




COTRELL I LEONARD, 

ALBANY, N. Y. 

MAKERS OF 

CAPS, GOWNS and HOODS 

to the American Universities and to 
Lasell Seminary. Illustrated Man- 
ual, Samples, etc., upon application. 



PLEASE FORWARD GOODS BY 

JOHNSON & KEYES EXPRESS CO. 

AUBURNDALE AND BOSTON EXPRESS. 

Offices: 34 Court Sq., 77 Kingston, 105 Arch Streets 
BOSTON. 



WAUWINET FARM. 

COMMONWEALTH AVE. AND VALENTINE ST., 

WEST NEWTON, MASS. 
All interested in a modern Dairy are invited to visit the Farm. 



DEALER IK 



PROVISION'S. 

Comer Auburn and Lexington Streets, 

.Auburn dale, Maes. 



Established 1830 

Alfred Mudge & Son 
PRINTERS 

24 Franklin Street, Boston 

CLASS PRINTING 
A SPECIALTY 



Andrew J. Lloyd & Co. 
OIPTICIAIsTS 

©OWN-TOWN— 323 Washington St., opp. Old South Church, 

BACK BAY— 310 Bojlston St., opp. Arlington St. 

Bring your prescriptions for Eyeglasses and Spectacles to us. 
A complete line of Photographic Goods always in stock. The 
best place in Boston to have your developing and printing 
dose. Send for oar price list- 



Francis Bacheldbr. 



F. S. Snyder 



Francis Balchelder 




Beef, Pork, Mutton, Veal, Poultry, 

Game, Hams, Bacon, Lard, Butter, 

Cheese, Eggs, Cream, etc. 

Wholesale 

Provisions and Produce 



Proprietors of CAPITOL CREAMERIES, 

Central Station, rVTontpelier, Vt. 



Poultry and Egg House, 

Fenton, Michigan. 



Smoke Houses, Sausage Factory, Ham Cooking Fac- 
tory, Cold Storage, etc., 55, 57, 59, 61 and 63 
Blackstone Street, 

Boston, Mass. 



G. L. Lawrence. F. B. Eastman. 

J. P. LAWRENCE & CO., 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

Poultry, "Wild Oame. 

Goods for Shipping a Specialty. 

30 FANEUIL HALL MARKET, BOSTON. 

Telephone, Haymarket H19. 

ASPEN AVENUE, AUBURNDALE, MASS. 

FLOEIST. 

Bedding Plants, Cut Roses and Carnations a specialty. 



92 



LA SELL LEAVES 



WOODLAND PARK HOTEL 

AUBURNDALE, MASS. 

Five minutes' walk from Lasell. Open all the year. 
CHAS C. BUTLER. 

HENRY W. GOODWIN, 

75-80 Broad Street, Boston, Mass. 

BRYANT & MAY'S 

LONDON PARLOUR MATCHES- 



Preferred Stock 

MOCHA AND JAVA 

COFFEE. 

THE HIGHEST GRADE OF BLENDED COFFEE. 
BOASTED AND PACKED BY 

Martin L. Hall & Co., 

Boston, Mass. 

J, WOODWARD 

FISH, OYSTERS, EGGS, CANNED GOODS, 
VEGETABLES, ETC. 

Cov. Auburn and Ash Sts., Auburndale, Mass. 

BARLOW'S ICE CREAM. 

J. B. SANDERSON, Proprietor. 

Telephone 261-3. WEST NEWTON, MASS. 

Catering in all its branches at reasonable prices. 



BEEF, PORK, LARD, HAMS, BACON, 
PIGS' FEET and TRIPE. 



STURTEVANT & HALEY 
BEEF and SUPPLY CO. 

38 and 40 Faneuil Hall Market, 

BOSTON, MASS. 

TALLOW, STEARINS, 
FINE OLEO, OIL, SCRAP, Etc, 



CHARLES'F. HATHAWAY, 

MANUFACTURING BAKER. 



Crackers, Biscuit, Bread, Cake and Pastry. Wholesale 
jobber of Kennedy's Celebrated Crackers. Hathaway 's 
original Home-made Cream Bread, best in the world, 
kept by all leading grocers. 

Factories: 15)0ti Mass. Ave., Cambridge. 
709 Main Street, Waltham. 



G. D. Harvey. A. C. Farley. \\\ T. Farley. 

I^»rl«3y, Harvey Sc Oo. 

Importers and Jobbers of 

Dry Ooodsaj. 

141 to 149 ESSEX STREET, BOSTON. 

THIS SPACE IS PAID FOR 
BY A FRIEND. 



W. H. PBIOK. C. A. PRIOR 

PRIOR BROS. 

Successors to Wm. Prior, Jr., & Co. 
Wholesale and retail dealers in all kinds of 

Ocean, Lake and River Fisb, Oysters and Clams 

127 and 129 Faneuil Sail Market, Boston, Mass. 

Telephone, 673 Haymarket. 



XT@wt©33. lorn C@rn.paay. 

T^Th 1 sold by us Is cut from Longfellow's Pond, Wellesley 
Aw-ti • Hills. Water from pond is used in Well esley public 
service. The Newton Ice Co. is prepared to furnish a tirst 
class quality of I > OI«TI3 ICE in West Newton, Newtou- 
ville, Auburndale, Newton Lower Falls and Wellesley Hilli. 

MILLER & HATCH, Props. 

P. O. Address, Newton Lower Falls. 



A Hardware Store for a hundred years. 

Bnrditt & Williams 

Dealers in 

Builders' and General Hardware 
Supplies, Tools and Cutlery. 

20 DOCK SQ., BOSTON. 



LASELL LEAVES 



23 



^ COLLEGE 
GIRL 

Will always find at our store the LATEST 

CONCEITS IN STATIONERY as well as the other 

necessaries for her college work. 

Economical prices prevail. 



THORP & MARTIN CO. 

FINE STATIONERY SHOP. 

12 MILK STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 

Shreye, Crump & Low Co. 

147 Tremont St., Boston. 

JEWELERS and SILVERSMITHS. 



STATIONERY, CLASS and SOCIETY PINS. 

Designs submitted and estimates furnished. 



The KNICKERBOCKER SHOE 

FOR COLLEGE GIRLS. 
e. IfiL. BURT 3t CO. 

Manufacturers. 



Automobile Red. 

Enamel. 

Box Calf. 



$3.50 



French Pat. Calf. 
Wax Calf. 
Russet Calf. 



Wide Extension Edges. Heavy or Light Soles. 

Fancy Wing Tips 50c. extra. 
Extension Heels for Golf. All the latest N. Y. Styles 

BOSTON STORE, 40 WEST STREET. 



SEND TO 



SCHIRMER'S MUSIC STORE, 



(The Boston Music Company.) 



26 WEST ST., 



FOE 



BOSTON, MASS. 



Sheet Hnsic, Music Books, Strings, etc. 

Prompt and efficient service as well as advantageous 
price guaranteed. The Singer's Guide, the Piano 
Teachers' Guide, and Choir Master's Guide sent gratis 
to any address. 



Cobb, Aldrich & Co. 



Corner of Washington and Kneeland Streets, Boston* 



ALWAYS have in stock 

THE NICEST assortment of 



CRYSTALLIZED VIOLETS. 
All kinds of French Fruits, Glaces, 
Stuffed Prunes, Salted Almonds, 
Pecans and Peanuts, Violet Sachet, 
Bonbonnierres, French Bonbons, Fancy 
Chocolates, Nougatines, Marshmallow, 
Opera Caramels, etc. 



CONFECTIONS 

OF THEIR OWN MANUFACTURE 

TO BE FOUND ANYWHERE 



FANCY CRACKERS 

OF EVERY 
DESCRIPTION. 



Also a full line of Stuffed Olives, Pim-Olas, Fancy Pickles, 
Preserves and Condiments especially adapted to Dinner and Evening Parties 



CATALOGUE FORWARDED UPON APPLICATION. 



94 



LASELL LEAVES 



THE DAYLIGHT STORE 



provides every 
convenience 
for satisfac- 
tory shopping — parlor for reading, writing and resting — post office — telegraph office — safety eleva- 
tors running to basement and upper floors — every corner tliorouguly lighted and ventilated. 
While our effort is to bring an increasing number of customers each day to the various 
departments, yet our desire is to have every purchase and the detail of every transaction so 
conducted by our employees that a feeling of entire satisfaction will accompany each sale. 
Ladies' Outer Garments, Corsets, Underwear and Shoes are prominent everyday features 
of our store. ; 






WINTER AND WASHINGTON 
j STREETS, DOSTON. 



THE NEW SCALE 

HALLETT & DAVIS 
PIANOS. 

The recognized standard of the musical world. We 
have no hesitancy in saying that our Piano as made 
today is as near a perfect instrument as is possible to 
manufacture. You should try and hear the New Scale 
Hallett & Davis it you are interested in a beautiful 
toned piano. We can surprise you in price, quality 
and tone. 

Established 60 Years. 179 TREMONT STREET. 



C. W. Davidson, Pres. 
Newtonville. 



P. F. Davidson, Treas. 
Auburndale. 



THOMAS LOM COMPANY, 

77 Summer St., Boston. 

GOLDSMITHS AND SILVERSMITHS. 

3pecial designs always in stock. 
Newest ideas in Jewelry, Sterling Silver, Cut Glass, 
Umbrellas and Pocket-books. 
Repairing a specialty. 
Makers of Class and Society Pins and Golf Prizes. 

Dr. W. F. HALL, 
Dentist. 



211 Central Street, Near Station, 



Auburndale. 



HOURS FROM 8 a. m. till 5 p. m. 

Refers by permission to many patients in this city. 

All Fillings warranted. Only the best of materials used. 

Special attention given to Crown and Bridge Work. 

H. B. Thayer 

NEWEST FASHIONS IN SHOES. 

Special discount to students. 
144 TREMONT STREET, BOSTON. 







DD THINGS, 



^^ Brooches, 

|j^ Hat Pins, 

Buckles, 

Posters, 

Steins, 

Flags. 

387 Washington St., pp\TT o„ TDTTCTU 
Boston, Mass. £>ILJN 1 OX tSUorl. 



O'NEIMi'S 

6tb Aveoue 20 to 21st St., N. Y. 

lifl VlDR 

Straight Frorjt 

CORSETS. 

The Best Product of American Skill, Sur- 
passing in Wearing Qualities and Fit, and 
equalling in finish the best Imported 
Gored Corset sold in New York, and 

Fifty per cerjt. 
Cheaper 117 Price. 

They are Strictly Handmade, French 
Gored, Bias Cut and all Whalebone, and 
we guarantee every pair to give entire 
satisfaction, both as to fit and wearing 
qualities. 



FASCLL FEAVI:5 



it 



DUX FEA\inA FACTI." 



vol. xxvi 



Lasell Seminary, Auburndale, Mass., February, 1901. Number 5 



Published monthly during the School year by the Lasell Publishing Association. 



FLORENCE BREWER- 

Local Editor. 
JOANNA F. DEERING, '02. 



Editor-in-chief. 
KATHERINE E- McCOY, '01. 

Associate Editors. 
BESSIE M. DRAPER, '02. 

Subscription Agent. 
ANNIE MAE PINKHAM, '02. 



IDA M. MAI^ORY, '03 

Exchange Editor. 

LEUA A. WALKER, '01. 



Business Manager. 
ETHI^YN F. BARBER, '01. 



Asst. Business Manaser. 
JOANNA F. DEERING, '02. 



TERMS, in Advance: One copy, one year (including Postage), $1.00. Single copies, 15 cents. 







ADVERTISING RATE-S. 








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The Editors will be glad to receive from the students and Alumna any communications and items of 
interest to the school. 



Editorials. 



THE civilized world is mourning the loss 
of England's greatest queen, first, be- 
because she was a queenly queen, but above 
all because she was a womanly woman. So 
much has been written and said about Queen 
Victoria that the record of her spotless life 
is familiar to all. She has shown more 
than any other sovereign of the world that 
royalty is not inconsistent with goodness. 
Kings and Queens have not always been ex- 
amples of purity, but the Queen of Great 
Britian led a pure, simple life, and wished 
such qualities to characterize her court. Her 
moral influence upon England and upon the 
world was of the greatest value. The 



Victorian Age has been one of great pros- 
perity and advancement, but the name of 
Victoria will go down in the annals of his- 
tory, not as the Great Queen, but as the 
Good Queen. She inspired the deepest re- 
spect and affection of her subjects, for she 
always had their interests at heart. She 
disliked war, and doubtless if her power had 
been supreme, her reign would have contain- 
ed less bloodshed. To her personally, in a 
great degree, has been due the growth of the 
pleasant relations between England and the 
United States, for which we cannot be too 
thankful. While performing her royal 
duties so well the Queen never neglected her 



9 6 



LASELL LEAVES 



family. She was an affectionate wife, and 
a devoted mother, and those qualities more 
than all others make her respected and loved 
by the American people. Her home life 
was a model of devotion and love, and 
should be an example to all people. Her 
character and her position made her one of 
the most conspicuous figures of the last 
century. 

We would like to suggest that when our 
Library is re-catalogued and re-arranged, 
(which we hope will be in the near future) 
the History of Art reference books be placed 
in one of the lower shelves, instead of at the 
top where they are now. These books are 
used as much as any others in the Library, 
if not more, and there seems to be no reason 
why they should not be in a convenient 
place. 

We all extend our thanks to the Seminary 
for the large mail box which has been placed 
in the hall, near the post office, to take the 
place of the two small ones formerly used. 

— Where we cannot cure, it is our duty to 
alleviate; and how much the presence of a 
loved object tends to take from the imagina- 
tion destructive power; how it changes an 
impetuous longing to a peaceful looking. — 
Goethe. 



The Royal Mews. 



— The French schools are already in ad- 
vance of us. Girls who attend grammar 
schools in France begin at fifteen a course of 
study in manners and morals which extends 
over three years. No less distinguished 
a person than Mme. Blanc-Bentzon prepared 
the textbook for the first year's lessons upon 
duties to the family, to society, to the state, 
to self, and to God. Beginning with these 
practical talks on conduct, the study passes 
on to moral philosophy and even psychology 
as applied to ethics and education. 



DURING our short stay in London we 
wished to see all that was possible, and 
one day my friend asked me if I would like to 
go to the Royal Mews. Naturally I answered 
"Yes," for I thought that anything she 
might suggest would well be worth seeing. 
And so it was that one day while we were 
out for a long walk, we presently came to an 
imposing building. 

"Where are we?" I asked. "What is 
this?" Great was my surprise when I was 
told that we were at Buckingham Palace. 
"And where are we going?" I asked again. 
"We are going," said she, "to the Royal 
Mews. Don't you want to see them ?" 

Then for the first time I thought, "What 
is the Royal Mews?" and my surprise was 
great when I was told that it was simply the 
royal stables. You may be very certain I 
was anxious to see them, and great was my 
disappointment to learn that we could not 
gain admittance that day. The coachman, 
however, very kindly told us that by writ- 
ing to the Master of Horses for permission, 
a ticket would be sent us which would ad- 
mit a party of six. This we did, and re- 
ceiving the ticket our party of three again 
made its way to the Royal Mews. After 
we had registered, a young footman, who 
attends the queen, acted as our guide. 

Perhaps I had better tell you first of all 
that the stables are built around a square 
court. Once within, you would hardly be- 
lieve yourself to be in a stable, for it is bet- 
ter kept than many good houses. The place 
is heated, of course, and kept at a temper- 
ature of 60 degrees. In the different divi- 
sions of the stable there are from ten to 
thirty horses. And, oh, how beautifully 
they are groomed! Such magnificent 
horses, and all so gentle! I went in the 
stall beside two or three of them, and they 



LASELL LEAVES 



97 



were evidently quite accustomed to being 
petted. One of the carriage horses, chest- 
nut in color, was eighteen hands high, and 
was certainly a splendid animal. After 
this we saw the saddle horses. Among 
these I petted one that was the favorite of all 
the princes and princesses. As one goes 
on through the several parts of the stables, 
one comes now and then across a very com- 
fortable looking cat, which enjoys being 
caressed. One black cat, snugly curled up 
in the clean straw, fast asleep, the groom 
awoke for us, and made him jump over his 
foot. 

Presently, we are conducted to the rooms 
where the harness is kept. We saw that 
which was made for the Queen's Jubilee. It 
was of beautiful red leather trimmed heavily 
with gold plated mountings. The groom 
said that it was used on eight cream horses, 
whose heavy manes were matted with blue 
ribbon, so that they presented very vividly 
the three colors, red, white and blue. What 
a gorgeous sight it must have been! Those 
same cream horses we saw. How beauti- 
ful they were, and what magnificent manes 
and tails they had! Their tails almost 
touched the ground. The groom said they 
were not allowed to comb the tails of the 
horses, but could only brush the snarls out, 
and that what could not be disentangled in 
that way, must be picked out with the fin- 
gers. Since the Jubilee these horses have 
had nothing to do. When I was told that, 
I immediately wondered how these hundred 
and twenty horses, which surely were not 
all used every day, were exercised, for of 
course they must have daily exercise of some 
sort. I asked about this and was told that 
before breakfast the horses are taken in pairs 
and exercised in the stable yard. 

In another place we saw the harness used 
on the queen's horses on ordinary occasions. 
She always used plain bits as was her fancy, 



instead of those adorned with the coat of 
arms, though the rest of the harness is thus 
decorated. On ordinary occasions the 
sovereign drives four horses, but on state 
occasions, the state carriage with postillions 
is used. 

There is yet more to be seen ! Can you 
think what? The carriages. I saw the one 
that was used at the Jubilee, the one that the 
queen used ordinarily, and the one used by 
the ladies in waiting, and last but not least, 
the coronation carriage of Queen Victoria. 
It had been used nearly a hundred years 
previously, and the last occasion of its use 
was the coronation of Victoria. I sat in this 
carriage for a few moments. I wish I 
could describe the beauty of it ! Carved oak, 
heavily gilded, and the panels hand painted 
by Cipriani. 

But before we leave, I wonder if the same 
question occurs to you that occurred to me. 
If all these horses are not used often, how do 
they know how to act when suddenly they 
come out in the street amid the pomp and 
excitement of state occasions? But just 
then we came to the riding school where the 
Royal family used to take lessons, and where 
the horses are trained. Here they stand in 
a row, with flags hung above them so that 
they touch their heads, and before them are 
crowds of children waving flags, shouting, 
blowing horns, etc., and with all that, you 
see, they are pretty well prepared for "the 
duties of public life," and take the shout and 
noise without fright. 

After thanking our guide for his kind at- 
tentions, we departed, feeling pleased to 
think that we had had the pleasure and honor 
of seeing the Royal Mews. V. I. W. 



— His real meaning — "When a man as- 
serts that he is just as good as anybody else, 
do you think he really believes it?" "Cer- 
tainly not. He believes he is better." — 



98 LASELL LEAVES 

The Legend Of the Holy Grail. and as he entered he thought her eyes look- 
ed more beautiful than usual ; they seemed to 

SIR Percival, a knight of the Round have a holy light in them. He was right; 

Table, so runs the tale, a short those eyes had looked upon a wonderful and 

time before his death, was sitting under an a holy vision, and they shone still with the 

old yew-tree with his friend Ambrosius, who h g h t of it. She told him that she had seen 

was curious to know the reason for Percival's t he Holy Grail. It was in the dead of night, 

leaving the merry company of the Round when she was awa kened by beautiful, soft 

Table to share in the dull and solitary life musiCj and as she watched, a silver beam 

of the monks, for this he had done. Per- shone through her cell, and down the beam 

cival told him that it was the sweet vision of slid the Holy Grail> rosy red and brightening 

the Holy Grail which had so changed his life all the walls , throwing marvelous rosy colors 

and made him meditative and fond of soli- on them _ She told Percival that she want- 

tude. Then Ambrosius asked him what the ed him and h i s brother knights to fast and 

Holy Grail was for; he said he had often pray> s0 that they, too, could see it. Soon 

wondered, but could never find out; and now after Sir p erc ival left her, and returned to 

Percival told him all he knew about it. "It the knights. He told them what he had 

was the very cup," said he, "that our Lord heard, and as he spoke, he noticed that when 

drank from at the last supper." This cup the tale was done the eyes of Galahad 

the good Saint Joseph of Arimathea brought shon e with the same holy light that he had 

with him to Glastonbury, where it remained seen in the eyes of the nun, and when the 

for a long time. If anyone was fortunate pure> sweet maid knew of Galahad's devoted 

enough to see or touch it, he was immediately and sta inless character, she cut off all her 

healed of any hurt or disease he might have, beautiful hair and making a girdle of it, 

But after a time the people became very bound it around Galahad) telling h i m to go 

wicked, and the Holy Grail disappeared, search for the Holv Grail 

caught up to heaven, and was with men no Now in the great hall of Arthur there 



more 



stood a vacant chair, which was carved by 

The first woman of Percival's time to see Merlin< In and out among the figures on k 

the cup was a nun, and his own sister. She ran a scroll which looked like a serpent) and 

was a holy maid, and gave herself up to which formed letters that no one couM rea(L 

prayer and almsgiving, but being accused of but that meant> Merlin said> << Perilous for 

sinning against King Arthur she was put in good and m » for n0 man couM sit down in 

prison. Here she prayed more than ever this chair without losing himself. One 

before, and the old man to whom she con- night Merlin, by m i sta ke, sat down in his 

fessed, who was nearly a hundred years old, own chair and was lostj after which eyery 

often sat and talked to her of this Holy Grail. one was careful to avoid it. But Galahad 

There it was that she came to know about saicL « If t lose myse if } i save myself," and 

it, and to desire a sight of it. She was sat down in this cha i r; whereupon all the 

very anxious, indeed, to see it, and asked the knights gathered around him heard a sound 

priest whether he thought that, by much like thunder, and beheld a beam of light 

prayer and fasting, she would be able to do stream along the hall, and the Holy Grail 

so; but that he could not tell her. One pass down t h e beam. Every man stood as 

night she sent for her brother to come to her, if struc k dumb, until Percival cried out, "I 



LASELL LEAVES 



99 



make a vow that I will ride a year and a day, 
trying to find this Holy Grail which my sis- 
ter has seen." Many other knights made 
the same vow, among them Lanncelot and 
Sir Bors. Next day the monk Ambrosius, 
who did not hear King Arthur's name men- 
tioned among those of the knights who had 
taken the oath, asked what Arthur had said 
to this. Percival told him that the king was 
away on business, and was just returning 
when it happened. When he entered the 
hall, finding his knights in confusion, he 
asked Percival, who was nearest to him, what 
was the matter, and when he learned the 
truth, his face darkened and he was very 
angry, and said that if he had been there 
they would not have done it. But Percival 
said, "My King, if you had been there, you 
would have done the same thing." Then 
Arthur asked why they searched for an 
empty cloud. And Galahad answered, "I 
saw it, and I heard a voice say, 'Follow 
me !' : Then the king told them to go and 
leave him. "But," said he, "you go in vain; 
you will never find it." 

The next morning at sunrise the knights 
started out on their journey, going together 
to the gates of the city where they separated, 
each one taking his own way. When Per- 
cival started out, he was sure that he would 
soon see the Holy Grail ; but as he rode on, 
he thought to himself that he could never see 
this cup, the sight was not for him. As 
he journeyed, he became very hungry and 
thirsty, but could find nothing to eat or drink, 
for everything that he saw turned to dust at 
his approach. Finally he came to a hermit- 
age, where he told the hermit all his trou- 
bles, and was taken into the chapel and given 
food and water. There suddenly Galahad 
appeared and told Percival that he had not 
once lost sight of the cup since he had seen 
it, but that it had followed him day and 
night. He told Percival to follow him and 



he would see the vision when he was crown- 
ed king of the Spiritual city. Accordingly 
they started off together the next morning, 
but Percival was not able to follow Galahad 
very far, but he saw him move far out on 
the sea, the Holy Grail hanging over his 
head. Suddenly the heavens opened and in 
a flash he saw the Spiritual city and the 
Holy Grail, and then all the vision vanished 
and he rode back alone towards Arthur's 
gate. On his way back, however, he proved 
faithless to the holy vision, for meeting a 
lady that he had loved many years ago, he 
abode with her, forgetting his quest. But 
one night he was tormented with the thought 
of his faithlessness, and fled from the en- 
chantress, and when he returned to Arthur's 
court, he told his story to the king, saying 
that he should like to live henceforth a quiet 
life with the monks, which was granted him. 
Among the other knights Sir Bors and 
Launcelot were the only ones who had been 
fortunate enough to see the Holy Grail. Sir 
Bors had seen it face to face, but Launcelot 
could scarcely tell whether it had been a 
dream or whether he had really seen this holy 
cup. 

This is the story as told by Sir Percival 
to the monk Ambrosius only a short time be- 
fore the good knight's death. 



DON'T WORRY. 



When things go contrary, as often they do, 

And fortune seems burdened with spite, 
Don't give way to grieving all dismal and blue — 

That never set anything right ! 
But cheerfully face what the day may reveal, 

Make the best of whatever befall ; 
Since the more that you worry the worse you must 
feel, 

Why waste time in worry at all ? 

We all have our troubles, some more and some less, 

And this is the knowledge we gain — 
It's work and a brave heart that lighten the stress 

Of a life's share of sorrow and pain. 
Then face with this knowledge fate's crudest deal, 

Too plucky to faint or to fall ; 
Since the more that you worry the worse you must 
feel, 

Is it wisdom to worry at all? 

Ripley D. Saunders in St. Louis Republic. 



100 



LASELL LEAVES 



How a Rich Woman Regards a Bus- 
iness Training. 



WHEN I say that all women should have 
a business training, I mean women 
of all classes — poor, middling- rich and well- 
to-do. The assertion does not apply merely 
to those whose circumstances seem to indi- 
cate that they may one day be compelled to 
make their own way in the world. Every 
class of girl will make a better and happier 
woman if she has a business education, whe- 
ther her womanhood sees her a maid, wife, 
mother or widow. I have heard it stated 
that for a woman to get a business training 
is to crush all the poetry out of her life. This 
is sheer nonsense. A woman with a knowl- 
edge of business appreciates music, painting 
and the other finer things of life just as much 
as the woman who is ignorant of all business 
matters; and the former has the decided ad- 
vantage in that she is able to turn her knowl- 
edge of business into securing more oppor- 
tunities of seeing and appreciating these fine 
things. She can get more tickets to con- 
certs and art galleries, she will have more 
money to become the possessor of more beau- 
tiful things than a woman without business 
training, and a woman with a sure income 
before her feels a great deal more like study- 
ing poetry than a woman who is compelled 
to worry about her future bread and butter. 
I have been a business woman for fifty years, 
and am just as fond of pictures and music as 
anyone of my age. A business training is 
but one more accomplishment added to the 
list which the young woman of today is ex- 
pected to acquire, and it is absurd to say that 
its possession will interfere with the proper 
enjoyment of any of the other accomplish- 
ments. Then, every housekeeper is a busi- 
ness woman, the degree of her excellence as a 
housekeeper being the degree of the business 
training she was provided with before she 



entered upon her domestic duties. The suc- 
cessful and economical management of the 
house calls for the same kind of ability and 
judgment that is necessary to the successful 
management of a commercial enterprise. — 
Hetty Green, in Woman's Home Compan- 
ion. 



About Women. 

— Mile. Chauvin, the first woman barris- 
ter in France, will shortly make her debut 
before the fourth chamber of the civil court 
of the Seine. 

— Miss Adeline M. Jenney, of Huron, S. 
D., has won the Century Magazine prize of 
$250 for the best original story not exceed- 
ing 10,000 words. She is the daughter of 
Rev. E. W. Jenney, a Congregational minis- 
ter, and late missionary to Turkey. She 
graduated from Oberlin in 1899. Her story 
is entitled, "An Old- World Wooing." 

— Miss Ionia Ivan Roe, aged twenty-four 
years, daughter of C. C. Roe, a rich Buffalo 
man, recently took the government examina- 
tion for a steamboat pilot's license and passed 
most creditably, says the Baltimore Sun. 
She is the first woman ever granted a pilot's 
license in Virginia. Miss Roe was born in 
Belding, Mich., in 1876, and for the last six- 
teen years has been accompanying her father 
in various yachting tours. Her papers show 
that she has seen sixteen years' service at the 
wheel, and has served on three vessels. 

— Madame Berosthorn, wife of the Aus- 
trian charge d' affaires at Pekin, has been 
given the cross of the Legion of Honor for 
her heroic conduct and her assistance to the 
French during the siege of the legation. 
Only one other foreign woman has been thus 
decorated — Marie Schellenck, a Belgian wo- 
man who disguised herself as a man and 
joined Napoleon's army as a private soldier. 
She became a corporal, a sergeant, and then 
a lieutenant. She served seventeen years, 



LASELL LEAVES 



101 



went through twelve campaigns, and was 
eight times wounded. Napoleon decorated 
her personally in 1808. 

— Mrs. Mary Hatch Willard, of New 
York city, has built herself up a business that 
commends itself to dainty cooks in large 
towns. When thrown on her own resources 
and looking for something to do, a friend, 
the wife of a physician, fell seriously ill, and 
could keep no food on her stomach. This 
assumed a serious condition, when Mrs. Wil- 
lard sent her some delicacies, which worked 
like a charm and kept Mrs. Willard busy, 
while the illness lasted, in devising dishes to 
tempt a capricious appetite. The success 
was so pronounced that Mrs. Willard asked 
the physician if he would recommend her 
dishes to invalids. She soon built up a re- 
putation, and now has all that she can do. 

— Mrs. Rosalie Mauff is one of the oldest 
and most prominent business women in Den- 
ver, Col., says the Daily Times of that city. 
Seventeen years ago Mrs. Mauff had one 
small hothouse heated by a stove. Today 
she is the sole owner of the largest green- 
houses in the West. Her six greenhouses 
on Logan avenue are mostly devoted to ferns 
and palms. The cut flowers are raised in 
Harman, where there are twelve large houses 
and the only asparagus farmhouses in the 
West. Mrs. Mauff is a native of Germany, 
and a woman of rare business ability. She 
manages every detail of the business herself, 
from planting the seeds to decorating the 

churches. 

♦ » 

He. "They can photograph the voice now." 
She. "Goodness ! I hope I'll never live to see a 
picture of the things you say when your collar-but- 
ton drops down your back." 

•at m 

Said Little Johnny Green, 

This is the funniest world I ever seen ; 

A fellow is sent off to bed 

When he hain't got a bit of sleep in his head, 

And he's hustled out of it, don't you see, 

When he's just as sleepy as he can be! 

— Boston Transcript. 



What Girls Can Do. 



[KNOW a large family of sisters — eight 
of them — who used to live in the coun- 
try, years ago, when they were girls. It 
was so much in the country that servants 
were hard to get; and, as the mother was an 
invalid, the eight girls all learned to help 
with household work. It ended in each one 
taking a specialty, and learning to do it very 
well. One could iron the daintiest laces 
and ruffles; another cooked as well as an ex- 
pert; another was an excellent laundress, 
and so on. It was delightful to see what 
thorough work they made of it, and what 
real "accomplishments" these household arts 
became in their eyes. They were proud of 
doing these things well; and when they had 
servants they trained them so successfully 
that to have been in their kitchen for a year 
or two was like having a diploma. "Miss 
Eleanor H— 



- taught me how to iron," or 

"Miss Mary H showed me how to wash 

flannels," was often heard from such ser- 
vants when seeking another place, and it was 
always a recommendation in their favor. 

All of the eight sisters now, except one, 
have gone to homes of their own, and the 
old house in the country is vacant. But I 
always remember it as the place where I first 
realized, as a girl myself, what a beautiful 
thing it was to be able to do household work 
exquisitely well. I have wished a great 
many times since that I was able, as Eleanor 

H was able then, to iron some especially 

dainty bit of lace and insertion for myself, 
instead of putting it into the hands of a care- 
less ironer. But I cannot, and so I have to 
see it poorly done, and perhaps torn in the 
process. And I often have to see good food 
spoiled in the cooking because I cannot direct 

the cook myself, as Emily H would have 

done. — Priscilla Leonard. 



Envelopes were first used in 1839. 



102 



LASELL LEAVES 



A Greek Service. 



IT is seldom that one, who has not been 
abroad, has an opportunity to at- 
tend the service of a Greek church, for even 
in our largest cities, there are few represen- 
tatives of this denomination. But the last 
Sunday in January Mr. Bragdon took a 
small party into Boston to such a service. 

The place where the worship is conducted 
is a good sized room at the top of one of the 
buildings on Kneeland street. Before en- 
tering we were aware, of the odor of incense, 
and heard the intoning of the prayers, but 
were not prepafed to find all the congrega- 
tion standing, and only five or six women 
among them. The reason for this is that 
few of the women who are adherents of 
this faith come to our countrv. Near the 
door stood a colored picture representing the 
Baptism of Christ, which every one kissed 
upon entering, afterwards putting some 
small coin upon a tray close at hand. This, 
we learned, was for the purchase of a candle 
to be burned as an offering before the altar. 
To those who have no knowledge of modern 
Greek, the words of the service are, of course 
unintelligible; but it was very interesting, 
nevertheless, to watch the priest, who, gor- 
geously clothed, was performing his part of 
the ceremony. About the beginning of the 
service he presented to the people the Bible 
to kiss, in which salute the hand that held 
it was also included; and several times the 
censer was brought out and waved over the 
congregation. The service throughout was 
almost wholly intoned, the sentence, "Christ 
is risen" being particularly noticeable. Even 
the children are communicants in this church, 
and on the occasion of our visit two very 
small babies were given wine. At the end 
of the service, each person as he went out 
took a piece of bread from the hand of the 
priest. 



After having witnessed this strange mode 
of worship, we all felt desirous of visiting 
the native land of these people, so that we 
might see them in their every day life. 



The New York Lasell Club Luncheon. 



THE luncheon given this winter by the 
New York Lasell Club was an excep- 
tionally enjoyable and interesting affair. 
About thirty were present, and on this occa- 
sion Mrs. Etherington and Ella Wilson, who 
have so admirably performed their official 
duties for the club, retired to private life, 
being succeeded in office by Mrs. Geyer (Jen- 
nie Raymond) and Ada Cadmus, as presi- 
dent and vice president. Katherine Pierce 
Martin is secretary and treasurer. The 
special entertainment provided for this oc- 
casion consisted mainly of readings, by Miss 
Foster, of Boston, Mr. Victor Baillard 
(Maude Littlefield's husband) sang several 
songs. Two brides were among those 
present — Edith Howe Kip, and Laura 
Chapman Anderson. 

Following is the list of those who attend- 
ed : Anna Ampt ('98), Laura Chapman An- 
derson, Maude Littlefield Baillard, Lida Cur- 
tis Bass, Annie Brown, Ada Cadmus ('98), 
Cornelia Cushing Carpenter, Kittiebel Chap- 
man ('98), Caroline Church, Elizabeth Day, 
Grace Garland Etherington, Daisy Fischer, 
Jennie Raymond Geyer, Laura Place Gads- 
den, May Blair Goodell, Annie Gwinnell 
('88), Grace My ton Ireland, Edith Howe 
Kip ('97), Lee Lufkin, Katherine Pierce 
Martin, Sara Harvey McChesney ('91), 
Virginia Johnson Milbank, Lena Foster 
Nichols, Virginia Phoebus, Florence Ran- 
kin, Gertrude Vreeland, Susan Griggs Wil- 
son, Ella Wilson, Marie Wilson ('96). 



From a false point of view the truth it- 
self always looks false. — James Lane Allen. 



LASELL LEAVES 



103 



a v_-^— U~4-Ji- 




!■'---/ 



PERSONALS. 

— Florence Thompson, who is studying 
at the Emerson School of Oratory, made us 
a call in January, and looks well, and is im- 
proving, it seems to us, in every way. 

— Myrtle Davis Gage did right in coming 
directly to the seminary and bringing Mr. 
Gage and taking us in as partners in her new 
joys and hopes. We are very glad to be 
allowed in sympathy to enter these new lives. 
Myrtle (Mrs. DuRelle Gage) is at the Cop- 
ley Square. Lasellians in Boston ought to 
take notice. 

— The chorus teaching is taking new im- 
portance, dignity and effectiveness under 
Mr. A. E. French, a conductor and composer 
of some note in Boston. It is upon a scien- 
tific and scholarly basis that impresses itself 
upon the pupils, and they are taking hold 
with new courage after the interim of last 
year. 

— Mr. Bragdon met Abbie Congdon and 
a friend of hers, Miss Trowbridge (not our 
Ida) on the train the other day. She says 
Elizabeth Merriam is spending the winter 
in college settlement work in Boston. 

— Mrs. Leavitt, Frances' mother, is try- 
ing her hand at housekeeping. 

— Ada Cadmus' engagement to Edwin 
McCoy is announced. They are to be mar- 
ried in June, and go to housekeeping in East 
Orange. She was expecting a visit from 
Sophie Hall when she wrote. Sophie is go- 
ing to Europe soon, she says, to be gone six 
months. One of Ada's prospective sisters- 



in-law is to go with her, and another was ex- 
pected to accompany Ada and her mother on 
a trip to Jamaica, which they were to take 
this month. Mr. McCoy and his brother 
were also to be of the party. Ada is still 
busy studying violin and singing. 

— Ella Ampt Hamann ('96) writes from 
her new home in Cleveland, to express her 
pleasure in receiving the Leaves, to which 
she is a loyal subscriber, and to tell us sun- 
dry bits of interesting news. She is house- 
keeping, and says that she regrets not having 
been more attentive in cooking class while 
here. Her mother has been visiting her, 
and she was expecting Anna shortly, togeth- 
er with a cousin, the two of them having 
made various plans for a fine time while at 
Ella's. Anna has been visiting Ada Cad- 
mus ('98) who, by the way, has announced 
her engagement to an East Orange gentle- 
man, and expects to be at the Cornell Junior 
Prom. Bessie Smith Dechant has a small 
boy — new — in her home, says Ella. 

— Carita Curtis ('99) was present at 
Louise Thatcher's wedding, as was also Eliz- 
abeth Snow. Helene Little was married on 
the same day. Kittiebel was too much oc- 
cupied with Laura's wedding to attend 
Louise's. Carita is now at home helping 
keep the household wheels well oiled. 

—Elizabeth Eddy Holden ('88) writes 
that her husband has quite recovered from 
his recent illness. "We are finding," she 
says, "a pleasant home here in Dorchester, 
and are very happy in our work." 

— Grace Garland Etherington says that 
she has thoroughly enjoyed the work for the 
Lasell Club of New York, during the three 
years of her presidency. Tier successor is 
Jennie Raymond Geyer. 

— Through the courtesy of Lieut. Ranlett, 
the officers of the Lasell Battalion enjoyed 
the pleasure of an exhibition of bouts with 
duelling sword, bayonet, sabre and foils, 



104 



LASELL LEAVES 



given at the Posse Gymnasium, Boston, on 
the 7th of February. 

— Jessie Gaskill ('93) is well once more, 
and at home. Mollie Lathrop, she tells us, 
is engaged to a young gentleman, who is a 
friend of Jessie's. We quote from her let- 
ter : "I met last summer at Naples, Me., a 
Mrs. Garland, from Saco, at Lasell in 1883, 
and at Bethlehem Effie Prickett was stop- 
ping at the same hotel. Grace Johnson was 
there also. She visited me in the early win- 
ter, and was quite enthusiastic over Sunday 
school kindergarten work. She's a real 
worker, always busy." 

— Julia Aldrich Williams sends Leaves 
subscription. She is housekeeping, and 
thinks her Lasell training stands her in good 
stead in this line, and has conceived a real 
affection for Mrs. Lincoln's book. "We 
have lost Mr. and Mrs. Whitney (Mary 
Johnson, '98) as neighbors," she writes; 
"they have given up their flat and are board- 
ing. Mrs. Whitney expects to make a home 
visit in the spring." Nora Burroughs 
('97) visited Julia recently. She is quite 
well again. Alice Kendall ('99) lives so 
near St. Louis that Julia sees her every now 
and then, and she "counts in" with the Lasell 
girls of the city. 

— Grace Allen's letter tells of an October 
visit to Chicago and another in December to 
Denver. In the former city she saw Emma 
Goll Dacy ('98) and Jess Hutchinson, and 
visited Julia Hammond in the latter, whither 
she went, she and Elizabeth, to act as brides- 
maids at Ruth Cleaveland's wedding; she 
saw Gertrude Bucknum and Clara Heath. 
Eva Kennard Wallace is housekeeping in 
northern England. She has a baby boy a 
few weeks old. Lil Tukey Morrison spent 
the holidays with her parents in Omaha. 
Marie McDonald lately met with an acci- 
dent, while coming home from a visit to Ella 
Eddy. She was thrown from a carriage 



and her ankle broken. Mae Burr and Mar- 
tha Stone Adams are both well and enjoying 
life. Grace gives us a list of engagements 
unusually long for one letter; her own, to 
begin with, to Llenry Tefft Clarke, of Oma- 
ha; Mabel Taylor ('95) to Herbert Gannett; 
Julia Hammond to George Joseph McBride, 
of Chicago; Elizabeth Stephenson ('95) to 
J. Earl Morgan, of Oshkosh, Wisconsin, and 
Helen Medsker ('94) to Dr. Humphreysville, 
of St. Joseph. Grace's engagement was an- 
nounced, she says, at a buffet luncheon given 
by her mother in honor of Ruth Cleaveland 
Bates and her husband, on their return wed- 
ding trip, during which they visited at 
Grace's for a few days. 

— Gertrude Taggart ('97) thinks a Middle 
West Lasell Club would be a good thing, the 
club to include girls of Illinois, Ohio, and In- 
diana. She tells us of the death of Bess 
Bailey's brother — a sad blow to the family. 

— Annie Clark Butterworth and her fam- 
ily are living now at Marion, Indiana. They 
have three bright, happy children, two little 
girls, who have just entered school, and a 
little four-year-old mannie, "every inch a 
boy." 

— Jessie McCarthy ('00) gave a Lasell 
luncheon, January 1 8th, for Florence Wilbur, 
then her guest. There were present eight 
Lasell girls : Gertrude Moore, Helen Har- 
ris, Jeanette Knights, Ethel Cornell, Eliza- 
beth Hitchcock, Jennie Maxwell, Flos, and 
Jessie. Needless to say that that luncheon 
was not eaten in silence. 

— Blanche Goll has been visiting Marietta 
Sisson ('99), and Kittiebel Chapman ('98). 
Blanche lives in New York now — 134 West 
93d St. She intends going abroad in the 
spring. 

— From Martha Baker ('98), now at 
home in Bowden, Ja., we hear that her 
mother is improving so much that the family 
feel greatly encouraged about her. Martha 



LASELL LEAVES 105 

speaks of coming to Boston again next sum- opposite house were able to reach and rescue 

mer. her, and afterwards Mr. Nason was also 

— Edith Allen ('99) says that Emily Bis- saved. The shock, however, was too much 

sell ('99) visited Frances Wood in Decern- for him in his weakened condition, and he 

ber, at which time Edith attended a whist died on Saturday morning. Florence, who 

party given by Frances, who, by the way, had begun to rally, seemed now to have had 

expected to start off on a round of visits this her every tie to life severed, and lived only a 

month, Emily and Elsie Burdick ('99) being day longer, dying on Monday. Her bro- 

among the favored ones. Edith's new ad- ther Harry was with them at the time, and 

dress is 79 Williams street, Worcester, Mass. brought the remains on to Newton. Flor- 

Helen Campbell, she informs us, is at St. ence's mother was seriously ill at the time, 

Andrew's Bay, Florida, for the winter; and and it was feared that the news might prove 

Mabel Currie's engagement to Mr. E. Hill, disastrous to her, so that it was kept from 

Jr., is announced. The '99 class letter has her for a time. The one thought that 

been the rounds, and Edith started it on its sweetens and brightens all this sad story is 

second trip early in December. that Florence and her husband were both 

— Ella Wilson ('96) to whom we are in- such sunny and helpful people that their 

debted for news of the New York Lasell spirit of kindliness and of loving interest in 

club luncheon, tells us that Winifred Conlin others made itself felt wherever they went, 

Cooke has lost her husband. They were and they came as a blessing into all the lives 

south when he died, after only a four day's that they touched. Could one wish to leave 

illness. a more shining record? 

— Some one has kindly sent us a clipping — Of herself and family Eva says that 

concerning the recent wedding of Florence they are well. She is assisting her father in 

Harding and Mr. Harry Emmons. Ac- the bookkeeping and correspondence, like 

cording to this she had a very pretty wed- the good daughter that she is. 

ding. — Louise Hubbard ('96) has been receiv- 

— From Eva Couch ('93) we learn the ing high praise for her talents as a reader, 

sad news of the death of Florence Williams She took part recently in a benefit entertain- 

Nason and her husband. They had been ment at Jamestown, N. Y., and here showed 

living in New York for some time, about a the fine results of that training to which she 

year, which sums up the duration of their has devoted her energies so assiduously for 

married life. Florence's baby lived but a the last few years — two, we think — and, as a 

few hours, and Florence herself almost fol- consequence, the papers are sounding her 

lowed the little one, but through skilful praises. 

treatment was slowly recovering, when on — Clifford Dasher Stevens ('98) is the 

Wednesday, the 30th, the hotel in which proud possessor of a small boy, not long a 

they were living burned, the guests barely resident of this country, and known by the 

escaping with their lives. Mr. Nason was family as Hugh. She is authority for the 

ill with grippe, and the part of the building statement that Alvena Chase is in Sandusky, 

where they were was cut off by the fire from doing club work, which she much enjoys, and 

ordinary means of escape. Florence was that Alice West is in Altadena, trying her 

swung by a rope from the hotel window, hand at housekeeping. Clifford adds her 

after several vain attempts, till those in an name to our subscription list. Has her ad- 



io6 



LASELL LEAVES 



dress been given in the Leaves? It is no 
Thirty-Fifth St., E., Savannah. 

— Mrs. Stuckenberg, the much esteemed 
wife of the former much esteemed pastor of 
the American Church in Berlin, to whom 
more than to any other one is due the large 
collection in this country of money for the 
building of the fine church there for the 
American Colony, in connection with a let- 
ter about that enterprise (which, by the way, 
is reviving, a lot has been purchased, and the 
successor of Dr. Stuckenberg is in this coun- 
try soliciting funds) writes: 

"What wise attractive plans you make for 
Lasell ! I was delighted with the outline of 
your scientific housekeeping. It lies at the 
basis of good home-making. Will not the 
time soon come when school attention will 
be shown to preparation for home govern- 
ment and direction in all of the relations wo- 
men may or must occupy? In Germany 
there is more instruction along these lines 
than is manifest here. The mothers are 
prepared for giving it in the best families." 

— Alice M. Ashley ('99) leaves Chicago 
February 25 for San Francisco, expecting 
there to take a steamer for Honolulu. She 
is going with her father and mother, and 
expects to be away about six weeks. 

— Alice Taylor Potter is now living in 
Newton Centre, 65 Oxford Road. She has 
a pleasant little home there. On Monday, 
February 4, Edith Dustin, Ruth Talcott and 
Mabel Martin spent the day with her. 

— Myrtle Davis hasn't had a very pleas- 
ant time for her honeymoon, her husband 
having suffered with a sore throat until now. 
We saw them at the Senior entertainment 
on Saturday evening, and he was better. 

Mr. Bragdon very much regrets missing, 
on Jan. 26, the call of Joseph G. Ebersole, 
manager of the Smith & Nixon Piano Manu- 
facturing Co., at Cincinnati and Chicago, 
the brother of our Caralyn Ebersole Martin 



and Mary Ebersole Crawford. By no 
means would Mr. Bragdon have allowed 
anything to interfere if he had known of the 
call, of which he was not aware until after 
Mr. Ebersole had gone. 

— I met Mary Marshall Call and her hus- 
band, brother of Miss Call, on the train the 
other day. They had been attending the 
funeral of the mother, Mrs. Whiston. Mary 
doesn't seem to have changed a particle in 
the last five years. Both looked and acted 
like happy and prosperous people, and Mary 
says her eldest is almost up to her shoulder. 

■ ■ ' ■ - ^ ^ • ^^ ■ ■ ■ — — — — - - 

Who is for Washington? 

If any former Lasell pupils and members 
of their families want to join the Easter 
Washington party, leaving Boston Wednes- 
day, April 3, and returning Wednesday, 
April 10, at an inclusive cost of $40, Mr. 
Bragdon would be pleased to have the 
names. Those who understand anything 
about Lasell parties, know that when we say 
"$40 inclusive," that means there are no ex- 
tras at all, and that we go to good hotels and 
do things in first class shape, and take excel- 
lent care of our parties. Owing to Mr. 
Shepherd's western trip, he ought to know 
about this a little earlier than usual. 

C. C. B. 

m ♦ 

— No man of conscience can do easily and 
instinctively that which he knows he cannot 
do well. The worker must have therefore 
the serenity that comes from confidence in 
the adequacy of his preparation. A man 
can even fail with a clear conscience if he has 
taken every precaution against the possibility 
of failure. — Outlook. 

♦ m 
A life spent with a purpose grand 

Has simply not been "spent" ; 
It's really an investment, and 
Will yield a large per cent. 
If you are bald, don't get the blues, 

You're not beyond repair ; 

Just ask your doctor for advice, 

His bill will raise your hair. 



LASELL LEAVES 



107 








On the evening of January 24, the mem- 
bers of Charles Ward Post 62, G. A. R., 
were entertained by the Lasell battalion. 
After watching the amusing drill given by 
the veterans, each soldier led two girls down 
to the dining-room, where a delicious supper 
Avas served. The toasts were bright and in- 
teresting, and the old war songs filled us with 
the spirit of '62. Later, the men left with 
three rousing cheers for Lasell, and a very 
cordial invitation to the girls to visit the 
Post at some future time, which we hope will 
not be far distant. 

January 31, was observed here as Day of 

Prayer, the program being as follows : 

10.30 Morning Service. 

Sermon: Rev. George H. Spencer, 

Newton Centre, Mass. 
Afternoon Service. 
Under the direction of the Christian 
Endeavor Society. 
Evening Service. 

Sermon : Rev. Ozora S. Davis, 
Newtonville, Mass. 

It was a beautiful day, and it is certain that 

there were few of the girls who did not feel 



430. 



7-30. 



the earnest spirit that characterized it. It 
would be well, if, instead of having only one 
such day in the year, there were more of 
them to help us in our trying to lead Chris- 
tian lives. 

February 4. Those of us who were lucky 
enough to have tickets, enjoyed a great treat 
at the Sembrick afternoon concert. With 
no apparent effort, she filled the entire hall 
with the sweet tones of her powerful voice. 
Each selection seemed more beautiful than 
the last, and when the program was finished, 
the audience refused to be satisfied until she 
responded with an encore, the accompani- 
ment of which she herself played. 

On the evening of February 7th, the offi- 
cers of the drill, and members of Company 
C, attended a fencing exhibition and 
tournament at the Posse Gymnasium, given 
by the pupils of Charles A. Ranlett, Master 
of Sword, Posse Gymnasium, and those of 
Captain A. William Seaholm, instructor in 
the Roxbury Latin School. Being very 
much interested in exhibitions of this sort, 
we were glad of the opportunity of seeing the 
work of both professionals, and amateurs. 
The score was five to four in favor of the 
Posse Gymnasium. Lieut. Ranlett, while at 
West Point, was champion fencer, and was 
named with another cadet to fence, in exhi- 
bitions given before the Congressional Board 
of Visitors and the General commanding the 
United States Army in 1895. For quick- 
ness in movement and in sight, he can scarce- 
ly be equalled. We shall take an added in- 
terest in our drill after this, and try to attain 
more skill in this very graceful exercise. 

Mr. Amos R. Wells gave a very interest- 
ing talk to the Christian Endeavor Society 
on the evening of January 20th. He spoke 
of the way in which many people perform 
their religious duties, often just to get them 
off their hands, and he gave by way of illus- 
tration an anecdote of a child, who, hearing 



io8 



LASELL LEAVES 



his mother exclaim in the midst of her house- 
work that there was "so much to do," later 
in the day was discovered by her on his knees 
in a corner. "Why, my dear," said she, 
"what are you doing?" The little fellow 
replied, "I des fought I would say my 
prayers and det dat out of de way." The 
lesson to be derived is obvious. Mr. Wells 
emphasized the privilege and the duty of liv- 
ing Christian lives, glad and hopeful in char- 
acter, rather than dull or gloomy. 

Saturday evening, February 2, a small 
party of our students attended a reading giv- 
en at Newtonville by the Rev. Henry Van- 
Dyke, Professor of English in Princeton 
University. His first selection was from 
"Fisherman's Luck," and was followed by 
portions of other stories, and a number of 
short poems of his own composition. All 
who heard him felt fully repaid for going, by 
the excellence of the performance. Dr. Van- 
Dyke possesses a fine voice, a pleasing man- 
ner, and a rare sense of humor. Some were 
so well pleased with this reading that they 
went to hear the reader preach in the Chapel 
at Wellesley on the following Sunday morn- 
ing. Here they heard a most excellent ser- 
mon, the theme of which was, "The Uniting 
of the Real and the Ideal in Life." "We 
must provide for both the spiritual and the 
physical man in life," said he, "but must not 
carry the thought of, or the provision of 
either to extremes. We should all realize 
the ideal, and idealize the real, in our lives, 
more than we do." Certainly these thoughts 
are worth remembering and living up to 
every day. 

— On Monday evening, February 11, a 
woman suffrage meeting was held at the 
Seminary by the Newton Woman Suffrage 
League, on which occasion Miss Sara Cone 
Bryant, of Melrose, and Mrs. Maud Wood 
Park, president of the College League, ad- 
dressed the girls on the subject of woman 



suffrage. There was music by Mrs. Nelson 
Freeman. The addresses were bright, in- 
teresting, and logical. 

m ■* 

RECITAL OF SACRED SONG 

by 

Mrs. May Sleeper Ruggles. 

There is an Hour of Hallowed Peace, Cheney 

Rock of Ages. Hark, My Soul ! It is the Lord, 

Gounod 

Angels Bright and Angels Fair, Boex 

One Sweetly Solemn Thought, Ambroise 

There is a Blessed Home, Rotoli 

Ave Maria, Mascagni 

Virgin's Cradle Song, Bartlett 

Lasell Seminary, Feb. 10, igoi. 

«■ ♦ 

New Girls. 

Falk, Bella, Boise, Idaho. 
French, Mabel, New York, N. Y. 
Hayden, Bertha, East Hartford, Conn. 
Hawley, Edith, Albany, N. Y. 
Robinson, Belle, Newport, Vt. (Day 
pupil.) 

.0 o 

Anecdotes About Children. 

— A little four-year-old occupied an upper 
berth in the sleeping-car. Awakening once 
in the middle of the night, his mother asked 
him if he knew where he was. "Tourse I 
do," he replied, "I'm in the top drawer." 

— A prominent scientist was telling the 
story of Pandora's box to his little son. He 
was telling it with all possible dramatic ef- 
fect. "And she slowly lifted that lid and 
peeped within; and then what do you think 
came out?" "Germs!" cried his little son, 
promptly. 

— Little four-year-old Harry was not feel- 
ing well, and his father suggested that he 
might be taking the chicken pox, then preva- 
lent. Harry went to bed laughing at the 
idea, but early next morning he came down 
stairs looking very serious, and said, "You're 
right, papa, it is the chicken pox. I found 
a feather in the bed." 

— Little Tommy and his younger sister 
were going to bed without a light. They 



LASELL LEAVES 



109 



had just reached the bottom of the stairs, 
when Tommy, after vainly endeavoring to 
pierce the darkness, turned round and said : 

"Ma, is it polite for a gentleman to pre- 
cede a lady when they have to walk in single 
file?" 

"No, my son," replied the mother, "the 
lady should always take the lead." 

"I thought so," said Tommy delightedly; 
"go ahead, Sue!" — Primary Education. 

— I wonder if the majority of people real- 
ize the full necessity of meeting obligations 
to friends. Those of us who gladly break 
our costly boxes, giving our all in some su- 
preme moment of adoration, may be great 
sinners when we meet the small demands of 
friendship. Do we comprehend the need 
of the steady purpose to show the one for 
whom we have a real regard that she is not 
forgotten ? — Anon. 

«i m 

SUBSCRIBE NOW. 

Now is the time to send in your sub- 
scription to the Leaves, girls. You all enjoy 
the items about the girls you knew here, and 
should not deprive yourself of this bond of 
union with your old friends and your school 
home. If you have any news of yourself, or 
of any of the girls, let us have it for our 
"Personals." We thank those who have 
already done this. 

— We can be thankful to a friend for a 
few acres or a little money; and yet for the 
freedom and command of the whole earth, 
and for the great benefits of our being, our 
life, health, and reason, we look upon our- 
selves as under no obligation. — Seneca. 



— Not every cloud that appears on the 
horizon developes into a storm. — The Rev. 
Allan Krichbaum. 



THE RINGER OF THE CHIMES. 

He had never 'heard the music, 

Though every day it swept 
Out over the sea and the city, 

And in lingering echoes crept. 
He knew not how many sorrows 

Were cheered toy that evening strain, 
And how often men paused to listen, 

When they heard that sweet refrain. 

He only knew his duty, 

And he did it with patient care, 
But he could not hear the music 

That flooded the quiet air; 
Only the jar and the clamor 

Fell harshly on his ear, 
And he missed the mellow chiming 

That every one else could hear. 

So we, from our quiet watch-tower, 

May be sending a sweet refrain, 
And gladdening the lives of the lowly, 

Though we hear not a single strain. 
Our work may seem but a discord, 

Though we do the best we can, 
But others will hear the music 

If we carry out God's plan. 

M. E. Paul!, 



— Knavery is supple, and can bend; but 
honesty is firm and upright, and yields not. — 
Colton. 



Any Other Questions? 

The lecturer on health had finished his dis- 
course and invited his auditors to ask any 
question they chose concerning points that 
might seem to need clearing up, when a lean, 
skinny man asked : 

"Professor, what do you do when you 
can't sleep at night?" 

"I usually stay awake, although of course 
everybody should feel at liberty to do other- 
wise. Are there any other questions?" — 
The King. 

o m 

A Word to Lasell Shoppers. 

The importance of trading with the firms 
who advertise in the Lasell Leaves can- 
not be overestimated. We should not ex- 
pect their patronage if we do not give them 
our support in return. Another way for 
Lasell girls to be loyal ! 



no 



LASELL LEAVES 



mother. She died of pneumonia, on the 
ioth of February. 



PASSED AWAY. 

Rarely, indeed, has it happened that death 
invades the circle of those who year by year 
are gathered together within Lasell's walls, 
but this year it has done so, and we miss from 
hall and classroom one of the sweetest tem- 
pered and best loved among our girls, Alice 
Bingham, who died at her home in Waltham 
a short time after the re-opening of school. 
A number of her schoolmates attended with 
Mr. Bragdon her funeral services. We feel 
deeply her untimely death, and sympathize 
with her afflicted family. 

Early in February occurred the death of 
Florence Williams Nason and her husband, 
within a day of each other, and under es- 
pecially distressing circumstances, detailed 
elsewhere in this issue. We crave for the 
bereaved families the comfort of the Great 
Healer of all life's ills. 

Just as we go to press we hear with sor- ste er the Ship of State through a Presiden- 
row of the death of Josephine Chandler's tial campaign or a Chinese complication. 



Home Makers. 

One of the greatest social dangers today 
is the indiscriminate employment of 
married women and minors. 

In ten years the number of employed min- 
ors increased two hundred and thirty-eight 
per cent., and the number of employed mar- 
ried women five-fold, or three-fold more than 
single women. By earning pin money from 
choice, too many become bread winners from 
necessity. 

Every principal and every woman's club 
should denounce the pernicious doctrine that 
girls must become self-supporting before 
they have finished the ward school. The 
hands, the heads, and the hearts of our girls 
should be trained for home making. It re- 
quires more mental, moral, and spiritual acu- 
men to conduct a good home than it does to 



Business Established 1817. 




PRAY & SONS GO. 



Wholesale and retail dealers in 



CARPETS ^^t3d 

of both Foreign and Domestic Manufacture; also 



Curtains, Draperies, Portieres 



u 



and all 

descriptions 

of choice 



Upholstery Fabrics 



B^-PRICES ALWAYS MODERATE.^ 



JOHIT DEI. IFIR-A-IT & SOIsTS CO., 

Oldest and JLarg-est Carpet House in l¥ew England. 

PRAY BUILDING, Opposite Boylston St. 

6 5 8 WASHINGTON STREET, BOSTON, 6 5 8 



LASELL LEAVES 



in 




quet, The College Rambler, The Polymnian, 
The Pennant, The Classic, The University 
Beacon, The Cresset, The Polytechnic, The 
Kalends and Acta Victoriana. 



The January number of the Academia 
contains an article worth reading : "What 
Is a Great Man?" 

The last number of the Adelphian was an 
interesting number, taking on the form of a 
review of the latest books. 

Dartmouth College was the first to issue 
a college paper, and has the honor of having 
had Daniel Webster as editor-in-chief. — Ex. 

Exchanges received last month are : The 
Bowdoin Quill, The Mount Holyoke, High 
School Gleaner, Nesinns College Bulletin, 
The Nezvton High School Review, The Rac- 



The following have been favored with 
calls from members of their family : Misses 
George DeGroff Clokey, White, Walker, 
Curtis, J. Lapowski, Rogers, Armstrong, A. 
Smith, Brewer, Crosby, Shields, Whitney, 

M. Harris, Dwinell. 

• * 

Former pupils : Florence Thompson, 
Emma Ferris, Grace E. Graffarn, Nettie 
Woodbury, Roxie Green, Marion Safford, 
Carol Maude Case ('99), Grace Washburn 
('97)- m 

— I have thought how careful one ought 
to be, to be kind and thoughtful to one's old 
friends. It is so soon too late to be good to 
them, and then one is always so sorry. — 
Sarah Ome Jewett. 



THE BEST IS NONE TOO GOOD 



FOR A LASELL GIRL. 




WE have been chosen to make, for MEMBERS OF THE CLASS OF 1901, the BEST 
and MOST ARTISTIC PHOTOGRAPHS they have ever had. 
Members of other classes will be given a VERY LOW SCHOOL RATE upon our 
HIGH ART PRODUCTIONS. 

21 WEST STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 



112 



LASELL LEAVES 



! 



Foot Anatomy. 

Is a branch of science that the skilled shoe 
maker has to thoroughly master. The 
makers of 




have, after years of experience, acquired a 
knowledge enabling them to produce shoes 
that have a snug, glove-like fit at the heel, 
ankle and instep, seldom found even in the 
finest custom-made shoes, and they reveal a 
style and individuality of their own which all 
good dressers appreciate. 

(Forty styles in all Leathers.) 
Always g|3 50 Talr. 



Shepard, Norwell & Co., 

Winter Street, Boston. 



OPTICIANS. 

MANUFACTURERS of Spectacles and Eye Glasses, and Im- 
porters of Opera, Field and Marine Glasses and Optical 
Goods of every description. Oculists' prescription work a 
specialty. 

165 Tremont Street, Boston. 

FIRST NATIONAL, BANK 

OF WEST NEWTON, MASS. 

James H. Nickerson, Pres. A. R. Mitchell, "Vice-Pres. 

Edward P. Hatch, Cashier. 

General Banking, Collection and Exchange. 
Capital, $100,000. 

-- Business hours daily, 8.30 to 12 a. m. and 1 to 3 p.m. 
Saturdays, 8.30 a. m. to 12 m. Safe deposit boxes to rent in 
new fire and burglar proof vault. 

ELLIOT W. KEYES 

TAYLOR BLOCK AUBURNDALE. 

Apothecary. 

Drugs, Medicines and Toilet Articles. 
California Perfumes. Confections. 



Rockweul. and Churchill.. 



PRINTER8 

THIRTY-NINE ARCH STREET, 
BOSTON, MASS. 



SCHOOL ANNUALS, 
ANNOUNCEMENTS, 
CATALOGUES. 



PRINTERS OF LABELL CATALOGUE. 



C. F. Hovey & Co. 

33 Summer Street. 
42 Avon Street. 




Importers of 

Dress Goods, Silks, 
Cloaks, Suits, Laces, 

Underwear, Small Wares. 

Roses, 

Carnations, 

Violets, 

Daffodils, 

Forget-me-not, 

Lily ofthe Valley 

Auburndale, Mass. 
Telephone. 

Mrs. C. H. HALL, 

DRESSMAKER. 

Work done at reasonable prices. 

Special rates to students. 

490 AUBURN STREET, AUBURNDALE. 

C. RAYMOND di LUC CI, 

CHOICE FRUITS, CANDY, NUTS, ETC. 

CIGARS andVTOBACCO. 

365 AVBVMN STREET, corner ASS STRJEB1 

AUBTrjRNDALE, MASS. 



MUTTON, LAMB, VEAL, 

POULTRY and GAME 

WHOLE SALE AND RE TAIL. 

Stalls 13 and 15, Faneuil Hall Market, Boston. 

Telephone connection. 

George W. Kimball & Co., 

Wholesale and retail dealers In 

Poultry, Game, Beef, Mutton, Lamb and Yeal. 

Basement, No. 32a North Street, opposite Merchants' 
Row, Boston. 

Telephone 927 Haymarket. 
Howard M. Smith. Albert P. Smith. 

SMITH BROTHERS. 

(Successors to Geo. H. Phil brook & Co.) 

Butter, Cheese, Eg^g-s 

Stalls No. 2 and 4, 
Faneuil Hall Market, Boston, Mass. 

Telephone, Haymarket 884. 



LASELL LEAVES 



113 




Ladies' Shirt and Golf Waists, 
$5.00 to $20.00. 

From Madras, Oxfords, Cheviot, French 
Percales, English and French Flannels, 
Silk and Moire Poplin. 



Blanket Wraps 

For the Nursery. 
For the Sick Room. 
For the Bath. 

For Steamer Traveling. 
For the Railway Carriage. 
For Yachting. 
For Men, Women, Children and the 
Baby, $2.75 to $35, with Hood and 
Girdle complete. 



A Special Department for 

Ladies' Golf Waists, 
Bicycle and Golf Skirts, 
Entire Golfing Suits. 

GOLF CLUBS, 
GOLF BALLS and 
CADDY BAGS. 




NOYES BROS. 

Washington and Summer Streets, 

BOSTON, Mass., U. S. A. 



You should call or send for sample of 

King's Royal Bond. 



Most bond papers as good sell for about double the 

price of this. 

Per Quire Five Quires 

24 Sheets, ) -^ ,- ~ 120 Sheets, > <t 1 



25 Envelopes 



,l2$C 



100 Envelopes, 



This comes in three colors — white, azure and ceru- 
lean blue — and in the very latest fashionable sizes. 

Clan D l/!n/v Art Stationer and Engraver. 

UltJUi Di iXingj 250 Boylston St., Boston, Mass. 

Calling Cards and Die Stamping a specialty. 



SHOES FOB 
YOUNG LADIES. 

Newest Shapes. Newest Styles for Gym- 
nasium, Tennis, Walking and Dress. 

WE GIVE TEN FEB CENT. DISCOUNT 
TO AED IASELL STUDENTS. 

THE HENRY H. 
TUTTLE CO., 

Cor. WASHINGTON and WINTER STS., 
BOSTON. 



DAVIS, CHPAIN CO. 

J. A. BARKER, President. 

Commission Merchants and Wholesale 
Dealers in Foreign and Domestio 

Fruits and Produce. 

83 and 85 Faneuil Hall Market, 

Cellar 15 South Side, 

Boston, Mass. 

Telephone Haymarket 777. 



MILLS & DEERING, 

Receivers and Dealers in Fine Grades of 

BUTTER 

AND STRICTLY FRESH EGGS. 

CHAS. W. HICCINS, 

Choice Family Groceries. 

Teas, Coffees, Spices, Canned Goods, Fancy 
Crackers, Fruit, Nuts and Confections. 

Davis Block, 417 Auburn St., Aubumdale. 



ii4 



I"! 



LASELL LEAVES 



JOSHUA THORNDIKE. 



CHAS. W. SPEAK 



JOSHUA THORNDIKE & CO. 



DEALERS IN 



MUTTON, LAMB and VEAL 

Stalls 3 and 5 New Faneuil Hall Market, 
BOSTON, MASS. 

Edward E. Babb & Co. 

25 Arch St., Boston, Mass. 

Dealers in 

SCHOOL BOOKS and SCHOOL SUPPLIES 

D. A. HOWE 

273 MAIN STREET, WORCESTER, MASS. 

WHOLESALE GROCER. 

Gallons Canned Goods of all kinds and of the best 
quality a specialty. Teas and Coffees. 



Dr. GEORGE A. BATES, 

TAYLOR BLOCK, AUBUJRNDALE. 

DENTIST. 

Office hours. — Mondays, Wednesdays, Thursdays 
and Saturdays, 8 a. m. to 4 p. m. 



COTRELL I LEONARD, 

ALBANY, N. Y. 

MAKERS OF 

CAPS, GOWNS and HOODS 

to the American Universities and to 
Lasell Seminary. Illustrated Man 
ual, Samples, etc., upon application 







UaVdissfcl. 



*\ 






m 



7R0O& MAftK . 



FINEST ROAD-BED ON THE CONTINENT. 



Boston and Albany Railroad. 

THROUGH CAR SERVICE IN EFFECT SEPTEMBER 20, 1900. 



No. 7 — Leaves Boston at 8.30 a. m. except Sunday. Wagner buffet drawing-room car, Boston to Albany. 
No. 15 — Leaves Boston at 10.45 a. m. daily. Wagner vestibuled buffet library-smokiing car and vestibuled 

sleeping cars. Boston to Chicago, via L. S. & M. S. R. R. to St. Loui's via Big Four 

Route. Dining car service. 
No. 19 — Leaves Boston at 2.00 p. m. daily. The North Shore Special Wagner buffet vestibuled sleeping 

cars, Boston to Cleveland and Chicago. ) 

No. 23 — Leaves Boston at 3.30 p. m. except Sunday. Wagner buffet vestibuled 'sleeping cars, Boston to 

Niagara Falls. Tourist sleeping car Boston to Chicago. 
No. 37 — Leaves Boston at 6.00 p. m. daily. Wagner vestibuled sleeping oar, Boston to Cleveland and 

Cincinnati via L. S. & M. S. R. R. ; also Wagner vestibuled sleeping Car, Boston to Detroit 

and Chicago via M. C. R. R. 
No. 63 — Leaves Boston at 11.00 p. m., except Saturday. Wagner sleeping car, Boston to Albany, arriv- 
ing at 7.57 a. m. 
For information, maps, time-tables, tickets and accommodations in drawing-room and sleeping cars, 
apply to agents of Boston & Albany Railroad at its several stations. 

J. L. WHITE, City Pass, and Ticket Agent, or to A. S. HANSON, Gen. Pass. Agent. 

The only first-class through line from New England to the "West. 



City Ticket Office, 366 Washington St., Boston 



LASELL LEAVES 



115 




BONBON5 

CHOCOLATES 

Delicious Ice Cre&rr? Soda. 

45 TREMONT STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 

PLEASE FORWARD GOODS BY 

JOHNSON & KEYES EXPRESS CO. 

AUBURNDALE AND BOSTON EXPRESS. 

Offices: 34 Court Sq., 77 Kingston, 105 Arch Streets 
BOSTON. 

WAUWINET FARM. 

COMMONWEALTH AVE. AND VALENTINE ST., 

WEST NEWTON, MASS. 
AH interested in a modern Dairy are invited to visit the Farm. 



DEALER IN 

Corner Auburn and Lexington Streets, 

_Auburndale, Mass. 



Established 1830 

Alfred Mudge & Son 
PRINTERS 

24 Franklin Street, Boston 
CLASS PRINTING 

A SPECIALTY 



.Andrew «T. Lloyd & Co. 
OFTICIA.N8 

DOWN-TOWN— 323 Washington St., opp. Old South Church. 

BACK BAI-310 Boylston St., opp. Arlington St. 

Bring your prescriptions for Eyeglasses and Spectacles to us. 
A complete line of Photographic Goods always in stock. The 
beet place in Boston to nave your developing and printing 
done. 8end for our price list. 



Francis Bachelder. 



F. S. Snyder 



Francis Batchelder 
& Co. 



Beef, Pork, Mutton, Veal, Poultry, 

Game, Hams, Bacon, Lard, Butter, 

Cheese, Eggs, Cream, etc. 



Provisions and Produce 



Proprietors of CAPITOL CREAMERIES, 

Central Station, BVBontpelfer, Vt. 



Poultry and Egg House, 

Fenton, Michigan. 



Smoke Houses, Sausage Factory, Ham Cooking Fac- 
tory, Cold Storage, etc., 55, 57, 59, 61 and 63 
Blackstone Street, 

Boston, Mass. 



G. L. Lawrence. f. B. Eastman. 

J. P. LAWRENCE & CO., 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

Poultry, Wild Game. 

Goods for Shipping a Specialty. 

30 FANEUIL HALL MARKET, BOSTON. 

Telephone, Haymarket 919. 

WM. O^PSTIOK, 

ASPEN AVENUE, AUBURNDALE, MASS. 

FLORIST. 

Bedding Plants, Cut Roses and Carnations a specialty. 



u6 



LASELL LEAVES 



WOODLAND PARK HOTEL 

AUBURNDALE, MASS. 

Five minutes' walk from Lasell. Open all the year. 
CHAS C. BUTLER. 

HENRY W. GOODWIN, 

78-80 Broad Street, Boston, Mass. 

BRYANT & MAY'S 

L.ONDON PARLOUR MATCHES. 



Preferred Stock 

MOCHA AND JAVA 

COFFEE. 

THE HIGHEST GRADE OF BLENDED COFFEE. 
BOASTED AND PACKED BY 

Martin L. Hall & Co., 

Boston, Mass. 

J. WOODWARD 

FISH, OYSTERS, EGGS, CANNED GOODS, 
VEGETABLES, ETC. 

Cor. Auburn and Ash Sts., Auburndale, Mass. 



BARLOW'S ICE CREAM. 

J. B. SANDERSON, Proprietor. 

Telephone 261-3. WEST NEWTON, MASS. 

Catering in all its branches at reasonable prices. 



BEEF, PORK, LARD, HAMS, BACON, 
PIGS' FEET and TRIPE. 



STURTEVANT & HALEY 
BEEF and SUPPLY CO. 

38 and 40 Faneuil Hall Market, 

BOSTON, MASS. 

TALLOW, STEARINE, 
FINE OLEO, OIL, SCRAP, Eto. 



CHARLESIF. HATHAWAY, 

MANUFACTURING BAKER. 



Crackers, Biscuit, Bread, Cake and Pastry. Wholesale 
jobber of Kennedy's Celebrated Crackers. Hath away 's 
original Home-made Cream Bread, best in the world, 
kept by all leading grocers. 

Factories: 1906 Mass. Ave., Cambridge. 
769 Main Street, Waltham. 



G. D. Harvey. A. C. Farley. W. T. Farley. 

Farley, Harvey «8e Oo. 

Importers and Jobbers of 

Dry Goods. 

141 to 149 ESSEX STREET, BOSTON. 



THIS SPACE IS PAID FOR 



BY A FRIEND. 



W. H. PRIOR. 



C. A. PRIOR 



PRIOR BROS. 

Successors to ffm. Prior, Jr., & Co. 
Wholesale and retail dealers in all kinds of 

Ocean, Lake and River Fish, Oysters and Clams 

127 and 129 Faneuil Sail Market, Boston, Mass. 

Telephone, 673 Haymarket. 

ITewto^. Ice ©@mpaaay. 

TOT^' sold by us is cut from Longfellow's Pond, Wellesley 
IvB Hills. Water from pond is used in Wellesley public 
service. The Newton Ice Co. is prepared to furnish a first 
class quality of FON1D ICE in West Newton, Newton- 
ville, Auburndale, Newton Lower Palls and Wellesley Hills. 

MILLER & HATCH, Props. 

P. O. Address, Newton Lower Falls. 



A Hardware Store for a hundred years. 

Bnrditt & Williams 

Dealers in 

Builders' and General Hardware 
Supplies, Tools and Cutlery. 

20 DOCK SQ., BOSTON. 



LASELL LEAVES 



117 



IP COLLEGE 
GIRL 

Will always find at our store the LATEST 

CONCEITS IN STATIONERY as well as the other 

necessaries for her college work. 

Economical prices prevail. 



THORP & MARTIN CO. 

FINE STATIONERY SHOP. 

12 MILK STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 

Shreye, Crump & Low Co. 

147 Tremont St., Boston. 

JEWELERS and SILVERSMITHS. 



STATIONERY, CLASS and SOCIETY PINS. 

Designs submitted and estimates furnished. 



Tbe Knickerbocker 5boe 




For 
Girls. 

Enamel 
Oxfords 
for 
Spring. 



Ev«rytf)io? in Sboes, $3.50. 

E. W. Burt & Co. 

.... 40 West Street. 



SEND TO ^^aa^i- 



SGHiRME 



MUSIC STORE, 



(The Boston Music Company.) 



26 WEST ST., 



FOR 



BOSTON, MASS. 



Sheet Music, Music Books, Strings, etc, 

Prompt and efficient service as well as advantageous 
price guaranteed. The Singer's Guide, the Piano 
Teachers' Guide, and Choir Master's Guide sent gratis 
to any address. 



Cobb, Aldrich & Co. 



Corner of Washington and Kneeland Streets, Boston. 



ALWAYS have in stock 

THE NICEST assortment 



CRYSTALLIZED VIOLETS. 
All kinds of French Fruits, Glaces, 
Stuffed Prunes, Salted Almonds, 
Pecans and Peanuts, Violet Sachet, 
Bonbonnierres, French Bonbons, Fancy 
Chocolates, Nougatines, Marshmallow, 
Opera Caramels, etc. 



- CONFECTIONS 

OF THEIR OWN MANUFACTURE 

TO BE FOUND ANYWHERE 



FANCY CRACKERS 

OF EVERY 
DESCRIPTION. 



Also a full line of Stuffed Olives, Pim-Olas, Fancy Pickles, 
Preserves and Condiments especially adapted to Dinner and Evening Parties 



CATALOGUE FORWARDED UPON APPLICATION. 



n8 



LA SELL LEAVES 



provides every 
convenience 
for sati-fac- 



THE DAYLI GHT STORE 

tory shopping — parlor for reading, writing and resting — postoffice — telegraph office — safety eleva- 
tors running to basement and upper floors — every coiner thoroughly lighted and ventilated. 
While our effort is to bring an increasing number of customers each diy to the various 
departments, yet our desire is to have every pukchase and the detail of every tran-action so 
conducted by our employees that a fkkling of entire satisfaction will accompany each sale. 
Ladies' Outer Garments, Corsets, Underwear and Shoes are prominent everyday features 
of our store. 



1 






WBflTER AND WASHINGTON 
STREETS, BOSTON, 



THE NEW SCALE 

HALLETT & DAVIS 

PIANOS. 

The recognized standard of the musical world. We 
have no hesitancy in saying that our Piano as made 
today is as near a perfect instrument as is possible to 
manufacture. You should try and hear the New Scale 
Hallett & Davis if you are interested in a beautiful 
toned piano. We can surprise you in price, quality 
and tone. 

Established 60 Years. 179 TREMONT STREET. 



C. W. Davidson, Pres. 
Newtonville. 



F. F. Davidson, Treas. 
Auburndale. 



THOMAS LONG COMPANY, 

77 Summer St., Boston. 

GOLDSMITHS AND SILVERSMITHS. 

Special designs always in stock. 

Newest ideas in Jewelry, Sterling Silver, Cut Glass, 
Umbrellas and Pocket-books. 
Repairing a specialty. 
Makers of Class and Society Pins and Golf Prizes. 

Dr. W. F. HALL, 

Dentist. 

211 Central Street, Near Station, Auburndale. 

HOURS FROM 8 a. m. till 5 p. m. 

Refers by permission to many patients in this city. 

All Fillings warranted. Only the best of materials used. 

Special attention given to Crown and Bridge Work. 

H. B. Thayer 

NEWEST FASHIONS IN SHOES. 

Special discount to students. 
144 TREMONT STREET, BOSTON. 



o 



DD THINGS. 



387 Washington St., 
Boston, Mass. 



Brooches, 
Hat Pins, 
Buckles, 
Posters, 
Steins, 
Flags. 

BENT & BUSH. 




EILih'S 



6th Avenue 20 to 2 1st St., fi. Y. 

Lift VlDfl 

Str&igbt Fropt 

CORSETS. 

The Best Product of American Skill, Sur- 
passing in Wearing Qualities and Fit, and 
equalling in finish the best Imported 
Gored Corset sold in New York, and 

Fifty per cent. 
Cbe&p^r in Price. 

They are Strictly Handmade, French 
Gored, Bias Cut and all Whalebone, and 
we guarantee every pair to give entire 
satisfaction, both as to fit and wearing 
qualities. 



Fascll Awes 



44 



DUX FEA\1NA FACTI. 



*r 



VOL. XXVI 



Lasell Seminary, Auburndale, Mass., March, 1901. 



Number 6 



Published monthly during the School year by the Lasell Publishing Association. 



FLORENCE BREWER. 

Local Editor. 
JOANNA F. DEERING, '02. 



Editor-in-chief. 
KATHERINE E. McCOY, '01. 

Associate Editors. 
BESSIE M. DRAPER, '02. 

Subscription Agent. 
ANNIE MAE PINKHAM, '02. 



IDA M. MAI^ORY, '03 

Exchange Editor. 

LEUA A. WALKER, '01. 



Business Manager. 
ETHLYN F. BARBER, '01. 



Asst. Business Manager. 
JOANNA F. DEERING, '02. 



TERMS, in Advance: One copy, one year (including Postage), $1.00. Single copies, 15 cents. 







ADVERTISING RATES. 








SPACE. 


3 months 


6 months 


9 months 


SPACE. 


3 months 


6 months 


9 months 


1-8 Column, .... 
1-6 .... 
1-4 " .... 


$2.00 
3.00 
4.00 


$3.75 
5.00 
6.50 


$5.00 
6.50 
9.00 


1-2 Column, .... 
3-4 " .... 
1 " .... 


$6.50 

9.00 

12.00 


$11.00 
15.00 
19.00 


$15.00 
20.00 
25.00 


The Editors will be glad to receive from the students and Alumnae any communications and items of 
interest to the school. 



Editorials. 



"The principals and teachers of the Chi- 
cago High schools have declared themselves 
in favor of abolishing formal exercises on 
graduation days. At their meeting Feb. 1 
they passed a resolution of sympathy and 
support to Assistant Supt. Nightingale in 
his efforts to have the present graduation ex- 
ercises done away with. Mr. Nightingale's 
objection to these exercises is that they are 
attended with needless expense, often caus- 
ing suffering and sacrifice among the parents 
of children; that the exercises tend to make 
the graduates conceited, and that the ad- 
dresses delivered to them on these occasions, 
though well-meant, do more harm than good. 

Dr. Nightingale's suggestions were 



adopted Feb. 2 by the school management 
committee of the board of education' 

It would be interesting to know what the 
scholars of the Chicago schools think of this 
new plan. Graduation is always looked for- 
ward to by young people as one of the most 
important events in their lives, and if the 
graduation exercises should be abolished 
much of the pleasure and interest now at- 
tending the close of their school course would 
be lost. That this custom has some evils is 
apparent, and we acknowledge that they are 
evils not easy to correct, but we find it diffi- 
cult to say that we approve of entirely doing 
away with these exercises. It is true that 
the expense connected with graduation is 



120 



LASELL LEAVES 



often needless and often demands of parents 
no little sacrifice, in the case of those of slen- 
der means. This is especially true in the 
case of public schools, where there are all 
classes of scholars, from the rich to the very 
poor, than in private schools, where the pu- 
pils are more nearly of the same social stand- 
ing. In public schools, when graduation 
time comes, the poor pupils naturally wish 
to look as well and to contribute as much to 
the class expenses as the rich children. This 
desire is usually shared by the parents; con- 
sequently the scholars often spend far beyond 
their means. We cannot so easily see why 
the exercises should tend to make the gradu- 
ates conceited. Surely, if those who re- 
ceive honors and praise are worthy, they will 
not be so weak as to be puffed up by this. 
The addresses given on these occasions are 
very often inappropriate and uninteresting, 
and may sometimes, perhaps, do harm, but 
we venture to say, although it is not to the 
credit of the student, that nine times out of 
ten he does not remember ten days thereafter 
any of the opinions, sentiments, or advice 
given in his graduation address. This is 
only from the student's pont of view, and 
we do not wish anyone to suppose that we 
think we know the facts of the case better 
than do the instructors and superintendents 
of schools. Young people very often dis- 
like most the things that are best for them, 
and vice versa; and this may not impossibly 
be a case in point. 



Queen Wilhelmina. 



A Daily Thought. — There is no mor- 
tification, however keen, no misery, however 
desperate, which the spirit of woman cannot 
in some degree lighten or alleviate. — Lord 
Beaconsfield. 



— It comes naturally for some women to 
put on their clothes straight. Others will 
use innumerable hooks and buttons and 
fourteen extra safety pins, and yet look like 
the trail of a cyclone. 



THE recent marriage of this young 
sovereign, who has always been sin- 
cerely beloved and reverenced by her people, 
has again brought her prominently into pub- 
lic notice; hence it is especially interesting 
at this time to study her life and her per- 
sonality. 

Her mother, the Queen Regent, brought 
up her little daughter as simply as possible, 
and, as a girl, Wilhelmina spent most of her 
time quietly at The Hague with only the oc- 
casional excitement of a visit to relatives in 
Germany, her mother's native land. Of 
course her girlhood was necessarily different 
from that of most children. She was oblig- 
ed to spend much time upon various difficult 
branches of learning which ordinary girls 
are not obliged to study, under the direction 
of an English lady, who was her teacher un- 
til she was nearly eighteen. Nevertheless 
this little queen found time to indulge in 
many of the innocent pastimes of childhood, 
although her rank deprived her of the in- 
timates which make such amusements 
doubly enjoyable. The following story il- 
lustrates the loneliness of her early child- 
hood. "Wilhelmina, when a small child was 
one day overheard by her governess while 
thus scolding a favorite doll : 'Now be good 
and quiet; because if you don't, I will turn 
you into a queen, and then you'll not have 
anyone to play with at all !' " Despite this 
fact we are told that as a child she was "a 
merry, sunshiny little girl, usually seen in 
white, a large, broad-brimmed hat with a 
white ostrich feather, half hiding the pretty 
face, and the long, fair hair rippling down 
her shoulders. Now she has changed into 
a tall, slender maiden, full of grace and royal 
majesty," but is still so young that it might 
seem as if the duties and responsibilities, 
which every sovereign must face, would 



LASELL LEAVES 121 

prove too difficult for her — indeed they Prince Henry, as his Royal Highness is now 

would had she not the love of the whole na- called, in spite of the fact that he is a Ger- 

tion to strengthen her, and no little good man, a people of whose influence the Dutch 

mother-wit to aid her. have for years been jealous. 

Both the Queen and her mother have won Of her three palaces, the one which Wil- 
their way deep into the hearts of the Dutch helmina likes best is called the "Queen's Pal- 
by their cheerful dispositions, their sincere ace in the Wood." Situated on the border 
kindness of heart, and their consideration of a beautiful park, just outside of Amster- 
and courtesy for their people. "Fortunately dam and completely hidden from view 
for them," says one writer, the heir apparent, among the trees which surround it, this is 
an unpromising youth, died in Paris some described as a "veritable fairy palace, which 
years ago, and his little sister, with her na- calls to mind the fabled abode of the Sleep- 
tive sweetness of disposition and her wise ing Beauty." It is here, amid these beauti- 
bringing up, has become ruler by inheritance ful surroundings, that she and her husband 
over their beloved Holland." will doubtless spend many happy hours to- 

When Wilhelmina was about seventeen gether, when from time to time their duties 
years old, she and her mother took a journey permit them a few leisure days, 
to England to visit the latter's sister. Here Probably no queen, except Victoria, has 
she first met Queen Victoria, who heartily ever been so well beloved by her people as is 
welcomed her. The early lives and love af- this youthful sovereign, and although her 
fairs of these two queens seems strangely future cannot be so magnificent, or her in- 
similar. Both came to the throne at an fluence as far-reaching, yet we all hope that 
early age, one to rule one of the most power- her reign may be as noble and elevating as 
ful nations, the other a country comparative- was that of her who has so recently passed 
ly small, yet owning some of the richest colo- away from her earthly kingdom ; and we, as 
nies of the world; both married about two Americans, echo with great good will the 
years after receiving the crown; and the prayer of the people of Holland: "God save 
motive of both marriages was love, and not good Queen Wilhelmina." 
politics as is so often the case among sover- M. H. G., '02. 



eigns. - ~ 

In the Outlook we find the following in- — The wise man who alwa y s knows J ust 

teresting statement concerning the proposed which way the wind is going to blow is apt 

change in the wording of the marriage cere- to " e a n ttle vane - 

mony by which the Queen of Holland was —Bear your own burdens first; after that 

united to Duke Henry of Mecklenburg- try to help carry those of other people.— 

Schwerin: "It is stated that the marriage George Washington. 

contract provides that the Queen shall yield — In this world it is not what we take up, 

obedience to her husband as a wife, but not as but what we give up, that makes us rich.— 

a Queen, but that, by the Queen's own desire Henry Ward Beecher. 

no modification was made in the usual vows — It is the root of bitterness which must be 

of obedience in the marriage ceremony." struck at, else we labor in vain. "Crucify 

The people participated for two days in the the flesh." In vain do we go about to purge 

festivities of the occasion, and seemingly the streams if we are at no pains about the 

they entertain only kindly feelings towards muddy fountain. — John Wesley. 



122 



LASELL LEAVES 



From London to Paris via Newhaven 
and Dieppe. 



Having been in London two weeks and a 
half, it was time that we should go on to 
Paris. We had decided that we would go 
via Newhaven and Dieppe. The question 
now came up whether we should travel sec- 
ond or third class. Of course one most de- 
sires to go first class ; but in traveling abroad 
unless one has almost unlimited means, one 
has to be on the constant lookout for the 
farthings, sous or pfenninge, as the case may 
be. It may at first seem mean to calculate 
so closely as that, but there are always so 
many uses for money that unless tourists are 
constantly on the watch, they suddenly find 
their means greatly reduced, and are yet far 
from having done what they intended to do. 
In America one does not think about the 
cost of one's ticket, but in England and on 
the continent, this question has to be consid- 
ered, and it is surprising how comfortably 
one can travel second class ; in fact, most peo- 
ple travel that way from choice. Even 
third class traveling is very comfortable; that 
is, on some lines. 

For our own part, we concluded to travel 
second class, since thus we should journey 
in the day time, so that we could see the coun- 
try, which was new to me; and we antici- 
pated a very pleasant time. The night be- 
fore we started, however, the wind blew hard 
in London, and I made the remark to my 
friend that I thought we should have a 
rather rough crossing, and then thought no 
more about it. In the morning the other 
people in the house seemed to be rather sur- 
prised that we were going, but we said, 
"Why, yes," in answer to their inquiries, and 
wondered what they meant by speaking in 
that depreciating way. 

We drove to the Victoria station, all the 
way rejoicing that we had such a pleasant 



day for our trip. After purchasing our 
tickets we entered our compartment in the 
train. Unless you have seen these compart- 
ments, I think they would seem very queer 
to you. The mode of travel here is so en- 
tirely unlike our way of traveling in Amer- 
ica. 

Our ride to Newhaven was but an hour 
and a half, yet in that short space of time 
the wind increased to a gale. In fact, it 
seemed as if the howling wind was so strong 
that it impeded the progress of the train; 
besides this, a driving rain came on. By 
this time we had come to the conclusion that 
we should not have a very pleasant crossing, 
but little did we suspect all that we should 
have to endure before reaching our rooms 
in Paris. 

The train was a little late in arriving at 
the dock, but we were soon all aboard, al- 
though in going along the platform to the 
boat we seemed in great danger of being 
blown off our feet, particularly just as we 
reached the deck. "Personne n'est permis 
de r ester sur le pont!" We were ordered 
below immediately. This was a great dis- 
appointment, as we had looked forward to 
being up on deck; but it was inevitable, and 
down some narrow, steep, dark stairs we had 
to go. There were in the cabin about twelve 
ladies of various nationalities. 

You know by this time that we were on 
a French boat. The stewardess, naturally, 
was French, also, and talking like lightning 
all the time. I could understand but little 
of what she said. All made themselves as 
comfortable as possible. The stewardess 
asked me when I was going to lie down, and 
seemed very indignant when I said that I did 
not wish to lie down yet, receiving this reply 
with the remark that soon I'd be glad enough 
to do so, a remark I did not understand till 
my friend translated it for me. As for the 
stewardess herself, she came and comforta- 



LASELL LEAVES 



123 



bly lay down on the sofa, and the one little surging several feet high, and the spray 
gleam of the kerosene lamp was turned out, ■'■ blowing many feet above that. "Crossing 



and there we were in the close, dark cabin, 
thinking how glad we should be when the 
rough trip was over. 

The boat presently made a start, or seemed 
to do so, and we thought we were off; but 
in looking out of the tiny portholes, I could 



the bar!" So often I had heard those 
words, but never seemed to have thought of 
their true meaning; but now it was evident 
to me. And later I realized it all the more 
fully. If we could only have crossed the 
bar, we could then have made the passage 



discern all the time the same posts of the •'' easily. 



dock, and the only motion of the boat was 
that made by the waves. In a few minutes 
the stewardess went to see what the trouble 
was, and brought us back word that it was 
so rough that the boat could not get out. 
This, she said, was the first time any of the 
boats on that line had been unable to leave 
port. Upon receiving this unwelcome news 
every lady arose, all beginning to speculate 



Some of us now settled ourselves to take 
a nap, but soon after several men came in 
and began to hammer and pound in putting 
up side-boards to the berths. My friend, 
who went out/to the station to send a tele- 
gram, saw, while walking on the platform, 
a lady lifted off her feet, and blown to the 
middle of the track. This perhaps will 
give you some idea of the force of the gale. 



as to when we should be able to start, while At last the rain ceased, and the blue sky be- 
the stewardess began to tell us about her ter- ■■' gan to appear They told us now that we 
rible passage of the night before, — how ill : should start in the evening. We had dinner 
she was and how little able to be on the boat // on the boat. We had become so tired and 
she now felt. We thought that was a rather V» hungry that the meal was refreshing, even 
dismal outlook for, us, if the boat should ? though the room was not of the cleanest and 
start, and we should be ill. We seemed the men had been smoking there shortly be- 



hardly likely to receive much care "or atten- 
tion. 

Then came a period of conflicting reports. 
One minute we would hear that probably the 
boat would not go till the next day, and then 
we would hear that it might start in a few 
minutes. I have heard it said that the fas- 
cination of life is its uncertainty. If uncer- 
tainty, then, had been all that was needed, 
we should surely have been greatly fascin- 
ated. Many of us had brought a lunch 
along, and this we found very convenient/ 



fore it ,' was served. Again we were in- 
formed that it was doubtful whether we 
should get out that night, and were ordered 
to transfer to another boat. So, with our 
grips, we made our way thither. By this 
time the stars were twinkling in the sky like 
diamonds, and the wind was not quite so 
boisterous. We made our way on to the 
other boat and through sundry dark pas- 
sages, but when we came to some very dark 
stairs, where it seemed as if we were going 
into an unknown abyss, we remonstrated, 



At last we heard that if the boat did not go only to be told that no lights were to ibe 

between three and half past, it would not go turned on till later, and had to make our way 

at all; and now all anxiously awaited that as well as we could down the dark stairs. I 

time. It came at last, but the boat did not expected most certainly to land on my head, 

start. Some of us went up on deck and rather than on my feet. It was a pleasant 

looked out to sea. Not far from us, just at disappointment to find when once 1 had 

the bar, we could see the waves rising and safely reached the cabin, that it was a great 

6-V 



124 



LASELL LEAVES 



improvement on that we had just left. This 
was an English boat. But here, too, the 
stewardess told us how ill she was, and how 
little she felt like making another crossing. 
It seemed as though we were fated. Every- 
body was tired, and we immediately settled 
ourselves for the night, caring little whether 
we crossed or not. After waiting till eleven 
for the arrival of another train with more 
passengers, we at last left port, after only 
tivelve hours' delay. 

For five hours we knew what it is to be 
rocked "in the cradle of the deep." The 
boat rocked, rolled, plunged, pitched, creaked 
and groaned in an awful way, but most of us 
were too ill to care for that. My friend was 
never so seasick in her life, and I, who never 
had a qualm in my nine days' crossing the 
ocean, though we had what is called "a whole 
gale, and very rough sea," — I was sick after 
having been out only two hours ! 

At last, at 4 a. m., we reached Dieppe. 
When we came up on deck the stars and 
moon were shining as brightly as though 
there had been no commotion so short a time 
previously. The fresh air was so reviving 
that the minute it struck my face I laughed 
and wondered whether it were possible that 
I had been ill, or whether I had dreamed it 
all. Unfortunately my friend was not thus 
quickly revived. 

We had to stop at the station to have part 
of our luggage examined, after which we es- 
tablished ourselves in our compartment in 
the train for Paris, — a four hours' ride. 
After all that we had been through we had to 
resort to our little bottle of champagne and 
our oranges for refreshment. Had it not 
been for these, I doubt if we should be here 
to tell the tale. After over an hour's wait- 
ing, we finally started. We tried to get 
what sleep we could, but this consisted only 
of cat-naps. After awhile my friend said 
that we were near Rouen. I was too tired 



to know or care where we were, yet I dimly 
recollected that the name of Rouen sounded 
rather familiar. "What about Rouen? I 
have heard of it before." 

"Yes, it is where Joan of Arc was burned." 
"Oh, yes," I said. "I remember." 
At the station we thought we ought to 
get something to eat, though I assure you 
that neither of us felt like eating anything. 
However, we ordered two cups of coffee to 
be brought to the carriage door. Coffee! 
The word "mud" hardly describes what ap- 
peared before us. We could not drink it, 
but had the pleasure of paying a fabulous 
price for it. 

Finally, by nine o'clock, we found our- 
selves in Paris. Here we had to have the 
rest of our baggage examined, and after 
that was done we looked about for a carriage. 
An Austrian girl who could not speak a word 
of French had come with us, and my friend 
saw that she had a carriage, and was about 
to leave her, when the driver said, "Are n't 
you coming, too?" 

"Why, I have a trunk, too." 
"That doesn't make any difference." 
"But I have a friend with me who has two 
trunks." 

"But that doesn't make any difference!" 
"But the three of us are not going to the 
same place." 

"Oh, that doesn't make a bit of differ- 
ence!" 

The capacity of the cab and the power of 
the horse seemed to be unlimited. So, with 
four heavy trunks on top of the hack, and 
three persons with hand luggage inside, we 
started, and it seemed as if the whole thing 
must tip over and spill all of us out into the 
street. But no such thing happened, and 
we reached our several destinations safely, 
and were safely deposited, both luggage and 
persons. 

You see, then, that even across the water, 



LASELL LEAVES 



125 



one is not free from all vexations and annoy- 
ances. After hearing all this, would you 
dare to cross the ocean? I assure you it 
pays, though travelling, like some other 
things, is a matter of "better or worse"; yet, 
if one is determined to make the best of it, 
there is more "better" than at first appears. 

V. I. W. 



College Christianity. 

It is not a novel fact to college men, but 
it needs to be restated now and then for the 
benefit of others that the proportion of Chris- 
tian students in our colleges and universi- 
ties never was larger than at present. 
Moreover, they include more than ever be- 
fore of the leaders. At the annual Yale 
dinner in this city last week it was emphasiz- 
ed by more than one of the visitors from 
New Haven that a large number of the fore- 
most Yale athletes, members of the football 
team, university crew, etc., not only are 
scholars of good, or even high, rank but al- 
so are active in Christian Association and 
other philanthropic and religious work. 
Presumably the same thing is true in other 
institutions. The student world has learned 
that to be a Christian renders one more of a 
man instead of narrowing his range of in- 
terests and abridging his opportunities. 
When such men take the lead in study or 
sport, the whole tone and temper of the col- 
lege life is elevated. We have believed for 
years, and often have insisted, that the moral 
perils of college life are apt to be exaggerated 
by those who do not know it intimately, and 
that its influence is distinctly and increasing- 
ly elevating and Christian. Such facts as 

those just mentioned confirm this belief. 

♦ — 

The first air pump was made in 1650. 

— If a man love the labor of any trade, 
apart from any question of success or fame, 
the gods have called him. — Robert Louis 
Stevenson. 




PERSONALS. 

— Bess Bailey ('96), writes from Orlando, 
Florida, where she and Margaret have been 
spending the winter. Her sister Lillian, 
who went thither with them, married a Dr. 
Mayo, of Indianapolis, "and," says Bess, 
"they both went away at once, leaving us 
here in a boarding house, to miss them 
dreadfully." She saw May and Lucy Muth 
in Cincinnati, called on them, indeed, at 
their lovely Avondale home. Ella Ampt 
('96) — she was then — was in the city at the 
time, with her mother, and Bess saw them 
also. 

— Eva Cole still remembers old friends. 
She has had a delightful western trip, she 
writes, she and one of her friends accom- 
panying as guests Ex-governor Fifer, of the 
Interstate Commerce Commission, and his 
wife in their trip by special train and private 
car to California and back, going by the 
southern route and returning by way of Port- 
land, Seattle, Salt Lake City and Denver. 
She was east also during the fall, and regrets 
not having been able to come to Boston be- 
fore returning home. At Helene Little 
Peck's wedding she was a guest, and at 
Laura Chapman Anderson's, as was also 
Helen Morris — Helen Thresher Hartzell 
lives at Bloomington now. She and Eva 
meet often. 

/ — Lee Lufkin, (here in '83,) has recently 
had several noticeably good portraits on ex- 
hibition at the Boston Art Club. She has 
spent much of the time since leaving Lasell 



126 



LASELL LEAVES 



in the study of art, and for the past two years 
has made it profitable as well as pleasant. 
She was one of those who attended the La- 
sell luncheon in New York this winter. She 
expects to be at Ogunquit this summer, and 
will take pupils in drawing and painting, 
from the figure and head. • 

— Margie Schuberth has had a visit from 
Dorothy Manning. 

— Edith Moulton ('99), visited Nellie 
Edmonds in October, Nellie is living at 
Meadville now, where the family moved over 
a year ago. She has a brother in Allegheny 
college. Minta Henne, who lives only a few 
miles from Meadville, Edith did not see, 
since she was then at Minneapolis. In No- 
vember she visited Grace Houghton, who 
is doing fine work there. While with Grace 
she saw in some of their trips about the 
country, the tomb of William Henry Harri- 
son at North Bend, and the famous Rook- 
wood Pottery. As guests of Mr. George 
Stone, one of the stock-holders of the electric 
railway in Cincinnati, she and Grace had a 
delightful trip through the city and suburbs 
in a director's car. Lucy Muth, she says, 
is teaching in a kindergarten. From Cin- 
cinnati Edith went to Washington, via West 
Virginia and Virginia, and had a fine time at 
the capital. Then on to New Brunswick, 
New Jersey, to see Lucy Carter Lee, whose 
husband is principal of the high school 
there. Lucy was here in '96. "She is a 
good housekeeper," says Edith. Mary 
Vance she sees occasionally. 

— Anna Bartlett Shepard attended the D. 
A. R. Congress held recently in Washington. 
She speaks of having met during this trip 
a Mrs. Davis of Portland, one of our old 
girls, and a friend of Grace Fribley Pen- 
nell's. Anna has three little boys, eleven, 
nine, and seven, respectively, and seems 
quite happy. 

— Miss Lucy Tappan, who in the early 



eighties was here as head of the mathematic's 
department, is, after a long absence, again at 
home, in Gloucester, Mass. In French, 

German and Spanish, as in English lan- 
guage and literature, she is a teacher of ex- 
ceptional qualification. She taught for 
awhile in Denver University — French and 
German. The text-book, "Topical Notes on 
American Authors," is her work. 

— Alma Widstrand Rogers and her hus- 
band are planning a spring trip to Seattle 
to see Mr. Rogers' parents, stopping on the 
way to see Alma's, also. Mr. and Mrs. 
Rogers are living now in Roxbury, 73 Ruth- 
ven street. 

— A copy of the Brooklyn Eagle, recently 
sent us, contains an article descriptive of 
the attractive home of Dr. and Mrs. Victor 
Baillard — our Maud Littlefield of former 
days. This home is the old Coe mansion 
on Washington avenue, Brooklyn, which is 
described as most delightfully arranged and 
furnished. It is styled "Bohemia" by the 
appreciative guests there entertained, be- 
cause of the unusual degree to which they are 
accorded the freedom of the house, "from 
drawing-room to roof," says the paper. The 
drawing-room, by the way, is styled the 
music room, and among its other furnish- 
ings, has in it an Alexander organ of notice- 
ably fine tone. The Baillard's are musical. 
A December glee club concert and dance, 
given at the Pouch Gallery by Dr. Baillard's 
glee club, was enthusiastically praised by 
many who had the pleasure of being present. 

— Mr. J. D. Smith, whose wife — our Amy 
Hall — died January 6, leaving her two dear 
little girls motherless, sends a photograph 
of these little ones for the Lasell album. 
Bright, attractive-looking children they are. 
Sad that they should so early have lost the 
priceless gift of a mother's love and care. 
Amy's illness (a long one) and death were 
peculiarly sad. 



LASELL LEAVES 



127 



— Julia Hogg Powell's father tells us that 
she and the children are "pictures of health," 
and that Julia is doing her own housework. 
Evidently enough she is no longer an invalid. 
Lulie sends Leaves subscriptions, and Nan, 
he says, has gone to the farm to live. 

— Nettie Woodbury has developed into a 
full-fledged school-ma'am — with a school all 
her own, beautifully located near Beverly, 
Mass., and "preparatory to Lasell," her 
pretty catalogue announces. This little 

pamphlet contains views round about the 
school, and one the house, exterior, and one 
of a very attractive-looking study. The 
school receives but a small number of pupils, 
and only under fifteen, but these will be well 
taken care of, and must find school-life here 
very pleasant. 

— One day in the Christmas vacation, Miss 
Ransom was very much surprised to see Dr. 
George Shinn, of Newton, enter the church 
in Williamsport and preach. Williams- 
port seems such an out of the way place from 
Newton; but it appears that his daughter 
married and moved to Williamsport. Hence 
his visit there. 

— Born to Mr. and Mrs. Guy Shepard of 
Glen avenue, Omaha, Neb., a daughter. 
Mrs. Shepard was formerly Gertrude I. 
Gleason, (here from '91 to '92) of Council 
Bluffs, Iowa. 

— Rosie Best wants it understood that she 
is no more Rosie, but Rosamond. All cor- 
respondents please take notice. 

— We are sorry to hear that Caraline 
Ebersole Martin ('85), has been very ill — 
invalided for six long months! Too bad. 
But we rejoice that she is now better and 
steadily improving. She writes a sweet let- 
ter breathing so beautiful a spirit that we are 
shamed of our impatience at little ills! 

— Mr. Bragdon had a delightful luncheon 
with Mrs. William and Miss Clementina 
Butler. Mr. Clancy, who will be our next 



Missionary Bishop for India, was the guest 
of honor. These friends are always such 
genial hosts that it is one of the most de- 
lightful places to visit on the whole continent. 
Mrs. Butler is in fine health,and just her 
same self. Clementina can make the best 
curry out of India. So Mr. Clancy said, 
and he knows. 

— Henry P. Moulton, who has lately been 
appointed United States District Attorney, 
is the father of our Edith Moulton, of Salem, 
of the class of '99. 

— Mabel Lutes ('95), although she lives 
at Newton, keeps her membership in the 
Church of the Messiah, which she attended 
when a pupil here, and has a Sunday-school 
class of sixteen girls. 

■ — Cora Shackford Tilton writes : "I have 
always the happiest memories of Lasell, and 
trust I may be able to influence others to go 
there." She has in Salem a pleasant home, 
and enjoys, too, her church life in that city. 
Her two bright children are boys, — no girls 
for Lasell. 

— Blanche Gardner ('00), Katherine 
White ('00), and Alice Jenckes ('99) had a 
pleasant visit at Emilie Kothe's ('00), short- 
ly after Alice Taylor's wedding. While 
there they were entertained by Gertrude and 
Lilian Taggart, who gave a luncheon in their 
honor. Here they met Flora Ketcham, and 
Mrs. Thompson, Floss Plum's sister. Jes- 
sie Eckhouse, too, gave a party for them. 
Alice Jenckes, after the termination of this 
visit, went to see Alice Kendall ('99), and 
thence to Rhode Island, where she saw Ma- 
rion Stafford and Jo Milliken ('99). Alice 
Ashley ('00) is enjoying herself in Hono- 
lulu, and Carita Curtis ('99) is to "come 
out" soon. Katherine Mason ('99) is mak- 
ing a trip east which is to include Boston. 



— The misfortunes hardest to bear are 
those which never come. — Lowell. 



128 



LASELL LEAVES 




On the evening of February 9 the seniors 
gave an entertainment consisting of a scarf 
drill, living pictures, a burlesque drama, and 
music. Owing to the good management of 
the stage directors, the curtain rose prompt- 
ly at eight, on a well-filled gymnasium. The 
opening- number on the program, music by 
the Lasell Mandolin and Guitar Club, was 
followed by the scarf drill by twelve girls 
dressed in pink. The grace and ease with 
which they moved was really beautiful, and 
the final tableau, one to be remembered. The 
living pictures were unusually well present- 
ed, and much credit is due the girls who se- 
lected such fine subjects. The play en- 
titled "Hamlet's Brides," was bright and well 
acted. We are all proud of our seniors, and 
think that another class of equal originality 
and talent would be hard to find. 

February 10. — The S. D.'s gave the La- 
sellia Club their long talked of sleigh ride. 
It was a beautiful night, and cold, but thanks 
to Miss Nutt, we were well wrapped up and 
did not mind it in the least. There were 



about fifty in all, and the only thing we re- 
gretted was that we could not sing louder, 
although possibly we were heard as it was. 
Returning at about ten o'clock, we went 
down to the dining-room where a delicious* 
supper was served, after which we went to 
our rooms, thanking the S. D. girls for one 
of the most enjoyable evenings of the year. 

February 14 — Mr. Wharton James gave a 
lecture upon the novel "Ramona." The 
speaker having lived in the very places spok- 
en of by H. H. in this book, was eminently 
fitted to take it as his theme, and aided by a 
series of good stereopticon views, he made 
it easy for us to imagine ourselves in Cali- 
fornia, living over the sad life of Ramona, 
and aflame with indignation at her cause- 
less injuries and wrongs. Mr. James said 
that although the novel itself was wholly 
fictitious, there nevertheless had been a real 
Ramona, whose husband was actually killed 
for horse stealing. As we were all familiar 
with Mrs. Jackson's novel, we were delight- 
ed to hear about it from so able a speaker 
as Mr. James, and when, afterwards by 
means of a gramophone we were given the 
unusual pleasure of hearing the story of the 
horse stealing from the lips of the very man 
who killed the real Ramona's husband, we 
felt almost as if we had been witnesses of the 
murder. 

On the morning of February 15 Mr. James 
again talke dto us about one, whom he call- 
ed one of our greatest American poets, 
Joaquin Miller. Mr. Miller received his 
name Joaquin from one of his own poems, 
which, at the time of publication met much 
unfavorable criticism. The subject of this 
poem was a well-known Indian bandit and 
robber, by the name of Joaquin Murietta, 
who had been cruelly wronged by whites, and 
was unable to obtain any redress, and who 
for this reason had turned his hand against 
men in general. Because the poet tried to 



LASELL LEAVES 



129 



show that there might still be something 
good in the heart of this man, and pointed 
out that he had been hounded to this course 
by injustice and cruelty, Miller himself 
was derisively called Joaquin, a name which 
he proudly adopted, signing it to his publish- 
ed work, so that few people know now, that 
the real name of this sweet singer of Cali- 
fornia, is Cincinnatus. The speaker also 
told a story of Mr. Miller which he said is 
characteristic of his simple, beautiful soul 
and his dislike for conventionalities. He 
had long been desirous to meet Mrs. Lang- 
try, which pleasure was his upon the occasion 
of a reception given by Lady Constance 
Flower. Mr. Miller had been told to come 
as a Californian, and accordingly, on the ap- 
pointed evening presented himself, dressed 
in an old red cotton shirt, blue overalls tuck- 
ed inside large boots, and wearing an im- 
mense sombrero which he did not for awhile 
take off. Lady Constance knowing him, 
was hardly shocked at his attire, though she 
must have been a little surprised. When he 
was introduced to Mrs. Langtry, instead of 
responding in the usual conventional way, 
he took off his sombrero with a sweeping 
movement, showering down upon her from 
its capacious crown a myriad of pink rose 
leaves, saying at the same time, "California's 
tribute to the Jersey Lily." We were very 
grateful to Mr. James for giving us this lit- 
tle insight into the life of such a poet. Af- 
ter hearing the beautiful poem, we were all 
eager to look up more about a man of whom 
America may well be proud. 

It is seldom that our schoolmates favor 
us with entertainments of their own devis- 
ing, but on February 28 we spent a delight- 
ful evening listening to an organ recital giv- 
en by Misses Ward and Walker. The pro- 
gram was as follows : 

Aria, Bach 

Andante in Kb, Dunham 



Offertory, Batiste 

Miss Walker. 

Agnus Dei della Requiem, Verdi 
Pastorale, Guilmant 

Miss Walker and Miss Ward. 

Praeludium, Bach 

Offertory in D, Salome 

Processional March, Whitney 

Miss Ward. 

We are proud to have two such fine or- 
ganists as Miss Ward and Miss Walker, and 
are looking forward to the time when we 
may hear them again. 

On the evening of the 16th of February 
the Christian Endeavor Society listened with 
interest to Mrs. Frances E. Clarke, who 
spoke of the recent Portland Convention held 
on February 2, the twentieth anniversary of 
the founding of the society by Dr. Clarke. 
Mrs. Clarke told of the pleasant trip from 
Auburndale to Portland; of the meeting with 
old friends and new; of the pleasure in listen- 
ing to the speakers at the Convention; lead- 
ing workers in the Christian Endeavor field, 
and gave us bits of several of the speeches. 

February 18 — This evening a number of 
the girls were given the opportunity of see- 
ing Ben Hur, which is being played at the 
Colonial Theatre in Boston. The staging 
was very good, and the scenic effects very 
realistic. Our interest did not flag from 
first to last, indeed we were sorry it was not 
longer. We shall not often have the ad- 
vantage of seeing a more finely staged play. 

Through the kindness of Melle LeRoyer 
the Senior French class were given the op- 
portunity of attending the course of lectures 
given by Monsieur Gaston Deschamps at 
Harvard during the last month. Monsieur 
Deschamps spoke on the French Drama, a 
subject especially interesting to the class, 
since they have just been reading several of 
the best French plays, and were very glad to 
hear so distinguished a scholar talk on that 
subject. 

Of course patriotic Lasell girls could not 



130 



LASELL LEAVES 



allow February 22 to go by unnoticed, and 
this year we celebrated it with due ceremony. 
The dining-room was prettily decorated in 
red, white and blue, and the girls dressed in 
light gowns, with powdered hair, made it a 
prettier picture than ever. When the or- 
chestra played the tune, "The Red, White 
and Blue," we could stand it no longer, and 
rising sang heartily the dear old song. The 
menu printed on cardboard hatchets was as 
follows : 

Mock Bisque 

Radishes 

Roast Turkey, Cranberry Jelly 

Boiled Ham, Currant Jelly Sauce 

Mashed Potatoes Corn 

Lemon Sherbet 

Cherry Pie Bombe Glacee 

Candy Cake Fruit 

Coffee 

Brigden's Orchestra 

On the reverse side was the program of 

toasts, which was to follow the dinner. 

Miss Zoe Hill acted as toast mistress, and 

introduced the speakers with her usual 

charming manner, the first being Miss Ruth 

Skinner with a toast, "To the Mother of our 

Country." 

Should you ask to whom these verses,_ 
Should you ask to whom this toast is, 
I would answer, I would tell you, — 
Martha Washington the mother, 
Mother of our glorious country; 
To the helpful wife and tender, 
To the well beloved Martha. 

She was neither proud nor haughty, 
Neither was she false and fickle; 
But a woman pure and loving, 
Worthy of our great devotion, 

Can you picture her, our mother, 
With her snowy powdered tresses — 
Part in curls, which fell behind her, 
Part a crown of silver making — 
Clad in silk with dainty bodice, 
Clad in flowing robe and stately? 

She had courtliest of manners, 

Perfect and yet unaffected; 

Talked so low with voice so gentle 

That none save those near could hear her ; 

Sat with both feet on the floor; 

Quiet, she, yet sweetly, gracious ; 

Smiled, but never laughed out loudly. 

If we think of our great parents, 
Parents of our mighty country, 



Can we say as evolutionists, 
Man is ever growing better, 
Growing to a higher level, 
Higher minded, nearer perfect? 

Rather, must we as their children, 
Think ourselves far, far below them, 
Yet we'll follow in their footsteps ; 
Draw from them our needed lessons. 
So for you our Lasell mothers, 
Mothers until June the eleventh, 
And for you, our mother Martha 
We are very, very grateful. 

Should you ask to whom these verses, 
Should you ask to whom this toast is, 
I would answer, I would tell you, 
Martha Washington, the mother, 
Mother of our glorious country, 
To the helpful wife and tender, 
To the well beloved Martha. 

The next Miss Bessie Lunn, on, "What 
Would George Washington Do If He Came 
to Lasell." 



THE good Saint Peter heard a knock on 
the heaven-side of his gate. He 
looked startled for a moment, because, you 
know, people usually want to get into heav- 
en and not out, then calmly answered, 
"Wait." He took his heavy key from its 
nail beside him there, and as he turned the 
rusty lock and the gates slowly swung out on 
their creaking hinges, I beheld a vision 
fair. Now who was it, do you think ? A 
friar? No; not at all. Guess again! 
'Twas the man who never was a liar. 
George Washington! And, as he stood I 
heard him say, "Pray, can you tell me, Saint 
Peter, a way by which I can get into Lasell ; 
for it pleaseth me well to visit that semi- 
nary. I have heard that of all boarding- 
schools that a person may choose, that is the 
nearest perfection; so, if you've no objec- 
tion, I should like to go down, for we want 
soon to start one up here of our own." 
Saint Peter's face would have melted a 
stone. He beamed, and chuckled, and rub- 
bed his head. At last, "Fair Sir," he said, 
"I have a plan. You know it is hard for 
a man to get into Lasell, and naturally you 
would not be on any of the calling lists, so 



LASELL LEAVES 



131 



I will give you a pass-port which will make 
you welcome at that guarded fort of learn- 
ing. Here it is. Now begone! Take 
care how you behave when you get there!" 

The night was cloudy when Washington 
arrived at Auburndale. The moon was pale, 
and the stars were scarcely visible; but af- 
.ter asking the direction in which the school 
lay, and wishing sincerely that it were day, 
he climbed the hill leading to the seminary, 
guided by the many bright lights in the win- 
dows. While on the way, the town clock 
struck half past nine and, I am happy to say, 
Washington's first impression of our prompt- 
ness was a good one, for at half past nine the 
bell is a sign for all lights to be out, and im- 
mediately at the peal of this bell, all was 
dark at Lasell. "Well !" he said, "I hope 
everyone has not gone to bed." He gave 
up his pass-port in the hall, and an- 
nounced that he had come to call, to inspect 
the school. To call at such a late hour was 
shocking; but he was forgiven, for he had 
striven to get here earlier, and besides, as 
soon as our preceptress saw him she recog- 
nized him by his portrait, which we all know. 
Without any show of formality he was taken 
to his room, and soon, very soon, for he was 
tired after having traveled such a long dis- 
tance, was asleep. 

He awakened suddenly with a start. 
Was an old-time army attacking him? 
What was the din? Where had he been? 
Then, his presence of mind being strong, he 
realized that it was the rising gong, and 
got up the moment he heard it, just as we all 
do on the first morning after our arrival at 
Lasell. Not knowing our customs and 

fearing that he would be late, he was in front 
of his plate in the dining-room at exactly half 
past seven. I am sorry to say that eleven 
girls stared at him when they came in, but 
not one blushed, for each had had nerve- 
training and could control her circulation by 



relaxation. He did, however, look queer 
in his old fashioned gear, as we all came in — 
I felt sorry for him. There he sat, I can 
see him yet, over at the German table. No 
one seemed to know what to talk about, ex- 
cept on the subjects of cherry-trees and 
hatchets, and crossing the Delaware and ly- 
ing — and that in German. But he was po- 
lite, in spite of his plight. 

That day, to pleasantly pass the time away, 
he visited a few of the classes. He first 
went to senior lit., which amused him a bit, 
when he learned all about ancient history, 
and the wonderful mystery with which the 
seniors surround it. He never had known 
before that Abraham was a descendant of 
Moses. Even if one is a Washington, one 
always has something to learn. He went 
also to French and heard L'Aiglon. Such 
translations as we had! Not a single one 
bad, hence no girl made sad. The drill was 
fine. Each line was as straight as if marked 
by a tape. Oh — I nearly forgot to state, 
that no one came to chapel late, because — 
well — we didn't have steak at lunch. Mr. 
Washington remarked on the quiet manners 
of all of the young ladies. He thought that 
they were just as dignified as the girls of 
his day, which, really, was to us quite a com- 
pliment. He entered into the spirit of the 
nerve-training class with zeal, and no girl 
present seemed to feel any desire to giggle, 
queer as that may seem. 

Oh, can't you imagine the rest ? . . . I 
really think it best. 



After the dinner and the speeches were 
over, we went into the gymnasium and 
danced. The evening was throughout a 
very pleasant one. 

March 2. — Prof. Edward S. Morse talked 
to us upon Japanese Home Decoration. 
Speaking of the interior furnishing of a Jap- 
anese home, he said that the floors are cov- 



132 



LASELL LEAVES 



ered with mats which are of the same size all 
over Japan, and that screens decorated with 
most artistic designs, serve for partitions. 
There is in a room only one picture on the 
wall at a time. After a month or two, this 
is taken down and another one put in its 
place, the Japanese custom being - thus in 
strong contrast to our less defensible fash- 
ion of having a great number of pictures 
displayed at once, and all the time, upon our 
walls. On the floor, or on a stand below and 
in front of this picture is a vase in front of 
which is the seat of honor. Among other 
things Prof. Morse said that although we 
can teach the Japanese a great deal, they can 
with equally beneficial results give us les- 
sons in the art of home decoration. The 
lecture was full of interest. 

March 7. — We had the pleasure of hear- 
ing on this afternoon Mrs. Alice Gordon 
Gulick, who gave us an interesting talk on 
her work in Spain during the last few years. 
Mrs. Gulick, who, by the way, is an old La- 
sell girl, has done a great deal toward giv- 
ing Spanish girls an opportunity of obtain- 
ing an education, for until recent years it 
was in Spain thought unnecessary, nay, even 
wrong, for girls to have any learning at all. 
The fact that we were sorry the talk was so 
short, is enough to show with what great 

pleasure we listened to it. 

m » 

Marriages. 

— Katharine McDowell to Henry Grant 
Rowe, on Saturday, February 16, at Medina, 
Ohio. 

— Married on Saturday, February 23, 
Mabel Cameron Currie, class of ('99), to 
Mr. Ebenezer Hill, Jr. At home after May 

15, Norwalk, Conn. 

_ — . — » ♦ 

- — Every man's task is his life preserver. 
The conviction that his work is dear to God, 
and cannot be spared, defends him. — Emer- 
son. 



The Midwinter Lasell Reunion. 



THE New England Lasell Reunion was 
held on February 18th, Monday, and 
was chosen because thus more of the teach- 
ers of the seminary would be able to attend. 
And so it proved. The gathering took place 
at the Vendome, and the guests numbered 
about seventy. There was first of all at 
2.30 a pleasant program of readings and 
music, by Mrs. Blanche C. Martin and Miss 
Evangeline Winn, respectively, followed by 
a talk from Principal Bragdon, whose pres- 
ence added the finishing touch to the re- 
union, his absence from home during the 
winter having repeatedly kept him from at- 
tending these annual gatherings of his old 
pupils and teachers. His speech, after a 
few preliminary and characteristic pleas- 
antries, dwelt upon the future of Lasell, and 
its possible endowment. It was, he said, his 
dearest wish for the school that it should be 
in the hands of its own alumnse, conducted in 
accordance with its long avowed principles, 
and secured from any possibility of embar- 
rassment, by a liberal endowment. This he 
trusted would eventually come to pass, and 
then his ambition for Lasell would be satis- 
fied, and the future of the dear old school 
assured. He emphasized the fine character 
of the work done there, and the splendid 
promise for coming days. 

Following this came the formal reception 
of the guests by Miss Carpenter, Miss Blais- 
dell, Mrs. Martin and Miss Loud. 

The refreshments took the shape of an 
afternoon tea this time, which allowed a freer 
intermingling of those present, with much 
more satisfactory renewal of old acquaint- 
ance and forming of new than the more 
formal way of serving dainties to a seated 
company allows. Miss Packard, Miss Ken- 
drick, Miss Austin and Miss Witherbee filled 
the cups with steaming chocolate, tea or cof- 



LASELL LEAVES 



133 



fee, as desired, and quick hands passed sand- 
wiches, wafers and cakes around, while to 
those who preferred ices to hot beverages, 
Miss Ransom ministered. 

The unavoidable absence of Mrs. Parker, 
President of the Association of Alumnae, was 
regretted by all. The matters pertaining to 
arrangements were in the capable hands of 
Miss Jennie Macmillan, '82, and Miss Elise 
Scott, '99, and were admirably managed. 
The following were present : 

Dr. C. C. Bragdon, '74-1901, Auburndale, Mass. 
Miss Caroline Carpenter, '73-1901, Auburndale, Mass. 
Miss Angeline C. Blaisdell, '67, Auburndale, Mass. 
Miss Jessie J. Macmillan, '82, 305 Central Street, 

Auburndale, Mass. 
Miss Helen Rishell, '99, 20 Turner Street, Newton- 

ville, Mass. 
Mrs. Emma Fernald Brock, West End, Maiden, 

Mass. 
Mrs. Blanche C. Martin, Waltham, Mass. 
Miss Nellie S. Wilson, Nahant, Mass. 
Miss Martha E. Avery, '96, Plymouth, Mass. 
Miss Sara Hayden, '95, East Hartford, Conn. 
Mrs. Jennie Arnold Felt, '93, 71 Main Street, Pea- 
body, Mass. 
Miss Grace E. Loud, '95, 201 Linden Street, Everett, 

Mass. 
Miss Annie F. Cushing, '96, Foxcroft, Maine. 
Mrs. Blanche Busell Hofmann, Somerville, Mass. 
Miss Emma F. Cleaves, '99, Rockport, Mass. 
Miss Edith F. Moulton, '99, 10 Mall Street, Salem, 

Mass. 
Miss Ida F. Trowbridge, South Framingham, Mass. 
Miss Marion A. Safford, Sharon, Mass. 
Mrs. Gertrude Watson Linscott, '99, Woburn, Mass. 
Mrs. Jennie Myrick Gibbs, '98, Jamaica Plain, Mass. 
Mrs. Abbie Hills Holbrook, '57, 77 Arlington Street, 

Newton, Mass. 
Mrs. Addie Rich Treadwell, 50 York Terrace, 

Brookline, Mass. 
Miss Florence E. Tower, Auburndale, Mass. 
Miss Lillie R. Potter, 12 Union Park, Boston, Mass. 
Mrs. Mira Sweet Hall, Auburndale, Mass. _ 
Mrs. Augusta Damon Nickerson, Newton Highlands, 

Mass. 
Mrs. Carrie Kendig Kellogg, '79, 86 Vernon Street, 

Brookline, Mass. 
Miss Jessie M. Gaskill. '93, Woonsocket, R. I. 
Mrs. Annie Kendig Peirce, '80, 34 Centre Street, 

Brookline, Mass. 
Miss Irene G. Sanford, '79, United States Hotel, 

Boston, Mass. 
Mrs. Rosa Best Pike, 8 Gaylord Street, Dorchester, 

Mass. 
Mrs. Lizzie Burnham Low, '87, Essex, Mass. 
Miss Edith T. Grant, '98, Beresford Hotel, New 

York, N. Y. 
Miss Louise W. Richards, '97, Weymouth, Mass. 
Mrs. Alma Widstrand Rogers, '73, Ruthven Street, 

Roxbury, Mass. 
Mrs. Inez Bragg Johnson, 28 Wigglesworth Street, 

East Somerville, Mass. 
Mrs. Carrie Wallace Hussey, '82, Rochester, N. H. 



Mrs. 
Miss 

Mrs. 

Mrs. 

Mrs. 

Mrs. 

Miss 
Mrs. 

Mrs. 

Mrs. 

Mrs. 
Miss 
Mrs. 

Miss 

Miss 
Miss 
Miss 

Miss 

Miss 
Miss 
Mrs. 

Miss 

Mrs. 
Mrs. 

Miss 
Miss 
Mrs. 

Prof. 

Miss 
Miss 
Miss 

Miss 
Miss 
Miss 



Grace Fribley Pennell, Portland, Me. 
Martha B. Lucas, '60, 32 St. Stephen Street, 
Boston, Mass. 

Ella Richardson Cushing, '73, 158 West New- 
ton Street, Boston, Mass. 

Marietta Rose Green, '86, 22 Lincoln Street, 
Newton Highlands, Mass. 

Adelaide Sears Gilman, '57, 9 Baldwin Street, 
Newton, Mass. 

Sadie Perkins Johnson, 62 Harvard avenue, 
Hyde Park, Mass. 
A. Elizabeth Mann, Randolph, Mass. 
Mary Hathaway Farnham, '88, 11 Kearsage 
avenue, Roxbury, Mass. 

Mary Cole Seaver, 16 Homestead Street, Rox- 
bury, Mass. 

Bessie Sayford Bacon, 52 Hyde avenue, New- 
ton, Mass. 

Mary Colby Walworth, Newton Centre, Mass. 
Rosamond Ridgaway Best, Maiden, Mass. 
Myrtle Davis Gage, '97, Copley Square Hotel, 
Boston, Mass. 

Mary C. Penniman, '58, 5 Alverton Street, Ja- 
maica Plain, Mass. 

C. A. K. Bancroft, '57, Wellesley Hills, Mass. 
Gertrude May, 9 Laurel avenue, Auburn, Me. 
Mary B. Vance, '99, 1648 Mass. Avenue, Cam- 
bridge, Mass. 

Elizabeth Starks, 10 Durham Street, Boston, 
Mass. 

Clementina Butler, Newton Centre, Mass. 
Evangeline Winn, Northboro, Mass. 
Lottie Hardy James, 28 Macon Avenue, Haver- 
hill, Mass. 

Bertha L. Childs, 469 Haverhill Street, 
Lawrence, Mass. 

Margaret Noyes Otis, Andover, Mass. 
Emma Sears May, '57, 272 Centre Street, New- 
ton, Mass. 

Mary P. Witherbee, '92, Auburndale, Mass. 
Clara M. Austin, Auburndale, Mass. 
Louie Best Cummock, 62 Bay State Road, Bos- 
ton, Mass. 

G. M. Winslow, Auburndale, Mass. 
Mary L. Nutt, Auburndale, Mass. 
A. Ethel Johnson, '99, Hallowell, Maine. 
Ruth Rishell, '99, 20 Turner Street, Newton- 
ville, Mass. 

Eliza H. Kendrick, Auburndale, Mass. 
Lillian M. Packard, '83, South Boston, Mass. 
Martha E. Ransom, Auburndale, Mass. 



PASSED AWAY. 

— Amy Hall Smith died recently at her 
home in Ware, Massachusetts. We sympa- 
thize with her bereaved husband and little 
ones. 



— Swift, speedy time, feathered with fly- 
ing hours. — Daniel. 

— Every evil to which we do not suc- 
cumb is a benefactor. We gain the strength 
of the temptation we resist. — R. W. Emer- 
son. 



134 LASELL LEAVES 

Highest Type of Girl. crossed. Young women who are fond of 
Julia Ward Howe is convinced that the outdoor sports, who can do as well as men 
representative 20th century girl will be the numerous things that in the past men alone 
highest type of girl the world has yet seen, did, and women who are successful in corn- 
In "Success," however, she sounds a warn- peting with men in the business or profes- 
ing as to the cultivation of manners, observ- sional world, exult in the power and free- 
ing that in this respect we have not advanced dom which their mothers did not have, 
during the last century. Abroad we are Mrs. Howe concludes with the statement 
acquiring the reputation of being the best that the progressive women are in the dan- 
dressed people in the world, but about our ger of offending good manners by giving 
manners, which are even more important their exultation and their own personality 
than dress, there is often a polite but signifi- too great emphasis. Some of them feel that 
cant silence. their study, work or play is too engrossing to 
It is Mrs. Howe's belief that our educa- give them time for the delicate amenities and 
tional system should take more account of little niceties of social life that in her youth 
deportment, which is in a large measure ex- wer e held in such high esteem. 

pressive of what we represent. The social -. , — 

atmosphere is warmed by the enthusiasm of CONTENTMENT, 

youth. We admire the vitality of the healthy It ain't no use to grumble and complain; 

girl, but when youth becomes forgetful of Jt ' s J ust as chea P and eas y t0 rejoice; 

, . ,. , . . r ,1 ,ii- When God sorts out the weather and sends rain, 

the feelings and opinions of others, the line w , y> rain>s my choice 

between good manners and bad manners is —James Whitcomb Riley. 

Business Established 1817. 



JOHN H. PRAY & SONS GO. 

Wholesale and retail dealers in 

CARPETS a-ixjd RUGS. 

of both Foreign and Domestic Manufacture; also 

Curtains, Draperies, Portieres *=£&■ Upholstery Fabrics 

^-PRICES ALWAYS MODERATE.^ 



J-OIKIsr IE3L JPtt-ATZT & SOILTS CO., 

Oldest and Largest Carpet House in Jfow England. 

PRAY BUILDING, Opposite Boylston St. 

6 5 8 WASHIN6T0N STREET, BOSTON. 6 5 8 



LASELL LEAVES 



135 




— In all the Universities of France, there 
are no papers, no glee clubs, no fraternities, 
no athletics, and no commencement exer- 
cises. — Ex. 

— The Converse Concept has an article 
entitled, "True Friendship" that is well 
worth reading. 

— The exchanges received this month are : 
The Classic, The Adelphian, The K. H. S. 
Myth, High School Gleaner, The Polytech- 
nic, The College Rambler, Newton High 
School Review, The Dean Megaphone, The 
High School Bulletin, The Mount Hol- 



yoke, The Cresset, The Bowdoin Quill, and 
the University Beacon. 

m m 

The following have been favored with calls 
from members of their families : Misses 
Blague, Woodbury, Clokey, Hazleton, Mc- 
Connell, Upham, Ordway, Bowers, George, 
Tarbox, DeGroff, Brewer, B. Hayden, Al- 
bright; Curtis, Taylor, Rising, Rogers, Ben- 
nett, Skinner, Patterson, Talcott. 

Former pupils — Ethel Johnson, Emma 
Cleaves, Evangeline Winn, Florence Roby, 
Edith Tidd, Sara Hayden, Florence Thomp- 
son, Ella Cotton, Josephine Milliken, Edith 
Grant, Olive Smith, Grace Richardson, Mrs. 
Jennie Myrick Gibbs, Mrs. Ella Brightman 
Ricketson, Mrs. Myrtle Davis Gage. 

m m 

— "Only those who deserve happiness 
find it." 

— Our friends tell us of our virtues, but 
our enemies, who are even kinder, tell us of 
our faults. 



THE BEST IS NONE TOO GOOD 
FOR A LASELL GIRL. 




WE have been chosen to make, for MEMBERS OF THE CLASS OF 1901, the BEST 
and MOST ARTISTIC PHOTOGRAPHS they have ever had. 

Members of other classes will be given a VERY LOW SCHOOL RATE upon our 
HIGH ART PRODUCTIONS. 

21 WEST STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 



136 



LASELL LEAVES 



Foot Anatomy, 

Is a branch of science that the skilled shoe 
maker has to thoroughly master. The 
makers of 




have, after years of experience, acquired a 
knowledge enabling them to produce shoes 
that have a snug, glove-like fit at the heel, 
ankle and instep, seldom found even in the 
finest custom-made shoes, and they reveal a 
style and individuality of their own which all 
good dressers appreciate. 

(Forty styles in all Leathers.) 



Always 



S3.50 



Pair. 



Shepard, Norwell & Co., 

Winter Street, Boston. 



Foreign Shirtings for Waists 



BY THE YARD. 



Keep Manufacturing Co. 

Makers of Keep's Shirts. 15« Tremont St., Boston. 

FIRST NATIONAL. BANK 

OF WEST NEWTON, MASS. 

James H. Nickerson, Pies. A. R. Mitchell, Vice-Pres. 

Edward P. Hatch, Cashier. 

General Banking, Collection and Exchange. 
Capital, $100,000. 

Business hours dally, 8.30 to 12 a. m. and 1 to 3 p. m. 
Saturdays, 8.30 a. m. to 12 m. Safe deposit boxes to rent in 
new fli - e and burglar proof vault. 

ELLIOT W. KEYES 



TAYLOR BLOCK, 



AUBURNDALE. 



Apothecary. 



Drugs, Medicines and Toilet Articles. 
California Perfumes. Confections. 



Rockwell awd Churchill. 



printers 

THIRTY-NINE AROH 8TREET, 
BOSTON, MASS. 



SCHOOL ANNUALS, 
ANNOUNCEMENTS, 
CATALOGUES. 



PRINTERS Of LASELL CATALOGUE. 



C. F. Hovey & Co. 

33 Summer Street. 
42 Avon Street. 

Boston, Mass. 

Importers of 

Dress Goods, Silks, 
Cloaks, Suits, Laces, 

Underwear, Small Wares. 

Roses, 

Carnations, 

Violets, 

Daffodils, 

Forget-me-not, 

Lily ofthe Valley 

Auburndale, Mass. 
Telephone. 

Mrs. C. JET. HALL, 

DRESSMAKER. 

Work done at reasonable prioes. 

Special rates te students. 

490 AUBURN STREET, AUBURNDALE. 

C. RAYMOND di LTJCCI, 

CHOICE FRUITS, CANDY, NUTS, ETC. 

CIGARS and TOBACCO. 
365 AUBURN STREET, corner ASS STREE1 
AUBURNDALE, MASS. 

B. S. COLE 




MUTTON, LAMB, VEAL, 

POULTRY and GAME 

WHOLE SALE AND RE TAIL. 

Stalls 13 and 15, Faneuil Hall Market, Boston. 

Telephone connection. 

George W. Kimball & Co., 

Wholesale and retail dealers In 

Poultry, Game, Beef, Mutton, Lamb and Yeal. 

Basement, No. 32a North Street, opposite Merchants' 
Row, Boston. 

Telephone 927 Haymarket. 
Howard M. Smith. Albert P. Smith. 

SMITH BROTHERS. 

(Successors to Geo. H. Phil brook & Co.) 

Butter, Cheese, Eg^g-s 

Stalls No. 2 aud 4, 
Faneuil Hall Market, Boston, Mass. 

Telephone, Haymarket 884. 



LASELL LEAVES 



137 




Blanket Wraps 

For the Nursery. 
For the Sick Room. 
For the Bath. 

For Steamer Traveling. 
For the Railway Carriage. 
For Yachting. 
For Men, Women, Children and the 
Baby, $2.75 to $35, with Hood and 
Girdle complete. 



Ladies' Shirt and Golf Waists, 
$5.00 to $20.00. 

From Madras, Oxfords, Cheviot, French 
Percales, English and French Flannels, 
Silk and Moire Poplin. 



A Special Department for 

Ladies' Golf Waists, 
Bicycle and Golf Skirts, 
Entire Golfing Suits. 

GOLF CLUBS, 
GOLF BALLS and 
CADDY BAGS. 




NOYES BEOS. 

Washington and Summer Streets, 

BOSTON, Mass., U. S. A. 



You should call or send for sample of 

King's Royal Bond. 



Most bond papers as good sell for about double the 
price of this. 

Per Quire Five Quires 

l-tr'^ 120 Sheets, ) <t y 



25 Envelopes 



.}2JC 



100 Envelopes, 



This comes in three colors — white, azure and ceru- 
lean blue — and in the very latest fashionable sizes. 

f r\r\ D l/ii-iro Art Stationer and Engraver. 

UcUi Di i\lng| 250 Boylston St., Boston, Mass. 

Calling Cards and Die Stamping a specialty. 



SHOES FOR 
YOUNG LADIES. 

Newest Shapes. Newest Styles for Gym- 
nasium, Tennis, Walking and Dress. 

WE GIVE TEN PER CENT. DISCOUNT 
TO ill LJLSELL STUDENTS. 

THE HENR Y H. 
TUTTLE CO., 

Cor. WASHINGTON and WINTER STS., 
BOSTON. 



DAVIS, CHAPIN CO. 

J. A. BARKER, President. 

Commission Merchants and Wholesale 
Dealers in Foreign and Domestic 

Fruits and Produce. 

83 and 85 Faneuil Hall Market, 

Cellar 15 South Side, 

Boston, Mass. 

Telephone Haymarket 777. 



MILLS & DEERING, 

Receivers and Dealers in Fine Grades of 

BUTTER 

AND STRICTLY FRESH EGGS. 



CHAS. W. HICGINS, 

Choice Family Groceries. 

Teas, Coffees, Spices, Canned Goods, Fancy 
Crackers, Fruit, Nuts and Confections. 

Davis Block, 417 Auburn St., Auburn dale. 



138 



LASELL LEAVES 



JOSHUA THORNDIKE. 



CHAS. W. SPEAR 



JOSHUA THORNDIKE & CO. 



DEALERS IN 



MUTTON, LAMB and VEAL 

Stalls 3 and 5 New Faneuil Hall Market, 
BOSTON, MASS. 

Edward E. Babb & Co. 

25 Arch St., Boston, Mass. 

Dealers in 

SCHOOL BOOKS and SCHOOL SUPPLIES 

D. A. HOWE 

273 MAIN STREET, WORCESTER, MASS. 

WHOLESALE GROCER. 

Gallons Canned Goods of all kinds and of the best 
quality a specialty. Teas and Coffees. 



Dr. GEORGE A. BATES, 

TAYLOR BLOCK, AUBURNDALE. 

DENTIST. 

Office hours. — Mondays, Wednesdays, Thursdays 
and Saturdays, 8 a. m. to 4 p. tn. 



COTRELL I LEONARD, 

ALBANY, N. Y. 

MAKERS OP 

CAPS, GOWNS and HOODS 

to the American Universities and to 
Lasell Seminary. Illustrated Man 
ual, Samples, etc., upon application 



I.egPH g-^ 

__ v B05T0NWASs i vk^^®); / ( 

^ythu FARMjlgw 





7fWOt MA«« 



FINEST ROAD-BED ON THE CONTINENT. 



Boston and Albany Railroad. 



THROUGH CAR SERVICE IN EFFECT SEPTEMBER 20, 1900. 



No. 7 — Leaves Boston at 8.30 a. m. except Sunday. Wagner buffet drawing-room car, Boston to Albany. 
No. 15 — Leaves Boston at 10.45 a. m. daily. Wagner vestibuled buffet library-smoking car and vestibuled 

sleeping cars. Boston to Chicago, via L. S. & M. S. R. R. to St. Louis via Big Four 

Route. Dining car service. 
No. 19 — Leaves Boston at 2.00 p. m. daily. The North Shore Special Wagner buffet vestibuled sleeping 

cars, Boston to Cleveland and Chicago. ) 

No. 23 — Leaves Boston at 3.30 p. m. except Sunday. Wagner buffet vestibuled 'sleeping cars, Boston to 

Niagara Falls. Tourist sleeping car Boston to Chicago. 
No. 37 — Leaves Boston at 6.00 p. m. daily. Wagner vestibuled sleeping car, Boston to Cleveland and 

Cincinnati via L. S. & M. S. R. R. ; also Wagner vestibuled sleeping car, Boston to Detroit 

and Chicago via M. C. R. R. 
No. 63 — Leaves Boston at 11.00 p. m., except Saturday. Wagner sleeping car, Boston to Albany, arriv- 
ing at 7.57 a. m. 
For information, maps, time-tables, tickets and accommodations in drawing-room and sleeping cars, 
apply to agents of Boston & Albany Railroad at its several stations. 

J. L. WHITE, City Pass, and Ticket Agent, or to A. S. HANSON, Gen. Pass. Agent. 

The only first-class through line from New England to the West. 



City Ticket Office, 366 Washington St., Boston 



LASELL LEAVES 



139 




BONBONS 
CHOCOLATES 

Delicious Ice Crezvrr) Soda. 
45 TRBMONT STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 

PLEASE FORWARD GOODS BY 

JOHNSON & KEYES EXPRESS CO. 

AUBURNDALE AND BOSTON EXPRESS. 

Offices: 34 Court Sq., 77 Kingston, 105 Arch Streets 
BOSTON. 

WAUWINET FARM. 

COMMONWEALTH AVE. AND VALENTINE ST., 

WEST NEWTON, MASS. 
All interested in a modern Dairy are invited to visit the Farm. 



DEALER EN 

PROVISIONS. 

Corner Auburn and Lexington Streets, 

_Auburndale, Mass. 



Established 1830 

Alfred Mudge & Son 
PRINTERS 

24 Franklin Street, Boston 

CLASS PRINTING 
A SPECIALTY 



.Andrew J. Lloyd <fe Co. 
OPTICIANS 

DOWN-TOWN-323 Washington St., opp. Old South Church. 

BACK BAY-310 Bojlston St., opp. Arlington St. 

Bring your prescriptions for Eyeglasses and Spectacles to us. 
A complete line of Photographic Goods always in stock. The 
best place in Boston to have your developing and printing 
done. Send for our price list. 



Francis Bachelder. 



F. S. Snyder 



rancis Batchelder 




Beef, Pork, Mutton, Veal, Poultry, 

Game, Hams, Bacon, Lard, Butter, 

Cheese, Eggs, Cream, etc. 



Provisions and Produce 



Proprietors of CAPITOL CREAMERIES, 

Central Station, Montpelier, Vt. 



Poultry and Egg House, 

Fenton, Michigan. 



Smoke Houses, Sausage Factory, Ham Cooking Fac- 
tory, Cold Storage, etc., 55, 57, 59, 61 and 63 
Blackstone Street, 

Boston, Mass. 



G. L. Lawrence. f. B. Eastman. 

J. P. LAWRENCE & CO., 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

Poultry, T^Tild Game. 

Goods for Shipping a Specialty. 

30 FANEUIL HALL MARKET, BOSTON. 

Telephone, Haymarket 919. 



>V<lfiiujs Ac €rilt>ert, 

OPTICIANS. 

]\T ANUFACTURERS of Spectacles and Eye Glasses, and Im- 
ivx porters of Opera, Field and Marine Glasses and Optical 
Goods of every description. Oculists' prescription work a 
specialty. 

165 Tremont Street, Boston. 



140 



LASELL LEAVES 



WOODLAND PARK HOTEL 

AUBURNDALE, MASS. 

Five minutes' walk from Lasell. Open all the year. 
CHAS C. BUTLER. 

HENRY W. GOODWIN, 

75-80 Broad Street, Boston, Mass. 

BRYANT & MAY'S 

LONDON PARLOUR MATCHES- 



Ppeiepped Stock 

MOCHA AND JAVA 

COppEE. 

THE HIGHEST GRADE OF BLENDED COFFEE. 

ROASTED AND PACKED BY 

Martin L. Hall & Co., 

Boston, Mass. 

Jr WOODWARD 

FISH, OYSTERS, EGGS, CANNED GOODS, 
VEGETABLES, ETC. 

Co?. Auburn and Ash Sts., Auburndale, Mass. 



BARLOW'S ICE CREAM. 

J. B. SANDERSON, Proprietor. 

Telephone 261-3. WEST NEWTON, MASS. 

Catering in all its branches at reasonable prices. 



BEEF, PORK, LARD, HAMS, BACON, 
PIGS' FEET and TRIPE. 



STURTEVANT & HALEY 
BEEF and SUPPLY CO. 

38 and 40 Faneuil Hall Market, 

BOSTON, MASS. 

TALLOW, STEARINE, 
FINE OLEO, OIL, SCRAP, Etc 



CHARLES F. HATHAWAY, 

MANUFACTURING BAKER. 



Crackers, Biscuit, Bread, Cake and Pastry. Wholesale 
jobber of Kennedy's Celebrated Crackers. Hathaway's 
original Home-made Cream Bread, best in the world, 
kept by all leading grocers. 

Factories: 1906 Mass. Ave., Cambridge. 
769 Main Street, Waltham. 



G. D. Harvey. A. C. Farley. W. T. Farley. 

Farley, Harvey «8c Co. 

Importers and Jobbers of 

I>I»y CrOOdls. 

141 to 149 ESSEX STREET, BOSTON. 



THIS SPACE IS PAID FOR 



BY A FRIEND. 



W. H. PRIOR. 



C. A. PRIOR 



PRIOR BROS. 

Successors to Wra. Prior, Jr., & Co. 
Wholesale and retail dealers in all kinds of 

Ocean, Lake and River Fish, Oysters and Clams 

127 and 129 Faneuil Sail Market, Boston, Mass. 

Telephone, 673 Haymarket. 

3ST©wtoa Ice Q@mpamy. 

T/^pT 1 sold by us is cut from Longfellow's Pond, Wellesley 
J-V^J-L j Hills. Water from pond is used in Wellesley public 
service. The Newton Ice Co. is prepared to furnish a first 
class quality of POND ICE iu West Newton, Newtou- 
ville, Auburndale, Newton Lower Falls and Wellesley Hills. 

MILLER & HATCH, Props. 

P. O. Address, Newton Lower Falls. 



A Hardware Store for a hundred years. 

Bnrditt & Williams 

Dealers in 

Builders' and General Hardware 
Supplies, Tools and Cutlery. 

20 DOCK SQ., BOSTON. 



LASELL LEAVES 



141 



^ COLLEGE 



Will always find at our stove the LATEST 

CONCEITS IN STATIONERY as well as the other 

necessaries for her college work. 

Economical prices prevail. 



THORP & MARTIM CO. 

FINE STATIONERY SHOP. 

12 MILK STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 

Shreve, Crump & Low Co. 

147 Tremont S^., Boston. 

JEWELERS and SILVERSMITHS, 



STATIONERY, CLASS and SOCIETY PINS. 

Designs submitted and estimates furnished. 



Tbe Knickerbocker 5boe 




For 
Girls. 

Enamel 
Oxfords 
for 
Spring. 



Everything in Srjoe?, $3.50. 

E. W. Burt & Co. 

.... 40 West Street. 



Vassar College Song Book 

This collection contains ninety songs which belong 
distinctively to the musical life of a young lady's 
seminary, and are equally useful and available for 
individual or glee clubs for women's voices. Songs of 
this character are not plentiful, and this volume 
should be in possession of every college girl. Price 
$1.25. 

We will send one or more sample copies at the 
rate of $1.00 each. 

Scbirrrjer's A\usic Store 

Ttje Boston /"Vusic Co. 
26 West Street, Boston, A\&ss. 



Cobb, Aldrich & Co. 



Corner of Washington and Kneeland Streets, Boston. 



ALWAYS have in stock 

THE NICEST assortment of 



CRYSTALLIZED VIOLETS. 
All kinds of French Fruits, Glaces, 
Stuffed Prunes, Salted Almonds, 
Pecans and Peanuts, Violet Sachet, 
Bonbonnierres, French Bonbons, Fancy 
Chocolates, Nougatines, Marshmallow, 
Opera Caramels, etc. 



CONFECTIONS 

OF THEIR OWN MANUFACTURE 

TO BE FOUND ANYWHERE 



FANCY CRACKERS 

OF EVERT 
DESCRIPTION. 



Also a full line of Stuffed Olives, Pim-Olas, Fancy Pickles, 
Preserves and Condiments especially adapted to Dinner and Evening Parties 



CATALOGUE FORWARDED UPON APPLICATION. 



142 



LASELL LEAVES 



THE DAYLIGHT STORE 



provides every 
convenience 

iiii ii iiii m i i^ — — — am — — ■ — —— — for satiftfac- 

tory shopping — parlor for reading, writiug and resting — postoffice — telegraph office — safety eleva- 
tors running to basement and upper Moors — every corner thoroughly lighted and ventilated. 
While our effort is to bring an increasing number of customers each day to the various 
departments, yet our desire is to have every purchase and the detail of every transaction so 
conducted by our employees that a feeling of entire satisfaction will accompany each sale. 
Ladies' Outer Garments, Corsets, Underwear and Shoes are prominent everyday features 
of our store. 




HRIST & CO., 



WINTER AND WASHINGTON 
STREETS, BOSTON, 



THE NEW SCALE 

HALLETT & DAVIS 
PIANOS. 

The recognized standard of the musical world. We 
have no hesitancy in saying that our Piano as made 
today is as near a perfect instrument as is possible to 
manufacture. You should try and hear the New Scale 
Hallett & Davis if you are interested in a beautiful 
toned piano. We can surprise you in price, quality 
and tone. 

Established 60 Years. 179 TREMONT STREET. 



C. W. Davidson, Pres. 
Newtonville. 



F. F. Davidson, Treas. 
Auburndale. 



THOMAS LONG COMPANY, 

77 Summer St., Boston. 

GOLDSMITHS AND SILVERSMITHS. 

3pecial designs always in stock. 

Newest ideas in Jewelry, Sterling Silver, Cut Glass, 
Umbrellas and Pocket-books. 
Repairing a specialty. 
Makers of Class and Society Pins and Golf Prizes. 



Foreign Shirtings for Waists 

BY THE YARD. 



Keep Manufacturing Co. 



Makers of Keep's Shirts. 



156 Tremont St., Boston. 



H. B. Thayer 

NEWEST FASHIONS IN SHOES. 

Special discount to students. 
144 TREMONT STREET, BOSTON. 



O 



DD THINGS. 



^-^ Brooches, 

J§£ Hat Pins, 

Buckles, 
Posters, 
Steins, 
Flags. 

387 BSot n Sai. St " BENT & BUSH. 



O'flEIbh'S 

6th Avenue 20 to 2 1st St., tt. Y. 

Iifl VlDfl 

Straight Front 

CORSETS. 

The Best Product of American Skill, Sur- 
passing in Wearing Qualities and Fit, and 
equalling in finish the best Imported 
Gored Corset sold in New York, and 

Fifty per cent. 
Cheaper 117 Price* 

They are Strictly Handmade, French 
Gored, Bias Cut and all Whalebone, and 
we guarantee every pair to give entire 
satisfaction, both as to fit and wearing 
qualities. 



l^SCLL £EAVE5 



n 



DUX FEniNA FACTI." 



VOL. XXVI 



Lasell Seminary, Auburndale, Mass., April, 1901. 



Number 7 



Published monthly during the School year by the Lasell Publishing Association. 



MARINETTE RAMSDELL, '02. 

Local Editor. 
LENA ARMSTRONG. 



Editor-in-chief. 
NELL DAVIS JONES, '03. 

Associate Editors. 
FONNIE E. DAVIS. 

Subscription Agent. 
DORA E- CLARK. 



EVA L. CHANDLER, '04. 



Exchanoe Editor. 
M. BELL CtOKEY, '02. 



Business Manager. 
ETHLYN F. BARBER, '01. 



Asst. Business Manager. 
JOANNA F. DEERING, '02. 



TERMS, in Advance: One copy, one year (incl uding Postage), $1.00. Single copies, 15 cents. 







ADVERTISING RAHTE-S. 








SPACE. 


3 months 


6 months 


9 months 


SPACE. 


3 months 


6 months 


9 months 


1-8 Column, .... 
1-6 " .... 
1-4 " .... 


$2.00 
3.00 
4.00 


$3.75 
5.00 
6.50 


$5.00 
6.50 
9.00 


1-2 Column 

3-4 " .... 
1 " .... 


$6.50 

9.00 

12.00 


$11.00 
15.00 
19.00 


$15.00 
20.00 
25.00 


The Editors will be glad to receive from the students and Alumnae any communications and items of 
interest to the school. 



Editorials. 



WHAT makes the school, the seminary, 
the college? We can not say the 
teachers alone; it is largely the students. 
We sometimes say of a school, "I do not like 
its spirit," but do we realize in regard to our 
own school that we students help each in her 
measure, to make it what it is? Should 
we not make this a personal matter, and see 
whether we ourselves are lacking in the 
proper interest which this question ought to 
call out ? We make each of us our own lit- 
tle circle, of friends, and in this circle, 
chiefly, we live and enjoy our school year; 
but is this binding us to our friends alone, 
or to the school as well? We need not 



necessarily break up these pleasant little 
cliques, but we should remember that we 
have a duty to others as well. Let us, then, 
be less exclusive in our social spirit. Again 
in our daily work we do much to create a 
good spirit in the school simply by doing our 
best, and not allowing our interest to lag, 
and our standards to grow less worthy. 
Outside this matter of class work, too, we 
have still other responsibilities. Let us not 
in any way, nor regarding any thing, lower 
the standard of our school by any thought- 
less or reckless conduct, but keep it so high 
that it may rather stimulate in all the desire 
to make it yet higher. Now, when there 



144 



LASELL leaves 



comes to us from this or that source such 
criticism as denotes dissatisfaction with our 
paper, it is surely time to awake to the neces- 
sities of the case. All kindly criticisms 
and friendly suggestions will be very gladly 
accepted by the editors; but it must be re- 
membered that editors alone can do little, 
though with the help of all, much can be ac- 
complished. Come, girls, let us have your 
ideas, and see your school spirit, in this mat- 
ter, of what sort it is, the true and loyal, or 
the indifferent and caviling. 

m » 

WE are very much indebted to Miss 
Austin's table for the very pleasant 
time they gave us a few weeks ago. May 
it be the first of a series of such impromptu 
gatherings. Let us make the most of our 
social life here, and take this as a sugges- 
tion, to be followed by other pleasant times 
in the gymnasium. 

m ♦ 

THE cream puffs stuffed with cotton, and 
the coffee sweetened with salt were 
especially delicious on the first of April. 
Could the same person who fooled us at din- 
ner have planned it? 

■ m 

Senior Class of History of Art. 

Oh, we all love History of Art, 

Where we feel so happy and smart; 

For Miss Adams, our teacher, is terribly nice, 
And pictures she brings that really entice. 

Ah, we have it but twice in the week, 
When Clemens and Scott then do speak; 

Tell what they have seen, and what they like best, 

Until the class all feel quite at rest. 

Oh, we really like History of Art, 

But the most our beloved chart; 

For there stand the painters all in a row, 
Italian, French, Spanish and Dutch, you know. 

Oh, these I expect we will keep, 
To remind us of the times twice a week, 
When in room No. 5, we oftener than not, 
Thanked our lucky stars for Clemens and Scott. 



Where Is Lasell? 



Steel pens were first made in 1830. 



A LETTER directed to Auburndale, 
Mass., will reach it, but — let us go to 
Boston — there you'll find a hospital owned 
by the Deaconesses. Lasell is there repre- 
sented by a room which bears its name. In 
the same city there is the Willard Y. Set- 
tlement, the Union Rescue Mission and the 
Hull Street Medical Mission, all of which 
have had gifts and Thanksgiving offerings 
from either the Missionary society or the 
school as a whole. 

Going South we find, at the Allen Normal 
and Industrial school near Thomasville, 
Georgia, a much-needed veranda, built by 
the aid of Lasell. At Claflin University, 
Orangeburg, S. C, a scholar, otherwise too 
poor, is studying there by means of a gift 
from the Missionary society. 

Now let us go to Moradabad, India, and 
there find the school which the Missionary 
society supports, and at Bareilly, the or- 
phange which yearly receives money from 
the same source. 

Harpoot, Turkey, is the next place, and 
from there recently came a package of let- 
ters written by some school girls who 
thanked their kind "care-takers" at Lasell 
for making an education possible for them. 
Among them was Caroline Lasell, an or- 
phan, whom the society adopted many years 

ago. She will soon lose that name, how- 
ever, for she is to be married, and come to 
America to live. 

When the American Church is built at 
Berlin, a Lasell pew will be found there. 

The International Institute for Girls in 
Spain is soon to have a large building, and 
among the rooms named for the different 
colleges who have contributed to its erec- 
tion, a Lasell room will be found. 

If Lasell is at Auburndale, then that lit- 
tle village has very wide dimensions. 
Wherever there is good to be done it is 
there you will find Lasell. 



LASELL LEAVES 



145 



A Typical Lasell Room. 



w 



HAT was my surprise and delight one 
rainy, gloomy Monday (when, in 
spite of bad weather, most of the girls had 
gone to Boston) to find myself at liberty to 
go where I pleased and into any room I 
chose. I wandered aimlessly down the 
hall until a card on one of the doors at- 
tracted my attention — the name it bore be- 
ing Miss Prim, one of the "new girls" who 
had often invited me to come to her room at 
any time I chose. It was such a peculiar 
and old maidish name that I was immediate- 
ly interested, and wondering what kind of a 
room she would have, stepped boldly up and 
rapped several times on the door. Hear- 
ing no response, I was fully convinced that 
Miss Prim, like most of the girls, had gone 
to Boston for "necessary shopping," so I 
determined to go in and amuse myself dur- 
ing her absence. 

What was my surprise and delight in 
finding what I termed a typical Lasell room. 
The room was most artistically arranged, 
and yet contained many things that one, at 
first, might think out of place, but were here 
used in a most unique manner. The first 
thing that caught my eye was a cozy win- 
dow seat, luxuriously piled with pillows, 
many of them tokens of rival colleges; but 
here they reposed peacefully side by side. 
1 was a little disappointed, though, to no- 
tice that Harvard seemed to be most promi- 
nent, and my fears were confirmed when I 
glanced up and saw a rich crimson banner 
waving over my head. It was useless to 
protest; this young lady was evidently for 
Harvard. Not far from the window seat 
there was a small tea table on which the 
tiny cups and tea pot were arranged in a 
most delightful way. Near by was a 
chafing dish that fairly glittered with bright- 



ness, and seemed not to have been recently 
used — for a reason probably best known to 
Lasell girls. 

I also noticed that our friend seemed to 
cling to Stanlaus and Gibson, rather than 
Raphael and Angelo, but we hope that af- 
ter a short time at Lasell she will learn to 
appreciate higher art, and may even learn 
to love Cimabuk's virgin. From the side 
of the dresser hang numerous candy tongs; 
but they must be tokens of by gone days — 
or how would they be there? In one end 
of the room hangs the inevitable fish net 
holding many familiar faces, some of which 
are Lasell " by-gones," and others, perhaps, 
from home. I notice quite a number of a 
certain curly-haired youth, and he is also 
visible on the dresser and desk. Do we 
need much imagination to guess that he is 
responsible for the Harvard emblems? 

Knowing that this was a bedroom, I be- 
gan to wonder where my friend enjoyed her 
dreams, and after a few investigations, 
found, that with her clever ingenuity, she 
had deftly transformed her bed into a most 
inviting lounge. Just beside this, and 
within easy reach, was her bookcase, well 
filled with the most choice literature, show- 
ing her excellent training and good taste. 

Altogether I was very much pleased with 
the room, thinking it was not only artis- 
tically arranged, but showed a great deal 
of life at Lasell; and I went out with the 
full determination to make the further ac- 
quaintance of Miss Prim. 

• m 

The Leaves for May will be a special 
number published by the Junior Class. It 
will be full of interest to all Lasell girls, past 
and present. Orders for extra copies 

should be sent as soon as possible to Helen 
Howes. 

m » 

— We push time from us, and we wish him 
back. — Young. 



146 



LASELL LEAVES 



An Adventure at Lasell. 



They were two lovely Seniors, 

Their names I dare not tell,, 
It is enough if you know 

That they are at Lasell. 
Both had received permission 

To go away and stay 
From Saturday after lecture 

Until the next Monday. 

Light-hearted they did leave us 

Not realizing then 
What an awful thing would happen 

In their own little den. 
When they opened the door Monday 

Of their room, "Quality Row," 
A sight met their wondering gaze 

That made them wish to go. 

Seated on each rocking-chair, 

And on the other, too, 
Were men ! The girls knew not where 

To run, nor what to do. 
Men at Lasell ! Awful thought ; 

But worse is yet to come, 
For these men were not disturbed 

At the entrance, as would be some. 

They neither moved, nor turned 'round, 

Nor did they say a word ; 
In fact, they acted just as if 

They really had not heard. 

What could those brave Seniors do? 

Lasell had not yet taught 
What to do when they saw men. 

Was education then for nought? 
At last the bravest girl spoke ; 

In modesty blushed she, 
And vainly sought for fine words, 

So as to address the three. 

"Prithee, fair sirs, I would ask, 

What you are doing here. 
You're not on our calling lists, 

This is a mistake I fear." 

But never a word they spoke, 

Those same strange figures three, 
But sat there in a silence. 

What dould the matter be? 
And then the girls grew bolder, 

And advancing through the door, 
Sighed deeply as they discovered, 

The terrible suspense was o'er. 
The men were simply pillows, 

Dressed in an artistic way, 
And made to look like gentlemen. 

What an awful joke to play ! 



Now don't ask these Seniors, 

At twenty-nine, they stay, 
Who played this joke upon them; 

They don't know to this day. 
» » 

Lasell has become interested in the plan to 
establish at Madrid the International In- 
stitute for Girls, now located at San Se- 
bastian, Spain. It is under the direction of 
Mrs. Alice Gordon Gulick, a former student 
at Lasell, by whose influence and untiring 
energy Higher Education for Spanish girls 
has been made possible. This school is do- 
ing a fine work for Spanish girls, and by this 
change of location will greatly increase its 
sphere of influence and its power, so that the 
opportunity seems too good to be lost. To 
effect the change $100,000 is necessary. Of 
this sum $70,000 has already been pledged 
or paid, and various schools in the country 
are contributing to raise the remainder. In 
the new building to be erected for the school 
at Madrid, $300, it is estimated, will provide 
one room, which will bear the name of the 
school contributing such sum. 

Lasell desires to give $300 for this pur- 
pose, and has appointed two committees, one 
to bring the matter to the notice of present 
students, the other to present it to the old 
girls. We feel assured that every loyal La- 
sell girl will be proud to have the old school 
thus represented in the land of Columbus 
and Isabella, and will desire to contribute 
personally to the sum to be raised. What- 
ever you wish to give may be sent by check 
or P. O. order to the undersigned, who will 
be glad to receive it, and to see that it 
reaches its proper destination. 

Thanking you in advance for whatever 
aid you may render in this work. 

Mr. Bragdon, Miss Packard, Miss With- 
erbee, Ruby Ryder, Clemens, J., Bessie Ful- 
ler, Frances Leavitt, Rose Taylor, Barbara 
Vail, Committee. 



LASELL LEAVES 



147 



Zoe Hill. 



LASELL SONG. 



Dedicated to C. C. Bragdon. 



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2 If you've read " Guide to Life " at old Lasell, 
Of our trials and restrictions you can tell ; 
Broken oft, no one ever knew just how, 
They seemed dreadful then, but now, — Cho. 

3 Time is swiftly bearing us along, 

And our school-days shortly will be gone ; 
But we're true to the dainty white and blue, 
Raise it high, long may it fly. Cho. 



r48 



LASELL LEAVES 




PERSONALS. 



— Rena Goodwin sends remembrances to 
her old friends. She is at Biddeford, Me. 

— Mary Smith has found a "Lasell grand- 
daughter" in a Mrs. Keogh (recently mar- 
ried) of Wheeling. Virginia Brown, she 
says, is now Mrs. Miller. Mary has been 
ill with diphtheria. 

— Nellie Vaill LaSelle writes of an Easter 
trip to Denver, with a party of University 
girls; their object, to establish at Boulder, 
Colorado, a new chapter of Kappa, Kappa. 
You may be sure there was to be a gay 
time — banquets, breakfasts, receptions, and 
all the rest. Corinne Salisbury is engaged 
to a Mr. J. E. C. Fisher, and expects to be 
married June I, at Corinne's home. Nellie 
is to be one of six bridesmaids — all cousins. 
They, Mr. and Mrs. Fisher, are to go, after 
the wedding, to England, Mr. Fisher's 
home, to spend several months. They sail 
June 8, at n a. m., from Hoboken, N. J., 
on Patricia, Hamburg American Line; and 
Corinne would like to see any of her friends 
who chance to be in the vicinity at that time. 
Perhaps this may meet the eye of some of 
them. 

Ida Trowbridge announces her engage- 
ment to Dr. Louis D. H. Fuller. 

— May Sternbergh, we learn through her 
sister, is in New York studying music. 
Another sister, Mrs. Helen Dodds, is in 
Austin, Texas, 1800 East 20th street. 

— Alma Widstrand Rogers and her hus- 



band were in Minneapolis, when she last 
wrote us. They expected soon to leave for 
Seattle, intending to make during their stay 
in Washington, a trip through California. 
Mrs. Knights and Edith are well, she tells 
us. 

— Sara Hitchcock, of Bath, Me., writes 
us about a Lasell pin. Every Lasell girl, 
now here, or formerly, should have the 
school pin. How many have them? 

— Sade Hollingsworth Thompson sends 
a pleasant letter, in which she holds out a 
hope that we may see her here at Com- 
mencement. That will be a treat. She 
and her husband are planning a little trip 
to Virginia together in May or June. 

— Mrs. May Sleeper Ruggles, who has so 
delighted us with her charming recitals of 
sacred song, recently, has an admirer in 
Mrs. Amy Beach, the most famous lady 
composer in the land, and one of the most 
accomplished pianists living. Mrs. Beach 
says of Mrs. Ruggles, "A voice of such 
volume, richness, and extent of compass, 
combined with so much musical feeling, 
cannot fail to win widespread recognition in 
the church as well as in the concert room." 
She thinks Mrs. Ruggles an artist of truly 
rare power. 

— Mrs. F. A. Seiberling — Gertrude Pen- 
field — has scored still another musical suc- 
cess. In the presentation at Easter, by the 
Akron Tuesday Musical Club, of Men- 
delssohn's St. Paul, her splendid rendering 
of this grand music called out especially 
complimentary notice, though a number of 
professional vocalists took part in the ora- 
torio. 

— As a feature of our Semi-Centennial 
Celebration, we hoped to have Gertrude 
Penfield Seiberling's singing. But she 
writes that she cannot come. She and her 
splendid family expect to spend the summer, 



LASELL LEAVES 



149 



"half on land, half on water," on one of 
Lake Huron's beautiful islands. She made 
her first visit to Washington at Inaugura- 
tion time, and was charmed by our Capital. 

— Grace Seiberling's husband, Mr. 
Chase, will graduate next June at Ann Ar- 
bor Medical school. Grace busies herself 
with literary and historical study, and Ger- 
man. 

— Ruth S. Pflueger is living at Akron, 
and Kittie at Indianapolis, where Gertrude 
went last February and received quite a wel- 
come from musical people, meeting Eleanor 
Young Hord and other Lasell girls. She 
says Mollie Coe Ninde has been far from 
well since her marriage. With all the cares 
of her growing family, Gertrude keeps at 
work going always further with her music, 
taking of German, etc. An example for 
married women, I say. 

— A "beautiful little visit" is what I call 
a dinner and evening with Carrie Kendig 
Kellogg and Annie Kendig Peirce and their 
dear father and husbands. The years do 
not show on any of these people, perhaps be- 
cause they have not had enough of them; 
perhaps because they have been so happy. 
Dr. Kendig in his leisure time is much oc- 
cupied with his rare collections. He is an 
authority, respected on both sides of the At- 
lantic. I told Mrs. Peirce that she gets 
more childish every day. I hear that Eliza- 
beth Starks is in Boston training her voice; 
what a mistake, when she might be with 
Mrs. Martin ! That Carolyn Baldwin is in 
New York training her voice; what a mis- 
take when she might be with Miss White! 
And that Laura Birdsey is with her father 
in Middletown, studying how to make home 
happy. Mrs. Kellogg is talking about a 
year in Southern California, and Mr. and 
Mrs. Peirce and two daughters (who, just 
think of it, are fifteen and thirteen years!) 
are planning to start May 22, for a year's 
absence in Europe. 



Lasell Alphabet. 

A stands for Armstrong, the Montana girl ; 

A typical one, who keeps things in a whirl. 
B stands for Bennet, who sits near 'the door, 

And leaves for her music before lecture's o'er. 
C stands for .the Chase's, of which there are two, 

And if you live near them you never are blue. 
D stands for Dwight, a bright little miss, 

And who, if I knew her, could add much to this. 
E stands for Edwards so eager to learn, 

Who 'answers the questions just after her .turn. 
F stands for Fonnie who'll have a good time, 

Yet be in her room at a quarter past nine. 
G stands for Griffin with hair in a braid, 

Who, in spite of her French, is never afraid. 
H stands for Hawley, tall, slender and straight, 

Who managed to get here, altho' she came late. 
I stands for Irwin, the sisters so true ; 

Whatever one does, the other will do. 
J is for Jones, tho' best known as Nell ; 

And what she'll do next, we never can tell. 
K stands for Krag, who like Sampson of old, 

Exhibits her strength in ways manifold. 
L stands for Lapowski, the big and the small ; 

One is so short, and the other so tall. 
M stands for Miller, you know her, no doubt, 

And that she's from Texas, is quickly found out. 
N stands for Nelson, or North if you like ; 

They both have good times and are very polite. 

stands for Orcutt, who when she first came, 

Thought she'd add to excitement, by first getting 
lame. 

P stands for F. Plum ; if that you don't know, 

Just ask Carrie George, and she'll tell you so. 

Q stands for queen, but of those there's so many, 

That I think I will leave that and will not 
name any. 

R stands for Ryder, the girl from the West; 

I need not tell more, for you know the rest. 
S stands for G. Stone, such a giddy young girl, 

Who has the idea she sets hearts in a whirl. 
T stands for Taylor, that dear little maid, 

Who is everyone's pet as is plainly displayed. 
U stands for Uhrioh, our little Dutch girl, 

Whom everyone loves for she is such a pearl. 

V stands for Vail, little Barbara Vail, 

Who when saying her piece always gets very 
pale. 
W stands for Wheldon, the singer so sweet, 

With great big blue eyes and such dreadful big 
feet. 
X stands for Xm'as, which comes once a year, 

And which when it oomes brings us all such 
good cheer. 

Y stands for young ; we can all share in that, 

For here we grow young as well as grow fat. 
Z stands for Zeller, the last of the list; 

If you want any more, you may measure your 
fist. 



i5o 



LASELL LEAVES 




On Saturday, March 16, we enjoyed an 
unusual treat in the shape of a lecture by 
Mrs. Mary A. Livermore. The subject 
was "Superfluous AVomen," and the bril- 
liantly satirical and pungent remarks of the 
speaker showed how deeply she felt and 
how clearly she saw the facts and the con- 
ditions of woman's position, past and pres- 
ent. There was not an uninteresting 
sentence in the entire talk, and one could 
not choose but listen and enjoy. Mrs. 

Livermore's object was to prove that there 
are no "superfluous" women. Among 
other things she said that, although she 
certainly intended to say nothing against 
marriage, believing it to be one of the hap- 
piest and most sacred states, she by no means 
thought that marriage should be the only 
aim and ambition of a sensible woman — 
that, in the advance of civilization, there are 
now countless fields of work open to any wo- 
man with brain and energy enough to hold 
her place in the sphere of work she chooses. 
The title of this lecture was suggested to 
Mrs. Livermore by a lecture she once heard 
in London. An Englishman, presumably, 
it seemed, a scholar and gentleman lament- 
ed the fact that, owing to war and the loss 
of men's lives in sundry other ways, there 
is in human society such a woful surplus of 
women. "And what," he demanded, "is 
to be done with these superfluous women — 
women who can never hope to be married." 



And there, in the face of all that audience of 
women, he dared to suggest that these wo- 
men for whom no husbands could be pro- 
vided should — to strip the thought of smooth 
phrases — be herded together like cattle, 
driven to the wharf, put on board ship, and 
sent to remote parts of the world to get 
along - as best they could. What a point of 
view ! Where could be found a woman 
who would consent to such an outrage ! 
When he had finished the women present 
promptly undeceived him as to his mistaken 
notion of the possibility of such a proceed- 
ing. "No woman is superfluous who finds 
work to do in the world and does it well. 
Neither sex can do without the other. It 
seems to have been the wish of the Divine 
Creator that these two should co-operate in 
the social and industrial, as in the domestic 
world, in perfect harmony, neither one being 
the head, nor yet the foot, but that on an. 
equality, they should calmly and strongly 
work together." 

Mrs. Clark led the Christian Endeavor 
meeting on Sunday, March 17, the subject 
being, "Christ Our High Priest." She 

distributed certain printed slips explaining 
various points about the Jewish High 
Priests, and showed in her comments that 
they were typical, how Christ was our High 
Priest, and how we might apply the truths 
thus taught to practical life. 

On the evening of March 21, Mr. Hill's 
pupils gave one of their enjoyable musical 
recitals — "not for exhibition purposes, but 
for practice in public." 

The overture by the first quartette was 
very well done, the melody being especially 
pretty. All of the pieces showed faithful 
and painstaking work. What was particu- 
larly noticeable was the ease and confidence 
with which the girls did their work. 

Les Classes Superieures de Francais nous 



LASELL LEAVES 



I5i 



ont donne, le 23 mars, une reception dans 
les salons du Seminaire precedee d'une 
Comedie "Les Reves de Marquerite" inter- 
preted par Mile. M. A. Ramsdell dans le 
role de Ferdinand joue avec beaucoup de 
force masculine et par Mile. F. Hayden qui 
nous a montre une Marguerite charmante et 
gracieuse Mile. Pinkham a chante tres 
gentiment deux chansons francaises. On 
a servi le chocolat et le cafe a neuf heures et 
c'est avec regret que la joyeuse assemblee 
s'est separee a dix heures. 

On Thursday, March 28, instead of our 
usual Bible lesson, we were surprised and 
pleased to hear a short talk by Miss Chis- 
holm, a deaconess of the Methodist church. 
In the few minutes that were hers, she told 
us much about her work among the poor, 
and of the good work accomplished by this 
association of brave and helpful women. In 
closing she sang for us two of her favorite 
hymns, which were much appreciated by all 
present. 

"Lasell invites all her children to a rally 
in the gymnasium at half past six tonight, 
March 28. Let everybody come and bring 
Lasell flags — also bring sofa pillows for re- 
served seats on the floor." Of course we 
all went, as our curiosity had been aroused 
over what it could possibly be, and who had 
gotten it up. After all of us were seated 
on our pillows the lights were turned out, 
the curtains parted and a mysterious voice 
issuing from the side of the stage began to 
read Joe Chandler Harris' "Tar Baby." 
Suddenly strange black forms crossed in 
front of us. What could they be? Surely 
they were, "Tar Baby," "Bre'er Fox" and 
"Bre'er Rabbit." We were all more or less 
frightened until it dawned on us that they 
were only shadow pictures of the girls from 
Miss Austin's table. This amusing comedy 
was followed by equally entertaining pict- 
ures from Lasell life illustrating the follow- 



ing poem as it was read from behind the 
scenes : 

By the banks of the broad Charles river, 

Not far from Boston town, 
There stands a Seminary 

Of old and wide renown. 
And fathers wise, and mothers 

Who love their daughters well, 
Give them the best of all the land, 

And send them to Lasell. 
In September, they come trooping 

From the North, and South and West, 
With their mothers, fathers, brothers, 

Old girls, new girls, all the rest. 
There is laughing, there is talking, 

Hither, thither, how they run ! 
But the schedules soon are finished, 

And the year's work has begun. 
In the morning from the chapel 

March they all to music gay — 
"Girls, girls, throw your heads back, 

Sparkle now with life and play !" 

Next they try to march sedately 

To the wedding's solemn note, 
To "radiate" they learn completely, — 

Yes, even in the air to float! 

A relief from this high tension 

Of slow floating, as they pass, 
Comes a form of relaxation, 

Known as the "Nerve-training class." 
There, in silence still and solemn 

They to non-existence sink, 
Slowly, slowly, fade to nothing, 

Blissful is this Lethe drink. 
And the Orphean, do you hear it? 

Through the halls its high notes ring, 
One, two three, four, one, two, three, four 

One, two, three, four, sing! 

There's another source of pleasure, 

May its memory ne'er grow dim, 
In the tank, down in the basement, 

Where they learn to dive and swim. 
Think you that is all we're learning? 

Then you are mistaken, quite — 
Here is bread of our own making — 

Doughtnuts, too, and pancakes light. 
When some pleasant Monday morning 

Boston's balmly breezes blow, 
We to White's and Shepard Norwell's 

With a shopping party go. 

One a new spring suit must purchase, 

One, some hairpins, one a plate, 
Off for pictures flies another, 

While the others calmly wait. 



152 



LASELL LEAVES 



When 'they all have reassembled 

At Jordan Marsh's entrance door, 
Off they haste for the four fifty, 

Counting bundles by the score. 

Sometimes on excursions going, 

Many wondrous sights they view ; 
Yet there's one sad thing about it — 

I would tell to none but you. 

For, not watching close her leader, 

When a crowded street is crossed, 
To her sorrow and amazement, 

Suddenly she finds she's lost ! 

Next time that these girls go walking, 

If by night or if by day, 
Without doubt they will remember 

To "walk solid" is the way. 

Another thing experience teaches — 

Of umbrellas take a score, 
Its a way well-known to Boston 

From clear skies dense rain to pour. 

Now keep cool and do not wonder — 

True — a man ! and at Lasell ! 
Know you not of Saturday night callers? 

Calm your fears — for all is well. 

But there comes a time of terror, 

With a false alarm of fire; 
Hasten, children, with your treasures, 

Save your soap and picture wire ! 

Put your big bat on securely, 

Take your letters in the drawer, 
You've escaped the burning building, 

Still — 'tis standing, as of yore. 

Listen, listen, from the distance 

Comes the tramp of many feet, 
Like a mighty army marching, 

Never beating a retreat. 
Yes, they come, Lasell' s battalion, 

Soldiers true as steel are they; 
"Shoulder arms !" the captain orders, 

Then "Right face," they march away. 
What, pray, meaneth this deep silence? 

Do not whisper, make no sign ; 
Lights are out, and all things ended — 

For the time is half-past nine. 

March 30. — Mrs. Loomis gave a very in- 
teresting lecture on Bacteria. The first of 
a course on Home Sanitation. 

On Saturday evening, March 30, we all 
enjoyed seeing "The Merchant of Venice" 
played by twenty boys from the College Set- 
tlement in Boston. Their rendering of the 



play showed the result of talent and much 
study, and that each boy had a clear con- 
ception of the character he represented. 
The Mandolin Club furnished the music 
for the evening, and this added very much 
to our pleasure. The entertainment was 
under the auspices of the Lasellia Club, and 
we feel indebted to them for one of the 
most pleasant and profitable evenings of the 
term. 

April 1. — A Pupils' Musical Rehearsal 
was given in the gymnasium. The girls 
who took part were unusually self-possessed, 
and gained great credit both for themselves 
and their teachers. The following pro- 
gram was given : 

Chorus. Day is at Last Departing, Raff 

Orphean Club. 



Pianoforte. Valse, 


Wachs 


Miss Dyer. 




Song. Ecstacy, 


Mrs. Beach 


Miss Day. 




Pianoforte. Melody, 


Von-Wilm 


Miss George. 




Song. Haste Thee, Sweet ! 


Hawley 


Miss F. Hayden. 




Violin Quintette, 




Melodie, 


Dane la 


Serenade, 


Hermes 


Misses Winn, Hawley, Blackstock, 


Biddle and 


LeSeuer. 




Chorus. 




a. New Century Anthem, 


French 


b. 0, Shepherd of Israel ! 


Morrison 


Orphean Club. 




Pianoforte. Sonata. 




Op. 10, No. 1, first movement, 


Beethoven 


Miss Hunt. 




Rose Songs. 




If I knew, 




In My Garden, 


Jessie Gaynor 


Because She Kissed It. 




Miss Wheldon. 




Pianoforte. Etude, 


Ravina 


Miss Bowers. 




Violin Quartette. 




Strandchen, 




Pizzicati, 


Pache 


Misses Winn, Blackstock, LeSeure 


and Biddle 


Song. Irish Love Song, Margaret Lang 


Miss Hill. 




Organ and Pianoforte Duet. Pastorale, Guilmant 


Misses Ward and Walki 


?K. 





LASELL 


Song. My Little Love, 

Miss Patterson. 


Hawley 


Pianoforte. Balancelle, 

Miss Miller. 


Wachs 


Chorus. From Venice, 

Orphean Club. 

^ ^ 


Reinecke 



LEAVES 



153 



To the Editor of the Lasell Leaves — 

Here we are in Washington, and we feel 
so sorry for the poor girls who could not 
come with us. Mr. Shepherd is the best 
kind of a person to travel with, and Mrs. 
Shepherd looks after us so well. 

We left you people at Lasell at 5. 11 Wed- 
nesday, and at 6 of the same day we left 
Boston, an irresistable company of twenty- 
two. Our trip to Fall River was compara- 
tively uneventful, though we felt very much 
as though we were somebody, for was not 
our car marked "private." We were given 
our state-room keys before we left the train, 
which made it very convenient, for as soon 
as we arrived at the wharf we went aboard 
the boat and to our rooms. We had sup- 
per at 7.30, and the boat left while we were 
eating. About 9.30 the wind and sea came 
up. We were out on deck, and most of us 
came down to our state-rooms. Of course 
we were not sea-sick, but several of the girls 
went to bed without going through the 
process of disrobing, probably so they would 
be ready for the early breakfast. The 

rocking of the boat lulled most of us awake, 
and we arose at 5.30, feeling as though we 
preferred the sea on dry land. Breakfast 
was at 6.30, and we landed in New York at 
7, where Mrs. Austin joined our party. The 
most pleasant part of that trip was the ride 
into the harbor. We passed seacrafts of 
every description, and steamed under the 
Brooklyn suspension bridge. We took the 
ferry to Jersey City, and the train from there 
to Philadelphia. We made the most of our 
two hour stay in the Quaker City visiting 
the National Museum, Independence Hall, 
where we saw the Liberty Bell and the 



United States Mint. Up stairs in the Mint 
building were coins of all Nations, among 
others the shekel and the Widow's Mite. 
We had a very pleasant walk down Chestnut 
street, and a nice lunch at the Rittenhouse. 
We left for Washington at 1.33, arriving 
here at 4.30. Mrs. Shepherd was waiting 
to welcome us, and she had already engaged 
our rooms. One of the girl's brothers was 
also here. We all left the hotel 

early Friday morning, and it was such fine 
weather for sight-seeing. A bystander 

was heard to remark as we passed, that he 
felt sorry for the poor man. We first 

visited the Pension Building, and it was de- 
cidedly interesting. In the centre of this 
is the large hall where the Inauguration ball 
is held; this room contains eight fine large 
columns that run from the floor up to the 
ceiling, and twenty-four smaller columns. 
It is said that the building contains more 
brick than any other in the world. In other 
rooms are cabinets and cabinets, containing 
lists of the pensions asked for and granted. 

The United States Capital, which came 
next, was well worth coming to Washing- 
ton to see, even if none of the other buildings 
were seen. All the senators seats had been 
taken up, but we found where the different 
men sat in Congress. The guide showed 
us the peculiar effects of the echo in Statuary 
Hall, and they were really quite weird. 
Some of the reception-rooms, especially the 
marble room in the Capital, are very beauti- 
ful. 

It was such a beautiful day that Mr. 
Shepherd thought that it would be a good 
plan to go to Mount Vernon in the after- 
noon, and we quite agreed with him. Two 
o'clock found us steaming down the broad 
Potomac. It was a most delightful ride, 
and passed Alexandria and other points of 
interest. We reached our destination at 
3.15. Here the air was so balmy that we 



154 



LASELL LEAVES 



had to take our jackets off and carry them. 
Mount Vernon certainly is a paradise, the 
grounds are so beautiful. It seemed just 
like some old country place with its old- 
fashioned house, its quaint garden, its deer 
park, and coach houses. Washington's 

room is as it was in his time, and the other 
rooms have been restored so that they are 
about as they were then. We saw the last 
resting-place of America's greatest citizen; 
the vault in which are the graves of our first 
president and his wife. Our trip back on 
the boat was equally pleasant as the trip 
down. Some of the girls took naps, and 
others took pictures. 

In the evening we went to the Library of 
Congress. Never in all my life have I seen 
any building that equalled this in mag- 
nificence. It is an utter impossibility to do 
it justice with a description. One has to 
see it, to realize how beautiful it is. 

Saturday morning we went to the White 
House, and by special arrangements which 
Mrs. Shepherd had made the day before, we 
had the pleasure of shaking hands with the 
President. We afterwards saw the Treas- 
ury building, and met Secretary Gage; and 
we also went through the War and Navy de- 
partments. 

In the afternoon we went to the Corcoran 
Gallery, which is indeed a treat to all art lov- 
ers. It was raining, but as we went over 
and came back in buses, we were not at all 
inconvenienced. There were so many mar- 
velous paintings here that I will not try to 
tell of them. I must speak of the Veiled 
Nun though, the marble bust of Nun. It 
is so cleverly carved that it seems as though 
you could really see the nun through 
the Veil. In the evening some of the girls 
went to the theatre. 

This morning we all went to the Metro- 
politan Church, and enjoyed the services 



very much. We found it especially inter- 
esting, as Mr. McKinley attended. 

Sincerely, 

M. A. R. 

April 7, 1 90 1. 

» ♦ 

There are few of us who have time to 
read the newspaper at breakfast, and as a 
result, many of us do not keep up very well 
with the news of the day. Last year we 
enjoyed the bulletin board by the library 
door very much, because there we found ex- 
pressed in a few words, every morning, a 
record of interesting events which had hap- 
pened throughout the world on the day be- 
fore. Can't we continue with the good 
old custom? 



Club Notes. 




First Term. 
Pres. — Helen Howes. 
Vice Pres. — Zoe Hill. 
Sec. — Frances Leavitt. 
Tres. — Florence Hayden. 
Ex. Com. — Mann, Lockwood, Hayden. 

Second Term. 
Pres. — Marion Mann. 
Vice Pres. — Florence Toole. 
Sec. — Florence Hayden. 
Tres. — Marion Cole. 
Ex. Com. — Edith Toole, Hill, Talcott. 

Third Term. 
Pres. — Frances Leavitt. 
Vice Pres. — Marion Cole. 
Sec. — Lotta Hewson. 
Tres. — Grace Lawrence. 
Ex. Com. — Goodwin, Hollenbeck, Brooks. 

Fourth Term. 
Pres. — Marion Cole. 



LASELL LEAVES 



155 



Vice Pres. — Edna Lockwood. 

Sec. — Mollie Mower. 

Tres. — Mable Shields. 

Ex. Com. — Curtis, Lawrence, LeSeure. 

— Ella Spalding is visiting- Roe Porter 
in Detroit, her present home, and while 
there Jeanette Knights took lunch and went 
to the theatre with them. On the same 
evening during a party given for Ella, Ger- 
trude Tidd called, unexpectedly, Ella says, 
"I tell you, we talked and talked." 

— Ruth Crouch is studying music at 
Oberlin Conservatory, Ohio, and enjoys it 
very much. 

— Georgia Lord is studying music at the 
Metropolian, N. Y. She expects to be with 
us for commencement. Eleanor Waite spent 
a few days with her on her visit to N. Y. this 
winter. 

— Mrs. Fred Weston, nee Julia Cox, 
when in Boston on her wedding trip, made us 
a short call, though long enough to tell us 
that she was very happy. 

— Elsie Burdick ('99) called in March to 
find very few old girls whom she knew. 

— Florence Wilber is at Coronado, 
Southern California, and is soon going to 
Pasadena. 

— We are all pleased to hear that Zell 
Rising's operation was successful. 

— Clara Eads ('93) is in California spend- 
ing a pleasant winter. 

— Mame Cruikshank ('96) is spending 
the winter abroad. 

— Harriette Lawrence is teaching school 
at Wayne, Mich. 

— Mrs. DuRelle Gage, nee Myrtle Davis, 
('97) is living in Boston at the Copley 
Square Hotel this winter. She took lunch 
with Louise Richards a short while ago. 

— Flora Taft expects to come East in the 
spring, and Lasell hopes to have a visit from 
her. 

— Louise Peycke made her debut this 



winter, and is now enjoying Kansas City so- 
ciety. 

— Jeanette Knights expects to visit us in 
the spring before sailing for Europe. 




First Election. 
Pres.— Ethlyn Barber. 
Vice Pres. — Bessie Lum. 
Sec. — Edith Dustin. 
Business Mgr. — Joanna Deering. 
Critic. — Edith Harris. 
Ex. Com. — Ellen Chase, Ward, Martin. 

Second Election. 
Pres. — Mabel Martin. 
Vice Pres. — Isabella Clemens. 
Sec. — Bessie Lum. 
Business Mgr. — Joanna Deering. 
Critic. — Sue T. Lair. 
Ex. Com. — Dustin, Jones, Skinner. 

Third Election. 
Pres. — Florence Plum. 
Vice Pres. — Edith Harris. 
Sec. — Lelia Walker. 
Business Mgr. — Joanna Deering. 
Critic. — Katherine McCoy. 
Ex. Com. — Clemens I., Lapowski J., Taylor. 

Fourth Election. 
Pres. — Edith Dustin. 
Vice Pres. — Harriette Ward. 
Sec. — Elizabeth Kimball. 
Business Mgr. — Joanna Deering. 
Critic. — Nell Jones. 
Ex. Com. — Kendrick, Lair, Deering. 

The following notes have come to us of 
old Lasellias : 

— Hortense Watts, just returned from a 
delightful trip through Florida, and will 
soon leave for Chicago, where she will be 
bridesmaid for Elizabeth Hitchcock, 



156 



LASELL LEAVES 



— Alice Kimball ('98) and Ethel Johnson 
('99) were among the guests of the French 
reception, Saturday evening, March 23. 

— Helena Hasbrouck is at Wells College 
this year, and expects to go abroad this sum- 
mer. 

— Alice Conant is to be married in May 
to Mr. Charles Sisson, Jr. 

— Marion Stafford is visiting in South 
Framingham. She was at the school, 
Monday, April 1. 

— Elizabeth Snow has been visiting Mrs. 
Elmer Ayers (Louise Thatcher.) 

— Louise Gurley is staying in Atlantic 
City. 

— Joe Milliken has been visiting Emily 
Bissell ('99) in Rockville, Conn. 

— Katherine Moses was at school, March 
22; she has been visiting in Boston, and is 
going to New York about the first of April. 

— Maud Mayo has been in Boston buy- 
ing her wedding outfit — she was mar- 
ried, April ninth. On her way home she 
spent two or three days with Lorena Fel- 
lows ('99). 

— Mabel Stilson may come North this 
summer. 

— Blanche Gardner and Emily Kothe ex- 
pect to come for commencement. 

A few years ago the Lasellia and S. D. 
Societies planned a Club House. It was 
not merely planned, but much money was 
raised for its erection. Each society was 
to give $1500, and Mr. Bragdon was to 
make up the balance. The girls were 
earnest, and before long over half of the 
amount had been raised by each society. 
The house was to be built back of the 
Crow's Nest, and each society was to have 
a hall. The old girls gave generously and 
were anxious for it. For some reason or 
other the plan was given up and the money 
returned. Why not talk the matter over? 
Let us have a Club House. 



English, how she was murdered in the 
German classes. 
1. Bertha enters in hunter's clothes. 

They want to take me to the emper- 
or's yard. 
8. Gessler to the horse with an eagle on 
his fist. 
Gessler steps over the woman back- 
ward. 
Bertha steps into the middle of the 

people. 
This arm can well protect the bosom 
of a man. 

7. With a rapid scream she fainted away. 

8. They made a Gothic bundle to con- 

spire against the Romans. 

9. His blood cooked at the thought that 

one day he might be a Roman em- 
peror. 

10. All the ships were ready for depart- 

ure and the linen was put up. 

11. His accused wife of the murder. 

12. Then I gave up my wife with a bloody 

heart. 

13. Everybody goes to see the criminal 

who is taken to a peaceful death. 

14. How she was pleased when I let her 

make the declaration how to make 
dumplings. 

15. He was dressed in a loose jacket and 

a padded shirt. 

16. I am not the man of degraded ability. 

m m 

Overheard. 

First Girl— Did M. B. C. and M. E. F. 
keep Lent? 

Second Girl — Yes; they both gave up 
chocolate elairs. 

Teacher (in Bible class) — Who led the 
first expedition out from Babylon to Jeru- 
salem? Miss Zerubbabel, you may tell. 

M. C. (in explaining the apparent mo- 
tions of the planets, in astronomy remark- 
ed) "Oh! I took Jupiter around the circuit." 



LASELL LEAVES 



157 



(Study hour in "53")— M. M.— Where 
is that clock, on the folding bed? 

J. P. — No ; I moved it over on the dresser, 
but the tick is there. 

Miss C. (in History class) — Did Henry 
VIII. and Catherine ever have any children? 

Miss G. — Yes; a son Mary. She was 
Queen Elizabeth. 

It is said that at a certain Frat. House at 
Yale, they have Sue Tea (Tee) and layer 
(Lair) cake for every meal, and one boy, at 
least, never tires of them. 

The Senior play was so tragic that even 
the seats were in tears, (tiers). 

One of our Freshman girls was puzzled 
to know why Caesar always was talking of 
Sallies. 

Pupil — Which is worse, to study on Sun- 
day, or go to class with an unprepared les- 
son and annoy the teacher? 

Miss P-c-rd — To be sure, go to class 
without the lesson and "be persecuted for 
righteousness sake." 

First girl — Oh, there is a man! 
Second Girl — Where? 
First Girl — No, it isn't either; it is Mr. 
Hills. 

What is Carrie George's favorite fruit? 

♦ * 

— Dr. M. C. Bragdon and family leave on 
May 18 by the Southern route for four 
months' absence or more. 

The following have been favored with 
calls from members of their families; 
Misses Whitney, Brewer, B. Hayden, Up- 
ham, Buffinton, Howes, Dwinell, Thorne. 
Pendexter, Barker, Rogers, C. Stone, 
Clokey, Bullock, George, Patterson, Tabler. 

Former pupils — Marion Stafford, Helen 
and Ruth Rishell, Catharine Moses, Eleanor 
Waite, Elsie Burdick, Mabel Lutes, Mary 
Vance, Emeroy Ginn, Mrs. Annie Burney 











5l?e Ray i& UKE 

1\ / OTHERS 

Styirt, Blouse apd 
U>aist for U/omei}. 

From Vienesse Patterns. 
Fabrics from Foreign Looms. 

Manufactured by the celebrated 
makers, Messrs Fisk, Clark & 
Flagg. 

Special Stocks, Cravats, 
Belts, Collars. 

Edward VII Mannish Gloves for 
women. 




»■* AY 50 ' Washington, 
1%. * Cor. West St. 

AVen's Furnisher. Boston 









Eaton, Mrs. Julia Cox Weston, Mrs. Alice 
Taylor Potter, Bertha Warren, Ethel 
Knowlton, Agnes Flaherty, Helen Rams- 
dell, Bessie Hayward, Alice Kimball, Mrs. 
Mabel Sawyer Rogers. 

The Summer Abroad. 

Mr. Wm. T. Shepherd, who has taken so 
many parties to Europe, has issued a circular 
describing the proposed Fourteenth Tour, 
which is certainly an attractive one, includ- 
ing, with supplementary tours, the best of 
Europe from the North Cape, in Norway, to 
Rome in Italy. 

There will be a small party for young 
ladies, to sail June 29, on the "Lucania," one 
of the finest of ocean steamers. The tours 
throughout will be first class. Send for a 
circular. 

Wm. T. SHEPHERD, 

372 Boylston St., 

Boston. 



158 



LASELL LEAVES 



Our Seniors. 

This is a 'history, and when it is done, 
You will know it's about the class '01. 

Never was there such a class at Lasell; 

As proof just listen to what I have to tell. 

Ethalyn Barber, president, first is named, 
For fondness for Gym. she is greatly famed. 
She'll be first married, and they all say, 
She marches best if Frances will play. 

Cleora Brooks is the Kentucky Belle, 
Very seldom do we get them here at Lasell. 
Though she entered the class late in the day, 
"She is as good as the rest," Mrs. Martin did say. 

Marion Cole, though she does appear quiet, 
With her room-mate, always has some sort of riot. 
She broke her pitcher, but really she's fine 
At playing the piano, and at drawing divine. 

Isabelle Clemins is next, if I could 

Ask questions in Shakespeare as she does, I would. 
In arguing she is so good, I will stake 
A wager, a mighty fine lawyer she'd make. 

Edith Dustin, indeed, is one of the best, 
The source of much fun, but I will stop, lest 
The callers she receives every week now 
Will all come oftener and there'll be a row. 

Margaret Fisher many of you have seen. 

From her grains of knowledge you all may glean 

Why Auburndale air is best far and near? 

What to do when callers don't really appear? 

Ethel Gallagher sings in the Lasell choir. 

Her voice is one which all do admire. 
As captain of Co. A she's all right, 
Her eyes are brown and her hair is light. 

Zoe Hill whose fondness for Yale we all know ; 

In singing her musical talent does show. 
In the senior play she did very well 
As a man, but really, I hope you wont tell. 

Bessie Lunn is the star, and we do have such fun — 
Teasing her about everything under the sun. 
Her pampon is fine, at French she is great, 
And sometimes she gets to her meals rather late. 

Mable Martin is nice, but oh, such a tease! 

She constantly makes Bess feel ill at ease. 
Miss Carpenter thinks she has too many clothes, 
But Mabel thinks not, and I guess that she knows. 

Cathryn McCoy, even though she is small, 
Is good in her studies, yes in one and all. 
She is so very independent, and yet 
They say she has always been the class pet. 

xTorence Plum, the best natured of all, 
Is not very short, nor yet very tall. 

She's as fond of fun as she can be ; 

What we'll do without her, we don't really see. 



Florence Pooler is not known so well, 

Because she does not live at Lasell. 
From Wellesley she comes here every day; 
She listens always to what her sup. has to say. 

Ina Scott, our artist from Paris does appear, 

By far the most dignified girl we have here. 
Her hand is so deft, her voice is so sweet, 
She truly is a girl you all ought to meet. 

Leila Walker is the quietest girl in the class, 

But though she talks little, she's a mighty fine lass. 
For further information, I'd say 
Ask Carrie George, who's there night and day. 

Harriette Ward from New Haven, is one 

Of the Seniors we are all glad that was done. 
The organ and piano she plays with such skill, 
That the hearts of listeners with rapture do thrill. 

These are the sixteen girls in the class. 

They are very fine girls, but oh, dear ! Alas ! 
In June from Lasell they'll go away, 

And thus we'll lose them for ever and aye. 

• m 

Answers to Correspondents. 

M. E. F. — Yes; I quite agree with you, 
that Auburndale is the best place for your 
trouble. 

F. H. — I think you are wise in choosing 
a front seat in chapel, for as you say, 
you can hear better, and get to your classes 
sooner. 

G. M. — It is customary to put only the 
address and stamp on the envelope. I can 
assure you that it will reach its destination. 

I- C. — I really think gym. twice a week 
would not be too great a tax on your 
strength. 

(Inquiring pupil). — I am unable to give 
you a clear definition of a cow, but refer you 
to Joel. 

(Industrious girl). — Yes; I quite agree 
with you, that a new sewing machine would 
be a very acceptable addition to the school, 
especially to worthy girls who make stocks. 

M. S. (office) — I am unable to tell you 
where you can find a new book of puns. 

(To the public) — All questions not satis- 
factorily answered may be sent to B. Clokey, 
who (as the members of the Pol. Econ. class 
know) we "always fall back upon." 



LASELL LEAVES 



159 




The exchanges received are : The Col- 
lege Rambler, Acta Victoriana , Bowdoin 
Orient, The Polytechnian, The Havard 
Lampoon, The R. H. S. Myth, The Bow- 
doin Quill, The University Beacon, The 
Mount Holyoke, The Porcupine, The Con- 
verse Concept, The Newton High School 
Review, New England Conservatory Mag- 
azine and Radiator. 



Marriages. 

— Minnie Bachrach to Ben Deutsch, on 
Tuesday, April 2, in Kansas City, Mo. 
— Musette Derby Lovell to Newell Tuck- 



er, on Wednesday, April 3, in Newton Up- 
per Falls, Mass. 

— Helen Boullt Med'sker to Daniel Louis 
Humfreville, on Tuesday, April 9, in Kan- 
sas City, Mo. Home address, after June 
1, 604 No. 9th street, St. Joseph, Mo. 

— Elizabeth Hitchcock to John Kelly 
Robinson, on Tuesday, April 9, in Chicago. 
Home address, after May 1, 2207 Prairie 
avenue, Chicago. 

— Stella Ballou Cady to Robert Torring- 
ton Furman, Tuesday, April 16, in North 
Adams, Mass. 

O. F. Hovey & Co. 

33 Summer Street. 
42 Avon Street. 

Boston, UVCfussi. 

Importers of 

Dress Goods, Silks, 
Cloaks, Suits, Laces, 

Underwear, Small Wares. 



BflMMIfBiniKMini 



THE BEST IS NONE TOO GOOD 
FOR A LASELL GIRL. 




WE have been chosen to make, for MEMBERS OF THE CLASS OF 1901, the BEST 
and MOST ARTISTIC PHOTOGRAPHS they have ever had. 

Members of other classes will be given a VERY LOW SCHOOL RATE upon our 
HIGH ART PRODUCTIONS. 

21 WEST STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 



i6o 



LASELL LEAVES 



Foot Anatomy. 

Is a branch of science that the skilled shoe 
maker has to thoroughly master. The 
makers of 




have, after years of experience, acquired a 
knowledge enabling them to produce shoes 
that have a snug, glove-like fit at the heel, 
ankle and instep, seldom found even in the 
finest custom-made shoes, and they reveal a 
style and individuality of their own which all 
good dressers appreciate. 

(Forty styles in all Leathers.) 



Always 



S3.50 



Pair. 



Shepard, Norwell & Co., 

Winter Street, Boston. 



C. RAYMOND di LUC CI, 

CHOICE FRUITS, CANOY, NUTS, ETC. 

CIGARS AND TOBACCO. 

365 ATJBVRN STREET, corner ASS STMEM1 

AUSTTRNDAZX!, MASS. 

D3. S. OOL.E 



MUTTON, LAMB, VEAL, 

POULTRY and GAME 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL. 



Stalls 13 and 15, Faneuil Hall Market, Boston. 

Telephone connection. 

George W. Kimball & Co., 

Wholesale and retail dealers In 

Poultry, Game, Beef, Mutton, Lamb and Yeal. 

Basement, No. 32a North Street, opposite Merchants' 
Row, Boston. 

Telephone 927 Haymarket. 

Howard M. Smith. Albert P. Smith. 

SMITH BROTHERS. 

(Successors to Geo. H. Philbrook & Co.) 

Butter, Cheese, Sg-g's 

Stalls No. 2 and 4, 
Faneuil Hall Market, Boston, Mass. 

Telephone, Haymarket 884. 



Business Established 1817. 



JOHN H. PRAY & S 




GO. 



Wholesale and retail dealers in 



CARPETS ^isnD ZR,TTGi-S- 



of both Foreign and Domestic Manufacture ; also 



Curtains, Draperies, Portieres 



and all 

descriptions 

of choice 



Upholstery Fabrics 



^-PRICES ALWAYS MODERATE.^ 



CTOSElsr HI. PBAY & SOILTS CO., 



Oldeat and K.arg-«Nt Carpet Houaeiii W^w Stag-land. 

PRAY BUILDING, Opposite Boylston St. 

6 5 8 WASHINGTON STREET, BOSTON. 6 



58 



LASELL LEAVES 






161 




Ladies' Shirt and Golf Waists, 
$5.00 to $20.00. 

From Madras, Oxfords, Cheviot, French 
Percales, English and French Flannels, 
Silk and Moire Poplin. 



Blanket Wraps 

For the Nursery. 
For the Sick Room. 
For the Bath. 

For Steamer Traveling. 
For the Railway Carriage. 
For Yachting. 
For Men, Women, Children and the 
Baby, $2.75 to $35, with Hood and 
Girdle complete. 



A Special Department for 

Ladies' Golf Waists, 
Bicycle and Golf Skirts, 
Entire Golfing Suits. 

GOLF CLUBS, 
GOLF BALLS and 
CADDY BAGS. 




NOYES BROS. 

Washington and Summer Streets, 

BOSTON, Mass., U. S. A. 



You should call or send for sample of 

King's Royal Bond. 

Most bond papers as good sell for about double the 

price of this. 

Per Quire Five Quires 

24 Sheets, ) ~> r> ~ 120 Sheets, \ <t y 

, 5 ^ |) L 100 Envelopes, $ H> l 



25 Envelopes, 



This comes in three colors — white, azure and ceru- 
lean blue— and in the very latest fashionable sizes. 

n _ _ n !/:»/» Art Stationer and Engraver. 

U60i Di l\ingj 250 Boylston St., Boston, Mass. 

Calling Cards and Die Stamping a specialty. 



SHOES FOB 
YOUNG LADIES. 

Newest Shapes. Newest Styles for Gym- 
nasium, Tennis, Walking and Dress. 

WE GIVE TEN PER CENT. DISCOUNT 
TO AETj ZASELL STUDENTS. 

THE HENRY H. 
TUTTLE CO., 

Cor. WASHINGTON and WINTER STS., 
BOSTON. 



DAVIS, CHAPW CO. 

J. A. BARKER, President. 

Commission Merchants and Wholesal* 
Dealers in Foreign and Domestic 

Fruits and Produce. 

83 and 85 Faneuil Hall Market, 

Cellar 15 South Side, 

Boston, Mass. 

Telephone Haymarket 777. 



MILLS & DEERING, 

Receivers and Dealers in Fine Grades of 

BUTTER 

AND STRICTLY FRESH EGGS. 

FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

OF WEST NEWTON, MASS. 

James H. Nickerson, Pres. A. R. Mitchell, Vice-Pres. 

Edward P. Hatch, Cashier. 

General Banking, Collection and Exchange. 
Capital, $100,000. 

Business hours daily, 8.30 to 12 a. m. and 1 to 3 p.m. 
Saturdays, 8.30 a. m. to 12 m. Safe deposit boxes' to rent In 
new fire and burglar proof vault. 



1 62 



LASELL LEAVES 



JOSHUA THORNDIKE. 



CHAS. W. SPEAR 



JOSHUA 1H0RNDIKE & CO. 



DEALERS IN 



MUTTON, LAMB and VEAL 

Stalls 3 and 5 New Faneuil Hall Market, 
BOSTON, MASS. 

Edward E. Babb & Co. 

25 Arch St., Boston, Mass. 

Dealers in 

SCHOOL BOOKS and SCHOOL SUPPLIES 

D. A. HOWE 

273 MAIN STREET, WORCESTER, MASS. 

WHOLESALE GROCER. 

Gallons Canned Goods of all kinds and of the best 
quality a specialty. Teas and Coffees. 




Roses, 
Carnations, 
Vio'ets, 
Daffodils, 
• Forget-me-not, 
Lily ofthe Valley 

Auburn dale, Mass. 
Telephone. 



Mrs. C. H. HALL, 

DRESSMAKER. 

Work dene at reasonable prices. 

Special rates to students. 

490 AUBURN STREET, AUBURNDALE. 






BOSTOHMass^ 



issnaa 




™SfiL 



TWttE. MARK 



FINEST ROAD-BED ON THE CONTINENT. 



Boston and Albany Railroad. 

THROUGH CAR SERVICE IN EFFECT SEPTEMBER 20, 1900. 



No. 7 — Leaves Boston at 8.30 a. m. except Sunday. Wagner buffet drawing-room car, Boston to Albany. 
No. 15 — Leaves Boston at 10.45 a. m. daily. Wagner vestibuled buffet library-smoking car and vestibuled 

sleeping cars. Boston to Chicago, via L. S. & M. S. R. R. to St. Lours via Big Four 

Route. Dining car service. 
No. 19 — Leaves Boston at 2.00 p. m. daily. The North Shore Special Wagner buffet vestibuled sleeping 

cars, Boston to Cleveland and Chicago. 
No. 23 — Leaves Boston at 3.30 p. m. except Sunday. Wagner buffet vestibuled 'sleeping cars, Boston to 

Niagara Falls. Tourist sleeping car Boston to Chicago. 
No. 37 — Leaves Boston at 6.00 p. in. daily. Wagner vestibuled sleeping car, Boston to Cleveland and 

Cincinnati via L. S. & M. S. R. R. ; also Wagner vestibuled sleeping car, Boston to Detroit 

and Chicago via M. C. R. R. 
No. 63 — Leaves Boston at 11.00 p. m., except Saturday. Wagner sleeping car, Boston to Albany, arriv- 
ing at 7.57 a. m. 
For information, maps, time-tables, tickets and accommodations in drawing-room and sleeping cars, 
apply to agents of Boston & Albany Railroad at its several stations. 

J. L. WHITE, City Pass, and Ticket Agent, or to A. S. HANSON, Gen. Pass. Agent. 

The only first-class through line from New England to the West. 



City Ticket Office, 366 Washington St., Bostor 



LASELL LEAVES 



163 




BONBON? 

CHOCOLATES 

Delicious Ice Crcevrp So«J». 

45 TREMONT STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 

PLEASE FORWARD GOODS BY 

JOHNSON & KEYES EXPRESS CO. 

AU8URNDALE AND BOSTON EXPRESS. 

Offices: 34 Court Sq., 77 Kingston, 105 Arch Streets 
BOSTON. 

WAUWINET FARM. 

COMMONWEALTH AVE. AND VALENTIME ST., 

WEST NEWTON, MASS. 
All interested in a modern Dairy are invited to visit the Farm. 

DEALER IN 

PROVISIONS. 

Corner Auburn and Lexington Streets, 

.Anburndale, Mass. 



Established 1830 

Alfred Mudge & Son 
PRINTERS 

24 Franklin Street, Boston 

CLASS PRINTING 
A SPECIALTY 



Andrew J. Lloyd &, Co. 
OPTICIANS 

DOWN-TOWN— 323 Washington St., opp. Old South Church. 

BACK BAT— 310 Boylston St., opp. Arlington St. 

Bring your prescriptions for Eyeglasses and Spectacles to us. 
A complete line of Photographic Goods always in stock. The 
best place in Boston to have your developing and printing 
done. Send for our price list. 

Rockwell, and Churchill. 



printers 

THIRTY-NINE AROH STREET, 
BOSTON, MASS. 



SCHOOL ANNUALS, 
ANNOUNCEMENTS, 
CATALOGUES. 



Francis Bachelder. 



F. S. Snyder 



PRINTERS OF LASELL CATALOGUE. 



Francis Batchelder 
& Co. 



Beef, Pork, Mutton, Veal, Poultry, 

Game, Hams, Bacon, Lard, Butter, 

Cheese, Eggs, Cream, etc. 

Wholesale 



Provisions and Produce 



Proprietors of CAPITOL CREAMERIES, 

Central Station, Montpelier, Vt. 



Poultry and Egg House, 

Fenton, Michigan. 



Smoke Houses, Sausage Factory, Ham Cooking Fao- 

tory, Cold Storage, etc., 55, 57, 59, 61 and 63 

Blackstone Street, 

Boston, Mass. 



G. L. LA WHENCE. F. B. Eabtman. 

J. P. LAWRENCE & CO., 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

DPonltry, "Wilcl Game. 

Goods for Shipping a Specialty. 

30 FANEUIL HALL MARKET, BOSTON. 

Telephone, llaymarkct 919. 

_A.<lnmw «Sc Gilbert, 

OPTICIANS. 

|wr ANUFACTURERS of Spectacles and Eye Glasses, and Ini- 
"*■ porters of Opera, Field and Marine Glasses and Optical 
Goods of every description. Oculists' prescription work a 
specialty. 

165 Tremont Street, Boston. 



164 



LASELL LEAVES 



WOODLAND PARK HOTEL 

AUBURNDALE, MASS. 

Five minutes' walk from Lassll. Open all the year. 
CHAS O. BUTLER. 

HENRY W. GOODWIN, 

76-80 Broad Street, Boston, Mass. 

BRYANT & MAY'S 

JLONDON PARLOUR MATCHES- 



Pvefevmd Stoek 

MOCHA AND JAVA 

COFFEE. 

THE HIGHEST GRADE OP BLENDED COFFEE. 
BOASTED AND PACKED BY 

Martin L. Hall & Co., 

Boston, Mass. 

J. WOODWARD 

FISH, OYSTERS, EGGS, CANNED GOODS, 
VEGETABLES, ETC. 

Cor. Auburn and Ash Sts., Auburndale, Mass. 



BARLOW'S ICE CREAM. 

J. B. SANDERSON, Proprietor. 

Telephone 261-3. WEST NEWTON, MASS. 

Catering in all its branches at reasonable prices. 



BEEF, PORK, LARD, HAMS, BACON, 
PIOS' FEET and TRIPE. 



STURTEVANT & HALEY 
BEEF and SUPPLY CO. 

38 and 40 Faneuil Hall Market, 

BOSTON, MASS. 

TALLOW, STEARINE, 
FINE OLEO, OIL, SCRAP, Etc. 



CHARLES F. HATHAWAY, 

MANUFACTURING BAKER. 



Crackers, Biscuit, Bread, Cake and Pastry. Wholesale 
jobber of Kennedy's Celebrated Crackers. Hathaway's 
original Home-made Cream Bread, best in the world, 
kept by all leading grocers. 

Factories: 1906 Mass. Ave., Cambridge. 
769 Main Street, WaltLam. 



G. D. Harvey. A. C. Farley. W. T. Farley. 

Farley, Harvey &z Oo. 

Importers and Jobbers of 

Dry Goods. 

141 to 149 ESSEX STREET, BOSTON. 



THIS SPACE IS PAID FOR 



BY A FRIEND. 



W. H. PBIOK. 



C. A. PEIOE 



PRIOR BROS. 

Successors to Wm. Prior, Jr., & Co. 
Wholesale and retail dealers in all kinds of 

Ocean, Lake and River Fish, Oysters and Clams 

127 and 129 Faneuil Ball Market, Boston, Mass. 
Telephone, 673 Haymarket. 

T/^'p 1 sold by us is cut from Longfellow's Pond, Wellesley 
Av^-Cj Hills. Water from pond is used in Wellesley public 
seivice. The Newton Ice Co. is prepared to furnish a first 
class quality of POND ICE in West Newton, Newtou- 
ville, Auburndale, Newton Lower Falls and Wellesley Hills. 

MILLER & HATCH, Props. 

P. O. Address, Newton Lower Falls. 



A Hardware Store for a hundred years. 

Bnrditt & Williams 

Dealers in 

Builders' and General Hardware 
Supplies, Tools and Cutlery. 

20 DOCK SQ., BOSTON. 



LASELL LEAVES 



165 



L. P. HOLLANDER & CO. 

202 to 2l6 boylston street and park square, boston. 
290 Fifth Avenue, New York. 



We carry in stock a large assortment of 

YOUNG LADIES GOWNS FOR SUMMER WEAR, ■ 

including Cloth, Sailor Costumes, Golf and Rainy Day Suits, and many beautiful designs in 

SUMMER SILKS and MUSLINS 

suitable for Graduation and other dressy occasions. Also Lace Neckmear and Cotton Stocks, 

Parasols, Gloves, etc. 

THE MODEL GROCERY 

IS THE NEW STORE OF 

Cobb, Bates & Yerxa Co. 

COR. SU7VI7^eR MND CHKUNCY STS. 

BOSTON, MASS. 



GIFTS 

For Weddings 
Holidays, Birthdays 
and Engagements. 

STERLING SILVER. 

CHINA. 

CUT GLASS. 

GOLD. 

UMBRELLAS. 

OPERA GLASSES. 

THE NEWEST FADS IN JEWELRY. 

CLASS PINS. 

GLASS ENGRAVING. 

A. STOWELL & CO., 

24 WINTER ST. 



Embroidery Cloths, also Materials for Embroidery. 
We stamp free all goods purchased of us. 

WHITNEY^S^^^^ BOSTON. 



ISKSKESiara&SHKS 




1 66 



LASELL LEAVES 



^ COLLEGE 
GIRL 

Will always find at our store the LATEST 

CONCEITS IN STATIONERY as well as the other 

necessaries for her college work. 

Economical prices prevail. 



THORP & MARTIN CO. 

FINE STATIONERY SHOP. 

12 MILK STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 

Shreve, Crump & Low Co. 

147 Tremont St., Boston. 

JEWELERS and SILVERSMITHS. 



STATIONERY, CLASS and SOCIETY PINS. 

Designs submitted and estimates furnished. 



Tbe Knickerbocker 5boe 




For 

Coll^g? 

Girls. 

Enamel 
Oxfords 
for 
Spring. 



Everything in Sboe?» $3.50. 

E. W. Burt & Co. 

.... 40 West Street. 



Plates in this publication 
were made by 

FOLSOM & SUNERGREN, 

ILLUSTRATORS AND 

ENGRAVERS, 

92 PEARL ST., BOSTON 



Cobb, Aldrieh & Co. 



Corner of Washington and Kneeland Streets, Boston* 



ALWAYS have in stock 

THE NICEST assortment of 



CRYSTALLIZED VIOLETS. 
All kinds of French Fruits, Glaces, 
Stuffed Prunes, Salted Almonds, 
Pecans and Peanuts, Violet Sachet, 
Bonbonnierres, French Bonbons, Fancy 
Chocolates, Nougatines, Marshmallow, 
Opera Caramels, etc. 



CONFECTIONS 

OF THEIR OWN MANUFACTURE 

TO BE FOUND ANYWHERE 



FANCY CRACKERS 

OF EVERY 
DESCRIPTION. 



Also a full line of Stuffed Olives, Pim-Olas, Fancy Pickles, 
Preserves and Condiments especially adapted to Dinner and Evening Parties 



CATALOGUE FORWARDED UPON APPLICATION. 



LASELL LEAVES 



167 



THE DAYLIGHT STORE 



uEFBr) 



"■'niHfJilMi'lMBa 



provides every 
convenience 
for saii-ffic- 

tory shopping — pailor for reading, writing and resting — posi office — telegraph office — safety eleva- 
tors rnnnnig to basement and upper floors — every coiner tliorong dy lighted and ventilated. 
While our eft'ori is to bring an increasing number of customers each diy to the various 
departments, yet our desire is to have every purchase and the detail of every transaction so 
conducted by our employees that a fekling op entire satisfaction win, accompany each sale. 
Ladies' Outer Garments, Corsets, Underwear and Shoes are prominent everyday features 
of our store. 



GILCHRIST & CO., 



WINTER AND WASHINGTON 
STREETS, BOSTON, 



THE NEW SCALE 

HALLETT & DAVIS 
PIANOS. 

The recognized standard of the musical world. We 
have no hesitancy in saying that our Piano as made 
today is as near a perfect instrument as is possible to 
manufacture. You should try and hear the New Scale 
Hallett & Davis if you are interested in a beautiful 
toned piano. We can surprise you in price, quality 
and tone. 

Established 60 Years. 179 TREMONT STREET. 



C. W. Davidson, Pres. 
Newtonville. 



F. F. Davidson, Treas. 
Auburndale. 



THOMAS LONG COMPANY, 

77 Summer St., Boston. 

GOLDSMITHS AND SILVERSMITHS. 

Special designs always in stock. 

Newest ideas in Jewelry, Sterling Silver, Cut Glass, 
Umbrellas and Pocket-books. 
Repairing a specialty. 
Makers of Class and Society Pins and Golf Prizes. 

Foreign Shirtings for Waists 

BY THE YARD. 



Keep Manufacturing Co. 

Makers of Keep's Shirts. 15<> Tremont St., Boston. 

H. B. Thayer 

NEWEST FASHIONS IN SHOES. 

Special discount to students. 
144 TRERIONT STREET, BOSTON. 




DP THI N GS, 

Brooches, 
Hat Pins, 
Buckles, 
Posters, 
Steins, 
Flags. 

387 BSf£s S '" BENT & BUSH. 



ART DEPARTMENT 



AT THE 



SHUMAN CORNER. 



We take pleasure in announcing the opening 
of our Art Department, which we have stocked with 
the most artistic variety of Embroidery, Batten berg, 
Renaissance, and Stamped and Hemstitched Linens. 

Full lines of Embroidery Silks, Batten berg 
Threads and Braids, Duchess Braids, Gilt Braids, 
Patterns, etc. 

We stamp to order any pattern desired. 

A competent teacher will be present, to give 
lessons in Embroidery, entirely free of charge, to pur- 
chasers of materials. 

We exhibit in this department a large variety of 
made pillows, including the new Burnt Leather Goods. 
Designs burnt to especial order, a novel bit of treat- 
ment which ladies are invited to witness. 



A. SHUMAN & GO. 

IVORY ROOM. 



1 68 



LASELL LEAVES 



BLANCHARD, KING & CO 
HABERDASHERS. 



NOVELTIES and exclusive designs 
in all departments. 



LADIES' SHIRT WAISTS to order, and 
Shirting Materials sold by the yd. 

dUR OWN EXCLUSIVE PATTERNS 



LADIES' STOCKS, COLLARS and GLOVES. 



226 BOYLSTON STREET, BOSTON. 



3/Cmes. I^eed 6f TWry. 
.DyCillinery. 



61 TEMPLE PLACE, BOSTON. 



Cljoirc £\nt of Jmportco ilUilltnm;. 
ilUuunino ©r&crs a ^pcc'mltij. 

MME. REED, DESIGNER. 



CALL AT 



ft. (T). gild's 



289 AUBURN STREET, 



FOR 



Dry ar?d par^y (pods, 



OF ANY DESCRIPTION. 



Stationery, Blank Books" 
Ribbons and 
Art Embroidery, 
Fine China Ware, 
Toys, etc, 

ALWAYS ON HAND, AT POPULAR PKICES. 



AGENT FOR DYEING, CLEANSING 
AND LAUNDRY. 



Stationery ? 



GET 

IT 

AT 



WARDS 



49 FRANKLIN ST., BOSTON. 




o.s. 




Positively 
do odor. 



Try one pair. 

All dry 
goods stores. 



£asell Feaves 



a 



DUX FEA\1NA FACTI." 



VOL. XXVI 




Lasell Seminary, Auburndale, 


Mass., 


MAY, 


1901 




Number 8 


V 




Special 


number published by 1 


:he Junio: 


r Class 










Eoitor-in-chief. 
EDITH A. HARRIS 






M. BELL CLOKEY. 




Associate Editors. 
LOTTA P. HEWSON. 








MABEL 


H. GOODWIN. 


■ sue; t. 


LAIR 










ANNA 


MAE PINKHAM. 




Business Manager. 
HELEN L. HOWES. 

Advance : One copy, 01 




Asst. 
JOAJ 


Business 
fNA F. 

.00. 


Manager. 

DEERING. 

Single copies, 15 




TERMS, in 


ne year (including Postage), $i 


cents. 



BOARD OF EDITORS. 




170 



LASELL LEAVES 






This is the State of the Pilgrims. 

This is the Town through which runs the rill, 
Which is in the State of the Pilgrims. 

This is the School way up on the hill, 
Built in the Town through which runs the rill, 
Which is in the State of the Pilgrims. 

This is the Class which time cannot kill, 
Best in the School way up on the hill. 
Built in the Town through which runs the rill, 
Which is in the State of the Pilgrims. 

These are the Editors who toil until 
The hell rings out so sharp and shrill, 
Pride of the Class which time cannot kill, 
Best in the School way up on the hill, 
Built in the Town through which runs the rill, 
Which is in the State of the Pilgrims. 

This is the Book, come now read your fill, 
We humbly hope it will fill the bill. 
The work of the Editors who toil until 
The hell rings out so sharp and shrill ; 
Pride of the Class which time cannot kill, 
Best in the School way up on the hill, 
Built in the Town through which runs the rill, 
Which is in the State of the Pilgrims. 



LASELL LEAVES 
HENRY VAN DYKE, D. D., LL. D. 



171 




THE Junior Class 
wishes to intro- 
troduce to all the 
school its honorary 
member, Dr. Henry 
van Dyke. He is, 
perhaps, best known 
to you through his 
books, especially those 
charming stories, 
"The First Christmas 
Tree," and "Fisher- 
man's Luck." But 
Dr. van Dyke is also 
widely known as a 
preacher and profes- 
sor. As a minister 
he has had two 
charges; he was pas- 
tor of the United Con- 
gregational Church of 
Newport, Rhode Is- 
land, from 1878 un- 
til 1882, when he re- 
ceived a call to the 
Brick Presbyterian 
Church of New York 
City. At present Dr. 
van Dyke fills the 
Murray Chair of Eng- 
lish Literature at 
Princeton University. The degree of D. D. has been conferred upon him by Princeton, 
Harvard and Yale, and that of LL. D. by Union. 

The following letter is Dr. van Dyke's own story of his life, as given to the Class of 
1902, in reply to a letter asking for a few facts about himself and his work: 

"Avalon, Princeton, New Jersey. 
My dear classmates — 

You say that Lasell does not believe in examinations. Yet just here, at the very be- 
ginning, you require the youngest member of your class to pass an entrance examina- 
tion on the subject about which a man knows least, — himself. 



172 LASELL LEAVES 

Well, then, I am told (mark you, it is only a matter of hearsay) that this fortunate 
and inconsiderable person was born on November 10, 1852, in Germantown, Pa. He 
has always been glad that this event took place, for he has never been able to persuade 
himself that life is not a blessing. At a very early age, his father taught him to study 
and to fish. He got his education at the Berkly Polytechnic, the Adirondack Moun- 
tains, Princeton College and Seminary, Moosehead Lake, the University of Berlin, the 
Canadian Camp-fire school, the Woodland Institute of Philosophy, and several other 
well-known and unknown places of learning. For twenty-one years he tried to preach, 
in Newport and New York. He kept right on studying life and liking it. Then he 
began to write books about it. Some people cared for them, and some did not. Both 
of these things seemed strange to him. But he kept right on studying life and liking 
it more and more. This was chiefly because he had a good wife, and a houseful of real 
children, and some friends who were fine enough for everyday use. Also because he 
had to work hard to keep up with his job. Also because the world was full of birds, and 
books, and places to go a-fishing when he had a day off. Then he got a chance to live 
with young men and work for them. He took it with prompt joy. He kept right on 
trying to preach the few things that are worth preaching, faith and hope and love, and 
at the same time he did not stop studying life, and liking it, and trying to write about it 
as well as he could. When he told stories he did not preach. When he preached 
he tried not to tell stories. Some of the things that he did, got into print; and 
anyone who cares about it can look them up in the Cyclopaedias, and Who's Who 
Books ; but they are not of much account. 

This picture is said to look like him. I cannot speak from personal knowledge for 
I never met him face to face. But reflections upon him lead me to think that the pho- 
tograph presents him in too favorable a light. Really, he is a plain, short fellow, sun- 
burned and growing gray; but he remains, 

Faithfully Your Classmate, 

March 5, 1901. Henry van Dyke." 



Senior Descriptive Initials. 



Ethlyn Barber Ever Bumming 

Cleora Brooks Considered Beautiful 

Isabella C. Clemins Is Curiously Convincing 

Marion Cole Most Charming 

Edith Dustin Ever Devilish 

Madge E. Fisher Mostly Enjoys Fellows 

Ethel L. Gallagher Ever Loves Gabbing 

Zoe D. Hill .... Zealous, Dangerous Heart-breaker 

Bessie M. Lum Blesses Many Lives 

Mabel Martin Much Merit 

Katherine McCoy Keeps Marion Cool 

Florence Plum Fascinates People 

Florence Pooler Forever Patient 

Ina Scott Industrious Sketcher 

Lelia A. Walker Likes Ardent Workers 

Harriet S. Ward Has Sensible Ways 



LASELL LEAVES 



173 



JUNIOR PROPHECY. 



We all some time must meet our fate, 
And 't is for us to now relate ; 
To tell to you our thoughts and views 
Of the future of our Naughty-twos. 

Our President, so grand and tall, 
Our dear old Nell, beloved by all, 
A pastor's helpful wife will be — 
And bless the poor with charity. 

Our charming Floss, so dear and sweet, 
Both fame and glory she will meet ; 
In acting she will be a star, 
And nothing will her triumphs mar. 

For our faithful stand-by, Harris, E., 
A literary fame will be; 
In books and papers she '11 be known, 
And all her wit and brightness shown. 

In the dim distance now we see 
The stately form of one Sue Tee, 
The highest lady of our land — 
The President's 'heart at her command. 

To help us with our daily news 
And give to us broad-minded views, 
Our clever Belle will use her pen, 
And interest bring to fellowmen. 

A second Sherlock Holmes we "see, 
Our friend Bess Krag — it cannot be ! 
All plans and plots are now revealed, 
And nothing from her is concealed. 

Harris, M., for human ills 

Will give her sugar-coated pills. 

A few have dared to call her "Quack," 

But better judgment they do lack. 

In a little cottage not far away, 
Marion Mann now holds full sway ; 
A cheery housewife she does make, 
With never a blunder or mistake. 

'Mid roses red and violets blue, 

And other flowers of different hue, 

Our Bertha roams and sells to all 

Her sweet bouquets, both large and small. 

Our Cutie, swell in every way, 
Will lead the fashions of the day, 
In parlor and in social hall. 
Her gowns will be admired by all. 

At Symphony Hall on the ninth of May, 
We will hear the noted Miss Kendrick play, 
With fine technique and greatest ease, 
She wanders over the ivory keys. 

With tasks severe and most strict rule, 
Who 's this we see that 's teaching school? 



Our Marionette, who 's always wise, 
Is teaching children of small size. 

Whose book is this that's made its name, 
And shows the writer's wondrous fame? 
'T is Mabel Goodwin's, whose keen wit 
Has helped her book to make its hit. 

Our friend and classmate, Anna Mae, 
Soon, very soon, will see the day 
When in Grand Opera she will sing, 
And loud applause from all will bring. 

Our gifted Monk can now be seen 
In a French salon, where she is queen. 
The nobility flock to share her arts, 
Which she with all her grace imparts. 

Lida Walters, I do declare ! 
Is she the wife of a millionaire? 
Jewels and gowns she has galore, 
And of servants and horses more than a 
score. 

For both the rich and poor to bless, 
Bess Fuller lends her helpfulness. 
As deaconess she 's won renown 
In the awful slums of Boston town. 

Our Georgie Duncan now we see, 
Gravely counting, "One, two, three." 
The art of swimming she does teach, 
Both in the tank and on the beach. 

Since for her voice is Jonie noted, 

An orator she now is voted ; 

For Woman's Rights she now stands fast, 

And will uphold them to the last. 

Filling the church of Trinity, 

With all its grand sublimity, 

Bess Draper's voice does upward float, 

With thrilling, sympathetic note. 

As mistress of a home so neat. 
Where everything is bright and sweet, 
Our Madge presides. A good helpmate 
Of one who 's chosen as her fate. 
In the dim future, what do we see? 
Our Anna Rouse, an old maid, she ! 
Birds and tea are her sole pride, 
And Pussy 's always at her side. 
A most kind nurse with fingers skillful, 
And power to soothe her patients willful, 
Is Hattie McGregor, who does believe 
That all from pain she can relieve. 
"McLean — Modiste," is that the sign, 
Painted in letters large and fine? 
Now for our gowns to her we haste, 
Pleased by her skill and wondrous taste, 



174 



LASELL LEAVES 




CLASS OF NINETEEN-ONE. 

Motto — "N011 nobis solum." 
Colors, Yellow and white. 

Flower, Marguerite. 

OFFICERS. 

President — Ethlyn F. Barber. 
Vice President — Edith Dustin. 
Secretary — Isabella C. Clemens. 
Treasurer — Bessie M. Lum. 
Historian — Zoe Hill. 



SENIOR CLASS HISTORY. 



CAN it be possible that at last we have reached the goal we have been striving 
for? Are we the same humble personages who presented themselves four years 
ago in the spacious halls of learning at Lasell ? And now before we leave, let us look 
back upon the four years, so full of sweet remembrances, and sometimes, painful ex- 
periences. 

Even in our first year we felt the honor of being Lasell's first Twentieth Century 



LASELL LEAVES 175 

class. Our first year was rather uneventful, yet as we look back upon it now, we see, 
what then was not apparent to us, the latent talent, the hidden buds of promise in our 
class, just waiting" for an opportunity to burst upon the world and dazzle it with their 
greatness. One thing there was in which our class was not stinted during its first 
year, and that was advice. It came from all directions. It was well for us that we 
had learned the very first day, the motto in the English room, "A soft answer turneth 
away wrath," for many's the time we put it in practice during that terrible reign of ad- 
vice. We studied hard, made Roman history our own , fought gallantly with Caesar 
in the Gallic Wars, and came out at the end of the year with colors flying. 

The next fall we were on hand bright and early, and, say it softly, we were called 
Sophomores. This year we thoroughly enjoyed ourselves. We had overcome the 
greenness of "Freshies," and had not yet taken up the great responsibilities of Juniors. 
Such good times as our basket-ball team had, and what crowds (?) we had at our class 
meeting, and what splendid order we kept! Nevertheless, amid all our fun, we attend- 
ed well to our lessons, and were fully prepared to enter as Juniors the next fall. We 
could then afford to hold our heads high, for are not Juniors next to Seniors ? 

Now it was our turn to give advice, and as we had been well taught in that art, 
we imparted our knowledge with wonderful skill. A class meeting was at once called, 
officers elected, the colors white and gold decided on, a class flower chosen, and then a 
stirring yell was composed, after which the class really felt organized, and started in 
for a good year. How we enjoyed the Junior reception, and how we worked to give 
our dear Seniors a good start on their way in life ! Even the "supes" survived, and 
managed to squeeze in some fun in the midst of their drudgery, and as they toiled for 
their mighty oppressors cheerfully murmured softly to themselves the class motto, 
"Non nobis solum." 

And now the "naughty ones" (the name belies us) turn to the last page in their four 
leaved book. How the girls will miss us ! How can Lasell do without us ? But, 
better let us say, how can we do without Lasell ? As we take our last look at each 
familiar spot, a sadness ming-les with our triumph. The clear old chapel, where we set 
such a good example to the rest of the school, in keeping silence; the gymnasium where 
we distinguished ourselves in dramatic performances; the room where we held our 
noted class meetings ; in fact, every nook and cranny holds its special recollection. 

There are but sixteen of us, yet we are content when we remember the old saying, 
"The best goods come in the smallest packages." We cannot be entirely forgotten, 
for 1901 will be seen on different parts of the building and its furniture for many 
years to come. And now as we are about to leave, we give our blessing to all our 
dear friends, the undergraduates, who have worshipped us from afar; and we do not 
begrudge them the success they will surely attain if they follow in our illustrious foot- 
steps. As for us, we will try to be modest, and when great glory crowns our efforts, 
we will smile quietly and say, "It all came of being one of that extraordinary class of 
'oi's." 



Miss K. — What is in Jerusalem nearest the Mount of Olives? 
Miss T. — Palestine, 



LASELL LEAVES 177 

CLASS OF NINETEEN-TWO. 

Motto — Lifting- Better Up to Best." 
Colors, sapphire blue and white. 

Flower, white carnation. 

OFFICERS. 

President — Ellen Chase. 

Vice President — Florence Hayden. 
Secretary and Treasurer — Edith A. Harris. 
Historian — Sue T. Lair. 

JUNIOR CLASS HISTORY. 

The class of '02 first entered Lasell in the fall of '98. Having made certain agree- 
ments with the school not to bring any fancy doo-jons(i) with us, our wardrobe con- 
sisted of only two strong, sensible dresses (2). Soon after entering the building we 
were given the "glad hand" (3) by Mr. Bragdon and the "stony stare" (4) by quite a 
number of the old girls, who evidently termed us "Pills" (5). We "sized things up" (6) 
and concluded that we had "struck it rich" (7), although we were but small Freshmen; 
but after a few "squelches" (8) and "call-downs" (9), we decided that boarding-school 
life was not all it was "cracked up to be"(io). Nevertheless we "hung on"(n) till 
the next year and found ourselves Sophomores. 

By this time we knew that we were the "whole show" (12), and were able to assure 
the other classes that they were not the "only pebbles on the beach" (13). We hap- 
pened sometimes to "gif Mademoiselle a fit" (14), and were promptly "fired" (15) from 
class. However, we soon learned how to "work" (16) our teachers and to "bluff" (17) 
to a "finish" (18), so that life became easier. 

NOTES. 

1 — For the meaning of this word apply to Miss Mann. 

2 — See page 8, catalogue. 

3 — Common expression for welcome. Derivation unknown. 

4 — Originally applied to the gaze of the Sphynx. Now used in connection with anyone who looks 
upon you as their inferior. 

5 — Pill; a certain form of medicine given by doctors, and very objectionable. Therefore a person 

who is objectionable is a pill. 

6 — To size — to estimate the measure of anything ; hence to take its value. 

7 — Originally used by miners when they found ore ; hence to find anything valuable. 

8 — To squelch; to subdue. (The meaning of this word was carefully looked up by Miss Nutt.) 

9 — Probably originated from the fact that children are usually called from up stairs for a scolding. 
Hence to call down — to scold. 

10 — To crack up — to powder and make fine. Hence not what it was cracked up to be — not fine. 

11 — Applied to one who 'has great perseverance. Originally applied to a bull dog whose perseverance 
is shown in his ability to hang on. 

12 — To be the entire attraction. 

13 — This expression originated from the impossibility of there being but one pebble on the beach. 

14 — The meaning of this can be learned only from experience in the French classes. 

15 — To fire an engine is to get it ready to go; hence to fire a person from class, which originally 
meant to get them ready to go, by corruption has come to mean to make them go. 

16 — To work anyone is to make someone work ; hence to get anyone to do something for you. 
17 — An expression of self confidence, meaning a pretended knowledge. 

18 — Originally to pursue game in the best way was to pursue it to a finish. Hence to do anything 
in the best way is to do it to a finish. 



178 



LASELL LEAVES 



A number of "dandy" ( 19) girls entered in our Junior year, and everything went on 
"fine as silk" (20), (our one sad predicament being that we were "busted" ( 2 r) most of 
the time. We got "grouchy" ( 22) now and then when we thought things were not 
quite "on the square" (23), but the other girls would "jolly us up" (24) until we were in 
good spirits again. On the whole we have concluded that no matter how much you 
"rubber" (25), you won't find a class as "peachy" (26) as ours, and the others "can't 
touch us with a ten-foot pole" (27). 

19— This formerly meant perfection in dress as applied to a dude, but by common usage has come to 
include perfection both in character and dress. 

20 — Silk being the finest texture known, anything as fine as silk is very fine. 

21— When anything is busted it has no financial value; hence a person who is busted has no financial 
value. 

22 — Derivation unknown — meaning out of sorts. 

23 — When anything is on the square it is fair and just. 

24 — Make us feel good. 

25 — When you pull rubber it will stretch. The muscles in your neck stretch when you crane your neck 
to see anything. Hence to look around — to rubber. 

26 — Peaches are considered one of the finest fruits on the earth. Hence a peachy class is one of the 
finest classes on the earth. 

27 — Anything that can't be touched with a ten-foot pole, must have a very elevated position. 



TO THE MAIL BOX. 



As I peep in through the window 
At the mail-bag on the floor, 

What makes me gaze with longing, 
WaiUng by that office door? 

What means this hurly-burly, 

These cries from all around? 
"Girls! girls! now not so noisy. 

Do not make this deafening sound." 

"We are waiting," comes the answer, 
"For the mail to be put out." 

But a grave face still looks cloudy, 
And the girls begin to pout. 

"You don't seem to have your manners , 
You will shove, and you will scream; 

At the table you are boisterous, 
Something must be done, I ween." 

From behind, way down the hallway, 
Comes a shrill voice calling out — 

"Hey, there, Jen, have you your key here? 
Mine I 've looked for all about." 

"Yes," comes quickly back the answer, 

"But your mail I cannot get, 
For they tell us, none too softly, 

Each her own must not forget." 

All at once on comes the head-light. 

Now beware, for danger 's near ! 
Pick your skirts up close around you, 

Then there 's not so much to fear. 



Some one cries out just behind you: 
"Oh! a note from Mr. Wing! 

Says he '11 be here for the concert 
If I '11 promise him to sing." 

Then some muttered words before you,- 
Same old story, by-the-by, — 

"If some mail don't come tomorrow, 
Well— I '11 just go off and die!" 

To your right a dark-haired maiden 
Frowns and looks distracted, quite; 

In her hand she holds a paper, 
And she seems most in a fright. 

Could we see what there is written, 
We would understand her mood, 

For her English— "Not accepted!" 
Teacher says 't is much too crude. 

One more weary voice is saying, 
"Oh, dear me ! another dun, 

Fifteen cents for some old package ; 
Fifteen cents' worth less of fun." 

Now the crowd begins to scatter, 
And the noise grows almost dim, 

To their studies they are starting, 
All the girls, both large and slim. 

Left alone, the mail-box ponders, 
And he thinks of years gone by. 

Yes, girls, 'he has been quite faithful, 
And he surely makes time fly. 



LASELL LEAVES 



179 




CLASS OF NINETEEN-THREE. 

Motto — "Virtue alone is true nobility." 
Colors, green and gold. 

Flower, lily of the valley. 

OFFICERS. 

President — M. Frances Leavitt. 

Vice President — Joel J. Lapowski. 
Secretary — Marie Biddle. 

Treasurer — Isabella Blackstock. 
Historian — Ida M. Mallorv. 



SOPHOMORE CLASS HISTORY. 



IN the ever-memorable year eighteen hundred and ninety-nine, many astronomers in 
Mars were anxious to see whether the removal of eight from the thousandth's 
place in earth's calendar, and the substitution of nine would make any change on that 
queer old star. From January to the middle of September they watched in vain for 



180 LASELL LEAVES 

any sign of unusual occurrences there, but after that came a perceptible difference 
noticeable in an important place a little way in from that large body of water called 
the Pedantic. It was then observed with concern that the size and impressiveness 
of aspect of this place, where but few buildings could be seen, was steadily increasing. 
They sought everywhere for a solution to the problem, but for a long time none could 
be found. They fancied it might prove only a temporary change; but during the two 
following year's, from Rebmethes to Eniy (as the Martians reckon time) this altera- 
tion and enlargement continued. Then the astronomers, more and more impatient to 
learn the secret of this odd change, sent down to earth, on a small kite, a message of 
inquiry, asking for an explanation of the phenomenon. This same kite, as it chanced, 
alighted on the Lookout, and was there found by a wise young girl who had gone up 
there one balmy afternoon, lured by the clemency of the weather. She carefully took 
the little aeronaut to her chief, the president of the Sophomore class of Lasell Semi- 
nary. Instantly a consultation was held by the Sophomores. "Leave it to me," said 
the president, who immediately after sat down and wrote all the particulars of the case, 
and then sent the news up by return kite. 

For fear others may be as much in ignorance about this as the poor Martians (which 
would be a great pity) it was thought advisable to give an account of the Class of '03, 
to whom all the disturbance is directly traceable. 

Its preparatory year is obscured by time. All we know from ancient manuscripts 
is that everyone felt a presentiment of the fame which it would in after years attain. It 
did not, however, in that year gain much distinction. But at the first meeting of the 
class in its Freshman year, its brillant future was foreshadowed by an unmistakable cir- 
cumstance — half the number of its members were officers ! With due solemnity, color, 
flower and motto were chosen, and ever since, the first has never faded, the second nev- 
er wilted, and the motto — ah, the motto — can be recited so fast and with such ease that 
did you hear us you would think us reciting that coveted Latin motto which, alas ! was 
refused us. As we began, so we have continued. This last year has been full of great 
promise for the class, and it has done much fine work. Even a Senior, recognizing the 
high standard of our work has joined one of the classes. If "a nation at peace has no 
history," certainly a class which keeps the unwritten rules, gets its lessons and goes by 
the "guide," would scarcely be expected to have one. This must explain why this 
chronicle is no longer — good class, no scrapes to relate; wise class, no blunders to tell 
about. 

Now all the people in Mars are looking forward to the graduation of the class, who 
will then have a wider field for their talents. You, dear readers, will have a better op- 
portunity than those remote folk to see how well our class will then employ their 
talents. 



Teacher — Now, Miss M — , give us an illustration of this fact. 
Miss M. (edging forward and looking decidedly uncomfortable) — 
Teacher (encouragingly) — You don't remember the illustration given of the ham- 
mer and the bin of barley ? I should think that would be one of the striking things ! 



LASELL LEAVES 



181 




CLASS OF NINETEEN-FOUR. 
Color, red. Flower, reel rose. 

OFFICERS. 

President — Rose K. Taylor. 

Secretory and Treasurer — Edith E. Sisson. 

Historian — Eva L. Chandler. 



HISTORY. 



WE, the Class of '04, do not claim to be a remarkable class. Other classes have 
lived and worked here in the past and will, no doubt, continue to do so long- 
after we have said good-bye to dear old Lasell. They have had the same trials and 
gained similar victories, and yet, after all, does that make our triumphs any the less 
glorious? 

It is far from our intention to boast, but we do fell proud, and not without reason. 



1 82 LASELL LEAVES 

of the earnest spirit in which the Freshman class have taken up their duties. Nor has 
this earnestness failed to produce good results, as shown by the high marks earned 
by some of our number in the various classes. In fact, in certain studies, also pur- 
sued by members of other classes, the Freshmen have ranked among the very first, even 
doing better work, in some cases, than the Seniors themselves. We feel that we have 
won special distinction in German, since we have contributed quite largely to the book 
of remarkable sayings, carefully kept by the teacher. In drill, we have learned, among 
other things, to keep our "hands down in ranks," and our "eyes to the front." We 
have also been taught the correct way of going up and down stairs, and are trying faith- 
fully to put this knowledge into practice. It does require a good deal of self-control 
though, especially when, after taking a few steps with the feeling that we are "being 
drawn up," we are seized with an irresistible desire to rush to the top. It is to be hop- 
ed that this impulse will remain with us throughout life, ever stimulating us to "rush 
to the top." 

As for the dignity of the class, we do not feel like boasting much. We could speak 
with greater confidence if we felt sure that our reader had not happened to be out on 
Woodland Road one of the first days after a snow fall. If so, he would probably 
have been somewhat amused at beholding a company of girls, including one of 
the highest officers of the Freshman class, sliding down the bank, their zeal not being at 
all checked by the absence of any kind of sled. But then, a Freshman class is not expected 
to be dignified. That virtue is left to the Seniors, and we trust that by the time we 
have become learned enough to don caps and gowns, we shall have acquired a suitable 
stateliness. 

But, though we are not very dignified, we certainly are a class united in purpose, in 
aspiration, and, more than all, in loyalty to dear old Lasell. 



Senior (puzzling over letter just received) — Aunt Jennie sent John some — well, it's 
something and then "chiefs." 

Junior (unhesitatingly) — Scottish chiefs! 
Special (not to be beaten) — Hawaiian chiefs! 
S en i or — Oh ! I have it now. It 's handkerchiefs. 



(Seniors waiting nervously before door of Lit. class-room.) 
Senior No. i — What 's the difference between a lyrical and an ethical ballad? 
Senior No. 2 — Why, a lyrical ballad is one that is to be sung, and an ethical ballad is 
one that sings itself. 



Excited Junior (in class meeting) — I nominate Miss Jacket. 

President — Who ? 

Junior (very confused) — Oh! I mean Miss Clokey. 



LASELL LEAVES 183 

SENIOR PERSONALIA. 



Ethlyn Fostina Barber, Milford, N. H. Entered in 1898. Lasellia. Sopho- 
more year — Guard, Lasellia. Junior year — Vice President of the class, Business Man- 
ager Lasellia, President Lasell Publishing Association. Senior year— President of 
Class, President Lasellia, Business Manager Lasell Publishing Association, 26. Ser- 
geant Company C; exempt from Law. 

Cleora Bright Brooks, Winchester, Ky. Entered in 1900. S. D. Senior 
year — Vice president S. D., member of Lasell Missionary Society and Lasell Publish- 
ing Association. 

Isabella Cumming Clemens, Pottsvilie, Penu. Entered as Freshman. Lasel- 
lia. Freshman year — Secretary of class, Associate Editor Leaves. Junior year — 
President of class, Secretary Lasellia, 1st Sergeant Company C, member of Housekeep- 
ing Class, winner of First Bread Prize, received Honorable Mention in Bayonet Drill. 
Senior year — Secretary of class. Vice President Lasellia, Vice President Lasell Publish- 
ing Association; exempt from Law. 

Marion Cole, Chester, III. Entered in 1898. S. D. Junior year — Local Editor 
Leaves, 2d Sergeant Company C. Senior year — Treasurer, Vice President, President, 
S. D., Sergeant-major Drill, member of Christian Endeavor Society, Orphean Club, and 
Lasell Instrumental Club. 

Edith Dustin, Gloucester, Mass. Entered in 1898. Lasellia. Junior year — 
Guard, Critic, Lasellia; Secretary, President, Christian Endeavor; Associate Editor of 
Leaves. Senior year — Vice President, class; Secretary, President, Lasellia; Secretary, 
Missionary Society; President, Lasell Publishing Association; exempt from Law. 

Margaret Edwin a Fisher, Red Oak, Iowa. Entered in 1898. Lasellia. Jun- 
ior year — Treasurer, class; Treasurer, Christian Endeavor. Senior year — Secretary, 
Christian Endeavor; member of Orphean Club and of Housekeeping Class in both Jun- 
ior and Senior years; exempt from Law. 

Ethel Louise Gallagher, Auburndale, Mass. Entered in 1897. Junior year — 
Secretary, Missionary Society; winner of Second Prize, Competition Drill. Senior 
year — Subscription agent, Leaves; Captain, Company A; member of Orphean Club. 

Zoe Hill, Council Bluffs, Iotva. Entered in 1899. S. D. Junior year — Secre- 
tary, S.D. Senior year — -Historian, class; Vice President, President, S. D. ; Star Actor, 
Senior Play; Toast mistress, Washington Birthday Banquet; exempt from Law; mem- 
ber of Orphean Club and Lasell Instrumental Club. 

Bessie Marie Lum, Minneapolis, Minn. Entered in 1899. Lasellia. Junior 
year — Editor-in-chief, Leaves. Senior year — Treasurer, class; Secretary, Lasellia; 
President, Christian Endeavor; member of Executive Committee, Missionary Society; 
member of Housekeeping Class both Junior and Senior years; Stage Manager, Senior 
Entertainment; member of Orphean Club. 

Mabel Martin, Springfield, Ohio. Entered in 1898. Lasellia. Sophomore 
year — Guard, Lasellia; Associate editor, Leaves. Junior year — Secretary, Lasellia; 
President, Secretary, Christian Endeavor; President, Lasell Publishing Association; 3d 



1 84 LA SELL LEAVES 

Sergeant Company A. Senior year — President, Lasellia; Exchange editor, Leaves; 
Captain, Company C; exempt from Law; member of Lasell Instrumental Club. 

Florence Gertrude Plum, Indianapolis, Ind. Entered in 1899. Lasellia. Junior 
year — Subscription agent, Leaves. Senior year — Vice President, President, Lasellia; 
Vice President, Missionary Society; Captain, Company B; member of Christian En- 
deavor Society and Lasell Canoe Club. 

Florence Pooler, Wclleslcy, Mass. Entered in 1896. Lasellia. Sophomore 
year — Guard, Lasellia; Local editor. Leaves. Senior year — Exempt from Law; mem- 
ber of Lasell Instrumental Club; took Drill one year; completed course in Cooking. 

Ina Scott, Paris, Texas. Entered in 1899. Lasellia. Junior year — Subscription 
agent, editor-in-chief, Leaves. Senior year — Guard, Vice President, Lasellia; Vice 
President, Christian Endeavor; Lieutenant, Company C; exempt from Law; member of 
Orphean Club; completes course in Studio work. 

Lelia Amy Walker, Mil ford, Mass. Entered in 1898. Lasellia. Senior year — 
Secretary, Lasellia; Exchange editor. Leaves; 3rd Sergeant, Company B; member of 
Orphean Club and Lasell Instrumental Club. 

Harrietts Smith Ward, New Haven, Conn. Entered in 1899. Lasellia. Jun- 
ior year — Vice President, Christian Endeavor; Secretary, Lasell Publishing Company. 
Senior year — Vice President, Lasellia ; Lieutenant, Company B ; composer Lasell Song. 



THE IDLE DREAMS OF AN IDLE JUNIOR. 

ONE beautiful May afternoon, when everything outside was green and the sun 
was shining brightly, Helen came up from drill, hot and tired, and threw her- 
self upon the bed. From without, through the half closed shutters, there came to her 
sounds of the girls playing golf and tennis, and of the chatter of others sitting upon the 
grass, enjoying the beautiful spring weather, and talking as only Lasell girls can. She 
heard one group talking of the coming Commencement, and this set her to wondering 
what original things the Seniors had planned for their Class Night. 

She had taken a book from the shelf, before lying down, intending to study as she 
lay there near the open window, but how could one study with such fascinating 
thoughts of Commencement running through her head ? Certainly, this lively Junior 
could not, and she was soon wondering upon what she would do when she became a 
grave and reverend Senior. Most of all she wondered whether it would be said of 
the Class of "1902" as it had been said of the Seniors, "It is strange that a class of 
sixteen girls should all be so kind and thoughtful of the comfort of other people." As 
she was dreaming in this way of the happy times to come she really fell asleep, and her 
mind being full of such things, it is not strange that she dreamed of the Commence- 
ment week of her own class, and that her new classmate, Dr. Henry van Dyke, whom 
she had met but a short time before, figured prominently in her dreams. In her 

dream he seemed to be the minister on Baccalaureate Sunday. She floated into church 
that morning with all the other Seniors, and could hardly understand how she was 



LASELL LEAVES 185 

there. However, there is no doubt but that "their thoughts were lifting- them up," 
and Mrs. Martin's teaching had been of real benefit to them on this occasion, for once 
they had, indeed, "put their souls into it." She noticed but few things in the church, 
for Dr. van Dyke was so interesting that she thought of nothing else until he had fin- 
ished speaking. One of the things which did then attract her attention, was the fact 
that the entire church was a mass of white carnations, the class flower. This was 
due to the fact that the Juniors, the Class of 1903, had very kindly worked for a num- 
ber of days to make beautiful wreaths and bouquets of this lovely flower, for the 
adornment of the church. 

As she returned to Lasell, something was said about Class Night, and when she 
reached the Seminary, night seemed suddenly to have succeeded the day; and then she 
at once remembered that she belonged there, too. Hurrying to the Gymnasium stage, 
she found all the girls awaiting her, and much worried lest she would not be on time, 
for they knew that the reputation of the class, in Mr. Bragdon's eyes, at least, de- 
pended on their beginning at eight o'clock, sharp. They were not a second late, but 
appeared for the first number exactly on time. The prophecy was a great success, but 
my readers will have to return in 1902 in order to hear it, as well as the class song, and 
the other numbers of the program which Helen heard in her dream that night. I will 
mention what was presented to Lasell then, for if that should come true, I am sure you 
would be especially pleased at having known it all this time. When Ruth appeared 
for the presentation speech, the Faculty, and the Faculty, only, began to applaud. At 
first this seemed odd, but it presently appeared that, on account of the nature of the 
gift, they had known some time what it was to be, having been obliged to sign number- 
less papers regarding it. After the room became silent, there was presented to Lasell, 
the signed contract for Carpenter Hall, to be ready for occupancy the following Sep- 
tember. The building was to be fitted out in the costliest manner, and was to exceed 
any college hall in America. In the curious manner in which dreams sometimes change 
from one place or time, to another, she was soon back in the church again, receiving 
her diploma from Mr. Bragdon. All the girls looked very much as if they wanted to 
cry, and she felt a tear on her own cheek. She thought it very strange, as she had al- 
ways expected to be perfectly happy if she ever finished school. Walking back to the 
Seminary, she began to think of her many walks, in the past, to and from that church, 
and as she realized that this was her last walk over that ground, the tears began to roll 
down the cheeks, and when she reached her room, she threw herself on the bed and 
burst out crying at the thoughts of leaving dear old Lasell, and then — well, she awoke 
to find the pillow wet with tears, and the dinner gong ringing in approved Lasell fash- 
ion, and, behold ! she was only a Junior still, and an idle one at that, and she had over 
a year more in which to enjoy all Lasell gives to its girls. 

She hurried to get ready for dinner, a much wiser girl, and resolved, from that time 
forth to make it as pleasant as possible for all the Seniors, and especially for her es- 
pecial "Senior," in view of the fact that they were going to lose so much in June. 



Miss P. (as a dish of lettuce is brought on the table) — -What 's this? 
Miss S. — Oh ! merely another edition of the Lasell Leaves. 



1 86 



LASELL LEAVES 
THE BELLS. 



(With apologies to E. A. Poc) 

Hear the roaring rising bell — 

Banging bell ! 
What a world of happv dreams its clanging notes 

dispel ! 
How it thunders, thunders, thunders, 
Through the halls at break of light 
Quiet sleep so ruthlessly surprising, 
Telling all 'tis time for rising 
With a sort of wild delight, 
Crying rise ! rise ! rise ! 
'Till you have to ope your eyes, 
For the frantic driving, banging, as it ceaseless roars 

along 
With its dong, dong, dong, dong, 

Din, din, dong. 

O, the clanging and the banging of that gong! 

Here the joyful dinner bell. 

Iron bell ! 

What a dash of sudden hurry its sounding notes com 

pel! 
Through the halls at dinner hour 

How it rings with all its power, 

And invitingly denotes 

What we love. 

While a scent of goodies floats , 

To the hungry girls that listen for its notes 

Up above ! 

Then from out the sixty doors, 

What a throng of eager girls immediately pours ! 

What a flurry, 

How they hurry 

Down the stairway ! Delay opposing 

Or, mayhap, some grave excuse composing, 

Lest that dreaded door be closing. 

Loud we chatter at the clatter 

Of the bell, bell bell, 

Of the loud, loud bell. 



Hear the shrill electric bells — 
Pealing bells ! 
Of what a round of duties here, their ceaseless ring- 
ing tells. 
If to chapel, loud they call, 
How we rush along the hall ; 
What a chatter — what a din, 
Every voice is chiming in 
With a racket never heard before, — ■ 
Till we pass inside the door 
All subdued. 
Now perhaps these bells are pealing, just to kindly 

let us know 
That our school life 's not all play-time, but to les- 
sons we must go. 



To the class of English Lit., 

Where our history is reviewed, 

And gymnastics are subdued, 

Or perhaps it may be some one 

To the swimming tank they summon, 

Where she goes with quaking fears 

And the well-known order hears, 

"One, two, three !" 
If the bell two-twenty rings 
Quickly on we get our things, 
For 't is walking hour, you know, 
And we all must surely go — 
If it is n't rainy weather — 
"Always two, at least, together." 

No time for stopping ! 

Do no shopping ! 
For we must be back at three, 
When another bell there '11 be. 

Always ringing, 

Summons bringing 
To some duty everywhere ; 
Till the last bell in the evening bids us sleep and 
drop all care. 

While we dream 
Of the bells, bells, bells, bells, 

Bells, bells, bells— 
Of the ceaseless, constant ringing of the bells. 

Hear the loud alarum bells — 
Brazen bells ! 
What a flood of terror wild their angry note impels. 
Through the silent halls they scream, 
And 't would almost surely seem 
They would burst their iron throats 
With the awful clanging notes, 
Wild and fierce ! 
Surely fire must be raging — madly, furiously blazing, 
Such a din to startle — such confusion to be raising. 
Do you 'hear the loud commotion 
Of those girls who have no notion 
What to save, and what let perish ; 
Whether hats or gowns to cherish? 
Some fond heart 't will surely pierce 
If those love notes burn. 
Can 't she of some power learn 

To quench the fire? 
If the flames are only small, 
There is water in each 'hall. 
Do not try to use those patent bottles there, 
For a girl could break them ne'er. 
But why this quiet? 
I hear no riot ! 
Now the bells cease, all is still. 



LASELL LEAVES 



187 



Did all the rest imagination fill? 
Well, you see, 't is only Monday, so we have not 
aught to fear, 
Though we hear 
All that clanging, all that banging 
Of those bells; 
Of those wild, fierce fire-bells. 

Hear the little table bell- 
Silver bell ! 
How it loves through all the room, its little voice to 
swell. 
Out upon the din it rings. 
And a sudden silence brings, 
As we listen for the message that 's to follow. 
With knife or fork in air, 
For to move we would not dare — 

E'en to swallow ; 
While the notice all are waiting. 
Now it may be it is skating 

For tomorrow ; 
Or, if summer skies are shining, 

It will surely be canoeing 
On the peaceful Charles reclining, 

Mr. Winslow's bark pursuing. 
Or perhaps the bell was ringing 
With a merry summons bringing 



To the Gym, 
Where we went for frolic yearning 
While the lights above were burning 

dim. 
When Miss Austin's girls, one time, 
Some cute verses did combine 
With an act in pantomime. 
Would some class a meeting hold, 
Should we like to know 
On what train in town to go, 
All would by this bell be told. 
Busy bell i 
Which each Tuesday night 
Always rings with all its might. 
Merry, happy little bell ! 
Little silver bell ! 

Thus we live — each hour a bell 
Always of some work to tell. 

Thus we live at old Lasell ! 
So our minds will some day dwell 

On 'how we lived at dear Lasell ! 
Each task doing by some bell. 
Then we '11 miss their helpful call ! 
Then we '11 want them one and all ! 
Helpful bells ! 
Ever ringing — e'er to memory clinging bells ! 



A SUMMER SCENE. 



THE doctor told me that I needed a good rest and some healthful exercise. If I 
could but make my Armstrong (which I was well Abell to do), I would be all 
right. "Great Scott!" I said, "are you Stark-mad? When you say I am run down 
you Ly-man." But he insisted, so I decided to take a sojourn in the North. Goino- 
to a Taylor and a Draper, I got the needful clothes and the next Day sought the peace- 
ful Bowers of a Hill not far from there. Here I could either be a Fisher or Hunt and 
Chase the game over Peak and Krag to its Lair. 

A Mann met me at the depot with his small son George and asked me if I was much 
of a Ryder, for he said he kept a Blackstock of horses. I told him though I was not as 
Greene as I looked, I was a much better Walker. So to my Dyer dismay he said if I 
was such a good Walker I might Carrie George. As we walked in the hot sun I o- t 
Dustin my eyes and I thought this mistake of mine in saying I could walk would be a 
Thorne in my flesh the rest of my stay. After dinner, however, I managed to Vail my 
wrath, and we started out for a walk of a few miles, and as I started I said to my escort, 
"Let her go, Gallagher." I picked a Plum on the way, and when I asked what to do 
with it, my host, in his peculiar way, said: "Wall, you might Skinner." As it was 
Albright and clear, we went through the village, passing the Brewer, the Barber, who 
was Cole-black, and the Miller, who was white with meal. It was even suggested that 
we visit a distant Palmer, but I concluded to Ward off such an attack of energy and de- 



1 88 



LASELL LEAVES 



cidecl not to go. However, as we were crossing- one of the Brooks, I slipped on a Stone 
and fell in. "This walk is Fuller of mishaps than most," I said, as I pulled myself off 
of a Tarbox on which I had landed, hoping it would Rouse my host to see my wet 
clothes. "Howes that," he said, then looking at me, he exclaimed, "Hew-son, how wet 
you are!" "Say no Mower," I replied, "my plight Shields me from further efforts at 
walking." I felt like one who has Beenett in tag, and, gazing at a Martin which was 
flying overhead, I said, "Thus do the Goodwin." 




T 



DRILL. 



O all who are interested in military drill, the exercise has al- 
ways been a delight, not only to those who have learned the 
fundamental movements both in the setting up exercises, the manual 
of arms and the marching, but also to those who have gained the 
\\ !) I responsibility of holding an office. This work has been increasing 

W4J.II / for twelve years. It was founded in 1886, Major George H. Ben- 

yon being the commander for two years, and again taking command 
after two years' absence. He remained with the battalion until last 
year; at that time Lieutenant Charles A. Ranlett took command, and 
is now our instructor. 

The whole battalion is composed of companies A, B, and C, with 
their commissioned and non-commissioned officers. The members 
are looking forward to the annual contest which occurs during the 
last of the spring term, when the work will be exhibited at its best, 
and a prize awarded to the company deserving the honor. 
The following are the officers : 

Lieutenant Adjutant, Edith A. Harris; Sergeant Major, Marion 
Cole; Color Sergeant, Sue Tee Lair. 
Co. A. — Captain, Ethel Gallagher; Lieutenant, Georgie Duncan; 1st Sergeant, Ida 
Mallory; 2nd Sergeant, Anna Mae Pinkham; 3rd Sergeant, Emily Clemens. 

Co. B. Captain, Florence Plum; Lieutenant, Harriette Ward; 1st Sergeant, Ellen 

Chase; 2nd Sergeant, Florence Brewer; 3rd Sergeant, Lelia Walker. 

Co. C. — Captain, Mabel Martin; Lieutenant, Ina Scott; 1st Sergeant, Bess Krag; 
2nd Sergeant, Ethlyn Barber; 3rd Sergeant, Ruth Talcott. 



SIDE TALK WITH GIRLS. 



H-r-is, E.— It is usually customary to answer "Present" to roll call, and not "Come." 
Sk-n-er— We usually celebrate Washington's Birthday on February 22d, and not in 

March. 

Suggestion to Misses P. and H.— It is preferable in drill to give the commands right 
molinet and right forward, guide right, to right movement A and right forward, glide 

rig-ht. 

Hel-n H-w-s — It is not customary to use profane language in literature class. 



LASELL LEAVES 
RETROSPECT. 



189 




September 11 — "Auburndale !" cried the conductor as the train pulled up before a 
modest little vine covered station. The train stopped, and girls — girls of every de- 
scription, size, age, complexion and disposition; girls with big hats, girls with little 
hats; girls with hand-satchels, girls with suit-cases: girls followed by fond relations, 
girls alone; girls with smiling faces, and, still more, girls with tears, came hurrying 
out of the cars into the station. Who could they be, and whence had they come? 
I heard some one say, "Does this carriage go to Lasell?" The problem is solved: they 
are the new girls, who have come to take their part in both the pleasures and the duties 
of a year at dear Lasell. 

September 12 — Today the new girls were awed to silence by the queenly looking girls 
who now began to arrive. It was soon evident that they were old girls from the greet- 
ings which flew through the halls, "Oh, you dear ! so you really have come back !" 
"Say, have you seen so and so? She hasn't changed a bit! Has she?" "Isn't it 

dreadful without all the old girls ?" 



190 



LASELL LEAVES 



September 14 — From the rooms of the new girls come strange sounds, which seem 
decidedly like moans, but surely that is impossible. The old girls decide that it is noth- 
ing fatal, only an attack of that disease so common at this time of year. 

September 26 — First called meeting of the Junior class. 




October 1 — "Fore!" There goes a tiny golf ball, whirling off the tee under Miss 
Witherbee's window, while the golf enthusiast, hastily gathering up her clubs, madly 
rushes down the hill for fear the bell may ring before she makes the round. The ten- 
nis court at this time is the field of many exciting contests, which Mr. Winslow and his 
parties of boaters would be unable to leave except that canoeing has so many more al- 
luring attractions. 



LASELL LEAVES 



191 



Today, October 3, the Juniors decided that Yale blue and gold should be the class 
colors, and the white carnation their flower. 

October 12 — Has Lasell become a school of oratory? No, it is only that some of 
the girls, who saw Hamlet last night, seek to give an illustrated account to their less 
fortunate friends. 

The thirteenth of October will long be remembered by the Juniors as the day on 
which the Seniors gave them the glorious "Golf Dance." 

Where in the world have all these poor "raggety" children come from, who are pour- 
ing down the stairs and out into the gymnasium? Can they be Lasell girls, or are they 
from some Mission school in Boston? This question was not decided until, standing 
in the light of a grinning Jack-o-lantern, I saw a familiar form, a second glance en- 
abled me to peep behind his mask and to discover the face of the Senior President. Then 
I remembered it was the twenty-seventh of October, and the evening of the Senior 
"Poverty Party." 

October 31 — Will some one kindly furnish the names of the lucky girls who ate the 
pieces of cake which contained rings ? It will be of much assistance in writing class 
prophecies. 




When thinking of November days the thoughts of the upper classmates linger around 



192 



LASELL LEAVES 



the pleasant evening spent at the Juniors' "Salamagundi Party," for, this like all 
which the Juniors do, was a great success. Then, too, they with the rest of Lasell long 
for some of the good things which went a-begging in the bountiful supplies of Thanks- 
giving Day. 




December — "All those wanting trunks please state whether they are marked 
'Wanted' or 'Not wanted,' and also give number of room." These words caused our 
hearts to beat most wildly, for we knew vacation was here at last. What a hurry and 
scurry we were all in ! The trunks are packed, good-byes and "Be sure you write to 
me's" are said, and then the girls are gone to the several chimneys where Santa Claus 
is most likely to find their stockings. 



January 9 — Once more we are all back at old Lasell, beginning with this new cen- 
tury another term; but do our thoughts never stray from our tasks, or, perhaps, as we 
sit before the fire in the library, dinner over and the time to study not yet come, do we 
never think of that last dance, or of all the theatre parties, or, yes, of certain of 

our friends? 

January 24 — "Hush, here they come!" "Company, attention! Present arms !" The 
battalion is ready to receive Charles Ward Post, 62, G. A. R., which now mardies be- 
tween the rows of excited girls. "Company, salute ! Port arms. Disband!" A 
rush, introductions, a good time, and the evening is over. Some of us, who attended 



LASELL LEAVES 193 

Mr. Ranlett's exhibition of fencing, are trying to decide whether the duels described in 
modern novels are strictly in accordance with the rules. 




February — It must be the beginning of the nineteenth century instead of the twenti- 
eth, or else I am dreaming, for I certainly see, clad in flowing robes, with bodices Grace- 
fully draped with crossed fichus, stately white-haired ladies descending into the dining- 
room. Looking out from under high puffs of powdered hair are bright, happy faces, 
whose rosy cheeks, with here and there pieces of black court plaster, are in striking con- 
trast to their blanched locks. We all seated ourselves, an orchestra commenced to 
play, and, and — "Why, what is the matter ! I have been asleep at the table, do you 
say? It is impossible, for do I not still see those old fashioned ladies?" "February 
twenty-second," you say, "and our girls are dressed up? Well, I never!" 

On the evening of February 9 the "Senior Play" was a grand success. The advice 
now given to the Supes is, "Look well to your senior and prevent her from being 
forced, on account of her wonderful powers, into becoming an actress." 

Let February 15 be forever a day of mourning, for it was then that Mr. James intro- 



194 

duced us to Joaquin Miller, 
ing- dread to Lasell girls. 



LASELL LEAVES 
He little thought that "Columbus" would become a haunt- 





March — "Won't you come in?" "No, I can't stop a minute, because I just must go 
and finish my composition, and then there is all that French for tomorrow. I do wish 
Mademoiselle wouldn't give such long lessons just now, when everyone else does, too." 
Now-a-days this is what is heard on all sides; for we are all busy, especially the Seniors 
with their essays and Class Day affairs. It is certainly useless to mention here the 
French play. We refer you to the last number of the Leaves. 



LASELL LEAVES 



195 



If April showers bring May flowers, then Auburndale ought to soon become a wil- 
derness of color and beauty. We all feel like saying as a little boy did, "Mamma, will 
God have enough water left way up there to drink when He's thirsty?" Although 
the sun insisted in being angry and turned his back to us, still we all seemed to be able 
to enjoy vacation. 




Miss C. — Where did you say your quotation was from? 
Miss H. — Wordsworth's Ibid. 



Dr. G. — You may tell us something, Miss C., about infant industries. 
Miss C. (unhesitatingly) — It is a place where children are employed. 



196 



LASELL LEAVES 








A LASELL GIRL'S ANSWER. 

HE. 

Pretty maid! Pretty maid! Will you be mine? 
You shall not wash dishes, nor yet feed the swine, 
But sit on a cushion and wear a gold ring, 
And feast upon strawberries, sugar, and cream. 

SHE. 

Thank you, sir ! Thank you, sir ! Your offer is kind, 
But I love to wash dishes, and soon I should find 
That to sit on a cushion and not do a thing 
To me great discomfort and sadness would bring. 



"AND THE LAST SHALL BE FIRST." 

— Black stein. 

When Gabriel blows the final trump, 

And all the dead arise, 
And gather into happy homes, 
■ Awaiting in the skies; 
When all the blest are gathered in. 

And Peter's shut the gate; 
At Heaven's door, as at Lasell, 

Will Marion Cole come late? 



To Women 



From Viennese Patterns 
■fabric from M? oreigrn Aiooins. 

Manufactured by the Celebrated Makers, 
Messrs. Fisk, Clark & Flagg, New York. 



SHIRTS 



Penang-, Madras, Cheviot, Pique, 
I.ineu, linui. 

$3.50 to $6 00 
BLOUSES Cheviot, Pique, $4.50 

WAISTS J "-"««' *"*- «»fe a, TO $10 .oo 

mcpi/ nDrcc S Stocks, Cravati, 
" tlA UKtaa j Windsors, Ties. 



75c. to $2.50 
$2 00 
dc ■ 1-0 i Pique lieather, Silk, Satin. 
BELTS } 75o to $10.00. 



GLOVES Mannish Style 
or. -i-c j Pique Xieathei 

COLLARS Many Styles 



15c 



25o. 



RAY 



OUTFITTER 

TO 
MEN AND WOMEN. 



500 Washing-ton St., cor. West. 



STRIKES. 



"Two souls with but a single thought, 

Two hearts that beat as one." 
Griffin and Martin. 
George and Walker. 

Ramsdell and Too Numerous to Mention. 
"Jonie" and Ethlyn. 
Leavitt and Kimball. 
Harris E. and Foster G. 
Hamilton and Smith. 
L. Chase and Kendrick. 
Jones and Dustin. 
Chase E. and Pearson. 
Stone C. and Crosby. 
Hill and Lair. 
Whitley and Taylor. 



LASELL LEAVES 



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198 



LASELL LEAVES 




01. 

"Augers bore holes, but these bores bore a whole community." — Anon. 
E. B-rb-r — "Congratulate me, friends, for I am to marry." 

C. Br- -ks — "People of a lively imagination are generally curious, and always when a 

little in love." 
I. Cl-m-ns — "I was ever of an opinion." 
M. C-le — "One ear it heard, at the other out it went." 

E. D-st-n — "She was made for happy thoughts, for singing and sweet laughter." 
M. F-sh-r — "A bright, little, comely girl with large, dark eyes." 

E. G-11-gh-r — "She had a great liking for show, and bright colors." 
Z. H-ll — "Business managers, attention! I am a star player." 

B. L-m — "Good, oh, so good! How do you endure this wicked world?" 
M. M-rt-n — "I want to be a captain 

And with my comp'ny stand. 

Four stripes upon my drill suit 

And a sword within my hand." 

K. McC-y— "Little, but oh my !" 

F. Pl-m — "Why should the evil one have all the good times ?" 
F. P- -1-r — "As silent as the pictures on the walls." 

I. Sc-tt — "A manner so plain, grave, unaffected and sincere." 
L. W-lk-r — "Bashfulness is an ornament to youth." 
H. W-rd — "Wit now and then, struck smartly, shows a spark." 

'02. 
"Noble by birth, yet nobler by great deeds." — Longfelloiv. 

E. Ch-s "Hang trouble, care will kill a cat." 

L. Ch-s "Another tumble! That's her precious nose." 

B. Cl-k-y — "Order is Heaven's first law." 

J. D- -r-ng — "What she undertook to do, she did." 

B. Dr-p-r — "I hear, yet say not much, but think the more." 



LASELL LEAVES 199 

p' j^ > — "Two souls without a single thought." 

M. G- -dw-n — "She thinks too much. Such girls are dangerous." 

E. H-rr-s — "Glide folk are scarce — tak' care o' me." 

M. H-rr-s — "There 's no art to find the mind's construction in the face." 

F. H-yd-n — "He who has a superlative for everything wants a measure for the great or 

small." 
L. H-ws-n — "Be not all sugar or the world will gulp thee down." 
M. H-11-nb-ck — "If you have tears prepare to shed them now." 
H. H-w-s — "She tells you flatly what her mind is." 
K. K-ndr-ck — "Where the tall nothing stood; 

A shapeless shape." 

B. Kr-g — "When I first put this uniform on, 

I said as I looked in the glass, 

'There 's one to a million 

That any civilian 
My figure and form could surpass.' " 
S. T. L- -r — "She was not inclined to labor 

For herself or for her neighbor, 

For she dearly loved her ease." 

C. McL- -n — "The worst I know, I would do good too." 

M. M-nn — "So wise, so young, they say, do never live long." 

H. McGr-g-r — "Sweet mercy is nobility's true badge." 

A. M. P-nkh-m — "Neved idle a moment, but thrifty and thoughtful of others." 

M. R-msd-11 — "Her words do show her wit incomparable." 

A. R- -s "Give thy thoughts no tongue." 

M. Uph-m — "Every artist was first an amateur. 

L. W-lt-rs — "Her head was bare but for her native ornament of hair, in which a simple 
bow was always tied." 

B. Wh-t "So light of foot, so light of spirit." 

'03- 

"There is small choice in rotten apples." — Anon. 

M. B-ddl "This incessant giggling must be stopped." 

I. Bl-ckst-ck- — "The fat, affectionate smile.'' 
I. B-w-rs — "Impulsive, earnest, prompt to act." 

G. B-ll-ck — "A geometrical line, length without breadth." 

E. Cl-m-ns — "W 7 hose sore task does not divide Sunday from the week." 

C. D-Gr-ff — "She had a cool, collected look, 

As if her pulses beat by book." 
C. D- -g'l-ss — " Linked sweetness long drawn out." 

C. G- -rg "My attachments are strong attachments, but often weaken." 

L. H-rm-n — "She was made for happy thoughts." 

B. H-yd-n — "With a clear and warbling voice, like a skylark singing." 

J. H-tch-ns — "To see her is to love her and love but her forever." 



200 LASELL LEAVES 

J. L-P-wsk "Large she was in every way." 

L. L-P-wsk "On their own merits modern men are dumb." 

N. J-n-s — "A villian, a liar, a mean horse-thief, 

All these and more make an editor-in-chief." 

F. L- -v-tt — "Her sunny locks hang on her temple, like a golden fleece." 
M. Lym-n — "I still see something to be done." 

I. M-ll-ry — "Her voice was ever soft, gentle, 

And low, an excellent thing in woman." 
H. Orc-tt — "A maiden modest, yet self-possessed." 
H. P-nd-xt-r — "Sober as a judge." 

B. R-b-s-n — "Lips refusing out in words their mystic thoughts to dole." 
E. R-z-lle— Prov. 16: 18. 
M. St-rk — "As good as a comedy." 
Ca. St-n "I am nothing if not critical." 

G. St-n "And still they gazed, and still the wonder grew, 

That one small head could carry all (she thought) she knew." 

E. Th-rn "A g-ood child on the whole, meek, manageable." 

M. Wh-tn-y — "Can any mortal mixture of earth's mould 

Breathe such divine, enchanting ravishment?" 

'04. 
"Unthinking, idle, wild, and young." — Anon. 
E. B-hn — "Nut-brown maiden, thou hast a slender waist to clasp." 

E. Ch-ndl-r — "Known unto few, but prized as far as known." 
P. D-v-s — "Pleased with a rattle, tickled with a straw." 

F. Edw-rds — "Laugh and grow fat." 

J. Gr-ff-n — "Seein' as a leopard can 't change his spots, 

I reckon you '11 alius be sorter Fresh." 
E. H-nt — "I to myself am dearer than a friend. 
E. W. K-mb-11— (See below.) 

G. McC-nn-11 — "Fresh as a flower." 

E. L-ckw- -d — "That same face of yours looks like the title-page to a whole volume of 

roguery." 
G. Ordw-y — "Neat, not gaudy." 
M. P-lm-r — "But what I want 's a perfect man, 

Complete, and all alive." 
M. P-rk-r — "And then came one of sweet and earnest looks." 
D .R-g-rs — "Think of me as you please." 

E. S-ss-n — "Thy locks uncombed, like a rough wind appear." 
E. S-th-rl-nd— "The style is the girl." 
R. T-vl-r — "The fairest rose is always the freshest." 
L. Z-ll-r — "Thin as a shadow, short as a dream." 
E. W. K-mb-11 — "She seemed a cherub, who had lost his way and wandered hither." 

'05- 

"Oh! Mirth and Innocence: Oh! Milk and Water." — Byron. 
G. P-tt-rs-n — "Something quite out of the common." 



LASELL LEAVES 201 

V. T-bl-r — "So sad, so tender, and so true." 

E. Wh-tl-y— "Modest she seems, not shy." 

B. V- -1 — "Little at the first, but mighty at the last." 
L. W- -db-ry — "When there 's a man in the case, 

You know all other things give place." 

SPECIALS. 

"Satan finds some mischief still for idle hands to do." 
M. Ab-1 — "Something between a hindrance and a help." 
M. Albr-ght — "If she will, she will, 

You may depend on 't; 
If she won't, she won't, 
And there 's an end on 't." 
L. Al-x-nd-r — "A highly respectable young woman." 
L. Armstr-ng — "In stature she was passing tall, 
And sparely formed and lean." 
A. W. B-rk-r — "Upper rooms to rent she has, 

Without furniture, but with gas." 
A. B-nn-tt — "She had the blithest little laugh you ever heard." 

M. Bl-g "None but herself can be her parellel." 

S. B-wl-nd — "A heart that in her labor sings." 

F. Br-w-r — "There 's little of the melancholy element in her." 

M. B-ff-ngt-n — "Music hath charms to soothe the savage breast." 
H. Ch-lds — "There is not such another." 

D. Cl-rk — "She taketh most delight in musical instruments." 
L. Cr-sby — "At every word a reputation dies." 

C. C-rt-s — "She '11 grow up by and by." 

A. Dw-n-11 — "Not beautiful in curve and line, but something more and better." 
L. Dw-g"ht — "Too bright to live." 

S. Dy-r — "Neat as a pin, and blooming as a rose." 

B. F-lk — "Such a fresh, blooming, chubby, rosy-cosy, modest little bud." 
M. Fr-nch — "Shy she was, and I thought her cold." 

A. F-st-r j 

G. F-st-r >• — "Same name, but yet how different." 
L. F-st-r J 

A. G- -r — "My man 's as true as steel." 

A. Gr- -n "Ah ! when I see that smile appear, 

My heart again is filled with cheer." 

F. H-m-lt-n — "She looks like the afternoon shadow of somebody else." 

E. H-z-lt-n — "Talking she knew not why, nor cared not why." 
E. H-wl-y — "I can guard my own." 

F Irw-n ( "P ut em m a b a S, anc ^ sna ^e 'em, 

•s Yourself o' th' sudden would mistake 'em 
M. Irw-n ( Aml not know whkh is which _" 

S. L-wr-n "Light she was, and like a fairy." 



202 LASELL LEAVES 

G. L-th-n — "A mind not to be changed by place or time." 
G. L-wr-n- - ) 

M. M-w-r V "We stand among them, but not of them," 
J. P-lm-r J 

C. LeS- -r — "A babe in a house is a well-spring of pleasure." 

M. M-hl-r — "I am neither cross nor proud." 

G. M-tth- -s — "Methought I heard a sound cry, 'Sleep no more.' " 

M. M-ll-r — "Techy and wayward." 

M. N-ls-n — "They say she knew much that she never told." 

T. N-rth — "A lovely being, lithely formed and molded" ( ?) 

E. P- -rs-n — "Every monkey will have his gambols." 

A. Ph-lps — "Oh! rare the head piece, if but brains were there." 
I. R-ss — "For my voice, I have lost it 

With howling and singing of anthems.'" 
R. Ryd-r — "Quick and fine-witted." 
M. Sh- -Ids— "What 's in a name?" 
R. Sk-nn-r — "The earth has bubbles like the sea, 
And this is of them." 

F. Sm-th — "She wears the rose of youth upon her." 
S- -thw-ck — "Why, how you stand, girl !" 

C-r- St-n "She is so queer. Is she a native?" 

R. T-lc-tt — "But oh, my little golden head!" 
J. T-rb-x — -"She would not with premptory tone 

Assert the nose upon her face her own." 
F. T- -1 "There are no men to conquer in this wood, 

That makes my only woe." 
T. Uhr-c — "Hast thy toil o'er books consumed the midnight oil?" 
A. W-lls — -"Be to her virtues very kind; be to her faults a little blind." 
K. Wh-ld-n — "Bright gem, instinct with music — vocal spark." 

SCATTERING. 

Methodist Choir — "Swans sing before they die, 

'T were no bad thing did certain 
Persons die before they sing." 
Shakespeare Class — "Time elaborately thrown away." 
Annex Girls — "To mischief bent." 
Chorus Classes — "Sentimentally they are disposed to harmony, but 

Organically they are incapable of a tune." 
Cooking Classes — "One may live without friends, one may live without books, 

But civilized man cannot live without cooks." 
Board of Editors — "Hush! don't disturb them, 

They 're hunting for an idea." 
Grinds — "Pains, reading, study, are their just pretence, 
And all they want is spirit, taste, and sense." 



LASELL LEAVES 
BEFORE AND AFTER. 



203 



'Twas in the year of ninety-eight, 

One lovely Autumn day. 
She left the home bequeathed by fate 

For Laseli far away. 
Her trunks had all been neatly packed 

With dresses new, though plain. 
There was n't a single thing she lacked, 

So thought this maiden vain. 
Her hair was braided down her back 

And tied with ribbon bright. 
Her dress — 't was made more like a sack 

For fear 't would be too tight. 
Her walking skirt was rather short — 

Eight inches from the ground — 
For well the Catalogue she'd sought. 

That no flaws might be found. 
She 'd said good-bye to every friend ; 

She'd kissed her mother dear. 
They little dreamed that ne'er again 

The same she 'd reappear. 



'T was in the spring of ninety-nine. 
One perfect day in June, 



She left the school she thought so fine 

For home — 't was all too soon. 

Her trunks were packed — though not 
first-rate ; 

Her eyes were filled with tears. 
She 'd said good-bye to all the girls 

Whom she 'd not see for years. 
Her hair was coiled. I can't tell how — 

Her dress — it fitted well — 
She thought she was quite plain now, 

But really she looked swell. 
Her skirt — it trailed three feet behind, 

Quite contrary to rule 
The Guide had hung — Well, never mind, 

She 'd been one year at school. 
She reached her home — How all did stare ! 

But why, she could not guess. 
Fler mother knew. This school so rare 

Does many parents bless. 

:Ji i$z % ?}c ^ 

The moral of this little rhyme 
'T is wiser not to tell. 
Lest maidens all, of every clime, 
Should heed, and seek Laseli. 



THE BEST IS NONE TOO GOOD 
EOR A LASELL GIRL. 




WE have been chosen to make, for MEMBERS OF THE CLASS OF 1901, the BEST 
and MOST ARTISTIC PHOTOGRAPHS they have ever had. 

Members of other classes will be given a VERY LOW SCHOOL RATE upon our 
HIGH ART PRODUCTIONS. 

21 WEST STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 



204 



LASELL LEAVES 



Foot Anatomy. 

Is a branch of science that the skilled shoe 
maker has to thoroughly master. The 
makers of 




have, after years of experience, acquired a 
knowledge enabling them to produce shoes 
that have a snug, glove-like fit at the heel, 
ankle and instep, seldom found even in the 
finest custom-made shoes, and they reveal a 
style and individuality of their own which all 
good dressers appreciate. 

(Forty styles in all Leathers.) 



Always 



S3.50 



Pair. 



Shepard, Norwell & Co., 

Winter Street, Boston. 



C. BAY3IOND di LUC CI, 

CHOICE FRUITS, CANOY, NUTS, ETC. 

CIGARS and TOBACCO. 
HC,r> ATJJiUJIN STJtEET, corner ASH STMEE7 
AVRXTJtNHAl.JS, MASS. 



MUTTON, LAMB, VEAL, 

POULTRY and GAME 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL. 



Stalls 13 and 15, Faneuil Hall Market, Boston. 

Telephone connection. 

George W. Kimball & Co., 

Wholesale and retail dealers in 

Poultry, Game, Beef, Mutton, Lamb and Yeal. 

Basement, No. 32a North Street, opposite Merchants' 
Row, Boston. 

Telephone 927 Haymarket. 
Howard M. Smith. Albert P. Smith. 

SMITH BROTHERS. 

(Successors to Geo. H. Phil brook & Co.) 

Butter, Cheese, E«*g-s 

Stalls No. 2 and 4, 

Faneuil Hall Market, Boston, Mass. 

Telephone, Haymarket SS4. 



Business Established 1817. 



JOHN H. PRAY & SONS CO. 



Wholesale and retail dealers in 



CARPETS ^-Intid RUaS. 



of both Foreign and Domestic Manufacture; also 



Curtains, Draperies, Portieres 



and all 

descriptions 

of choice 



Upholstery Fabrics 



^"PRICES ALWAYS MODERATENESS 



CrOTHlST IH. FttJ^ir & SOlsTS CO., 

Oiliest mill Kiarg-eMt Carpet House in Mew Eng-laiitl. 

PRAY BUILDING, Opposite Boylston St. 

6 5 8 WASHINGTON STREET, BOSTON. 6 5 8 



LASELL LEAVES 



205 



1 1 [ 

1 1 1 


r 

r 


' I \ 

lu: 

-^ 1 


1 
1 
1 




Blanket Wraps 

For the Nursery. 
For the Side Room. 
For the Balh. 

For Steamer Traveling. 
For the Railway Carriage. 
For Yachting- 
For Men, Women, Children and the 
Baby, f'2.75 to |35, with Hood and 
Girdle complete. 



Ladies' Shirt and Golf Waists, 
$5.00 to $20.00. 

From Madras, Oxfords, Cheviot, French 
Percales, English and French Flannels, 
Silk and Moire Poplin. 



A Special Depariment for 

Ladies' Golf Waist?, 
Bicycle and Golf Skirts, 
Entire Golfing Suits. 

GOLF CLUBS, 
GOLF BALLS and 
CADDY BAGS. 




NOYES BROS. 

Washington and Summer Streets, 

BOSTON, Mass., U. S. A. 



You should call or send for sample of 

King's Royal Bond. 



Most bond papers as good sell for about double the 
price of this. 

Per Quire Five Quires 

?-,K„ 120 Sheets, t <£ . 



25 Envelopes 



J2$C 



100 Envelopes, 5 



This comes in three colors — white, azure and ceru- 
lean blue — and in the very latest fashionable sizes. 

Can Q 1/ 1 n rt> Art Stationer and Engraver. 

UCUi Di fxlllg, 250 Hoylston St., Boston, Mass. 

Calling Cards and Die Stamping a specialty. 



SHOES FOB 
YOUNG LADIES. 

Newest Shapes. Newest Styles for Gi/nt- 
nasintn, Tennis, Walking anil I>ress. 

WIS GIVE TEN PElt CENT. DISCOUNT 
TO AEJL IASEIJL STUDENTS. 

THE HENRY H. 
TUTTLE CO., 

Cor. WASHINGTON and WINTER STS., 
DOS TON. 



DAVIS, CIIAPIN CO. 

J. A. BARKER, President. 

Commission Merchants and Wholesale 
Dealers in Foreign and Domestic 

Fruits and Produce. 

83 and 85 Faneuil Hall Market, 

Cellar 15 South Side, 

Boston, Mass. 

Telephone Haymarket 777. 



MILLS & DEERING, 

Receivers and Dealers in Fine Grades of 

BUTTER 

AND STItlCTIY EltESII EGGS. 

FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

OF WEST NEWTON, MASS. 

James II. Niokerson. I'res. A. R. Mitchell, Vice-Pies. 

Edward 1'. Hatch, Cashier. 

General Banking, Collection and Exchange. 

Capital, $100,000. 
Business hours daily, B.'iO to 12 a m and 1 to 3 p.m. 
Saturdays, 8.30 a. in. to 12 m. Sate deposit hoxes to rent in 
new fire and burglar proof vault. 



206 



LASELL LEAVES 



JOSHUA THORNDIKE. 



CHAS. W. SPEAR 



JOSHUA THORNDIKE & CO. 



DEALERS IN 



MUTTON, LAMB and VEAL 

Stalls 3 and 5 New Faneuil Hall Market, 
BOSTON. MASS. 

Edward E. Babb & Co. 



25 Arch St., Boston, Mass. 

Dealers in 

SCHOOL BOOKS and SCHOOL SUPPLIES 

D. A. HOWE 

273 MAIN STREET, WORCESTER, MASS 

WHOLESALE GROCER. 

Gallons Canned Goods of all kinds and of tlie best 
quality a specialty. Teas and Coffees. 




Roses, 

Carnations, 

Violets, 

Daffodils, 

Forget-me-not, 

Lily oftheValiey 

Auburndale, Mass. 
Telephone. 



Mrs. C. II. HALL, 

DRESSMAKER. 

'Work done at reasonable prices. 

Special rates to students. 

490 AUBURN STREET, AUBURNDALE. 

T rt *£PH r^ 

Bm&*JS h ^^ 

-Urll-^ (co**"*™"-! , , l is3> i ,EiV!li 

w0BksiS& 



issima 
EtVibssiitf, 



y r)^> 



"- \zO* 3& *k^ — ".-=?■ ~^= 



TR^UE. MABU 



FINEST ROAD-BED ON THE CONTINENT. 



Boston and Albany Railroad. 



THROUGH CAR SERVICE IN EFFECT APRIL 20, 1901. 



No. 7 — Leaves Boston at 8.30 a. m. except Sunday. Pullman vestibuled parlor car, Boston to Albany. 
No. 15 — Leaves Boston at 10.45 a. m. daily. Pullman vestibuled buffet library-smoking-car and vestibuled 

sleeping cars. Boston to Chicago, via L. S. & M. S. R. R. to St. Louis via Big Four 

Route. Dining car service. 
No. 19-17 — Leaves Boston at 2.00 p. m. daily. (The North Shore Special) Pullman vestibuled sleeping 

cars, Boston to Cleveland and Chicago. Dining-car service. 
No. 23 — Leaves Boston at 3.30 p. m. except Sunday. Pullman vestibuled sleeping cars, Boston to 

Niagara Falls. Tourist sleeping car Boston to Chicago. 
No. 27 — Leaves Boston at 6.00 p. m. daily. Pullman vestibuled sleeping car, Boston to Cleveland and 

Cincinnati via L. S. & M. S. R. R. ; also Pullman vestibuled sleeping car, Boston to Detroit 

and Chicago via M. C. R. R. 
No. 63 — Leaves Boston at 11.00 p. m., except Saturday. Pullman sleeping car, Boston to Albany, arriv- 
ing at 7.57 a. m. 
For information, maps, time-tables, tickets and accommodations in drawing-room and sleeping cars, 
apply to agents of Boston & Albany Railroad at its several stations. 

J. L. WHITE, City Pass, and Ticket Agent, or to A. S. HANSON, Gen. Pass. Agent. 

The only first-class through line from New England to the West. 



City Ticket Office, 366 Washington St., Boston 



LASELL LEAVES 



207 



BONBON? 
CHOCOLATE? 

Delicious Ice Crearp So<J&. 

45 TREMONT STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 




PLEASE FORWARD GOODS BY 

JOHNSON & KEYES EXPRESS CO. 

AU8URNDALE AND BOSTON EXPRESS. 

Offices: 34 Court Sq., 77 Kingston, 105 Arch Streets 
BO=TON. 

WAUWINET FARM. 

COMMONWEALTH AVE. AND VALENTINE ST., 

WEST NEWTON, MASS. 
All interested in a modern Dairy are invited to visit the Fa;m. 

DEALER IN 

PROVISIONS. 

Corner Auburn and Lexington Streets, 

iITTIIIiiim *i nlini mil 11I1 Mass. 



Established 1830 

Alfred Mudge & Son 
PRINTERS 

24 Franklin Street, Boston 
CLASS PRINTING 

A SPECIALTV 



Andrew -T. Lloyd & Co. 
OPTICIANS 

DOWN-TOWPf-323 Washington St., opp. Old South Church. 

BACK BAY-310 Bojlston St., opp. Arlington St. 

Bring your prescriptions for Eyeglasses and Spectacles to us. 
A complete line of Photographic Goods always in stock. The 
best place in Boston to have your developing and printing 
done. Send for our price list. 

Rockwell and Churchill. 



PRINTERS 

THIRTY-NINE ARCH STREET, 
BOSTON, MASS. 



SCHOOL ANNUALS, 
ANNOUNCEMENTS, 
CATALOGUES. 



PRINTERS OF LASELL CATALOGUE. 



Francis Bachelder. 



F. S. Snyder 



Francis Bafchelder 

Co. 




Beef, Pork, Mutton, Veal, Poultry, 

Game, Hams, Bacon, Lard, Butter, 

Cheese, Eggs, Cream, etc. 

Wholesale 

Provisions and Produce 



Proprietors of CAPITOL CREAMERIES, 

Central Station, Montpelier, Vt. 



Poultry and Egg House, 

Fenton, Michigan. 



Smoke Houses, Sausage Factory, Ham Cooking Fac- 
tory, Cold Storage, etc., 55, 57, 59, 61 and 63 
Blackstone Street, 

Boston, Mass. 



G. L. Lawrence. F. B. Eastman. 

J. P. LAWRENCE & CO., 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

IPoultry, W^ild Game. 

Goods for Shipping a Specialty. 

30 FANEUIL HALL MARKET, BOSTON. 

Telephone, Haymarket 919. 

AdsiiiiN £e Gilbert, 

OPTICIANS. 

A/r ANUPACTURERS of Spectacles and Eye Glasses, and Im- 
ivi porters of Opera, Field and Marine Glasses and Optical 
Goods of every description. Oculists' prescription work a 
specialty. 

165 Tremont Street, Boston. 



208 



LASELL LEAVES 



WOODLAND PARK HOTEL 

AUBURNDALE, MASS. 

Five minutes' walk from Lasell. Open all the year. 
CHAS C. BUTLER. 

HENRY W. GOODWIN, 

75-80 Broad Street, Boston, Mass. 

BRYANT & MAY'S 

LONDON PARLOUR MATCHES- 



Pvefepped Stock 

MOCHA AND JAVA 

COFFEE- 

THE HIGHEST. GRADE OF BLENDED COFFEE. 

ROASTED AND PACKED BY 

Martin L. Hall & Co., 

Boston, Mass. 

Jr WOODWARD 

FISH, OYSTERS, EGGS, CANNED GOODS, 
VEGETABLES, ETC. 

Coi\ Auburn and Ash Sts., Auburndale, Mass. 

BARLOW'S ICE CREAM. 
J. B. SANDER- ON, Proprietor. 

Telephone 261-3. WEST NEWTON, MASS. 

Catering in all its branches at reasonable prices. 



BEEF, PORK, LARD, HAMS, BACON, 
PIGS' FEET and TRIPE. 



STURTEVANT & HALEY 
BEEF and SUPPLY CO 

38 and 40 Faneuil Hall Market, 

BOSTON, MASS. 



TALLOW, STEARINE, 
FINE OLEO, OIL, SCRAP, Etc. 



CHARLES F. HATHAWAY, 

MANUFACTURING BAKER. 



Crackers, Biscuit, Bread, Cake and Pastry. Wholesale 
jobber of Kennedy's Celebrated Crackers. Hathaway's 
original Home-made Cream Bread, best in the world, 
kept by all leading grocers. 

Factories: 100(5 Mass. Ave., Cambridge. 
769 Main Street, Waltham. 



C. F. Hovey & Co. 

33 Summer Street. 
42 Avon Street. 

Boston, IMI^tss. 

Importers of 

Dress Goods, Silks, 
Cloaks, Suits, Laces, 

Underwear, Small Wares. 



W. H. PRIOR. C. A. PRIOR 

PRIOR BROS. 

Successors to Wm. Prior, Jr.. & Co. 
Wholesale and retail dealers in all kinds of 

Ocean, Lake and River Fish, Oysters and Clams 

127 and 129 Faneuil Hall Market, Boston, Mass. 

Telephone, t>73 Hayiuarket. 



T/^tt 1 sold by ns is cut from LougfeHow's Pond, Wellesley 
fCH i Hills." Water from pond is used in Wellesley public 
service. The Newton Ire Co. is piepared to furnish a lirst 
class quality of ZPOKTID ICE in West Newton, Newtoii- 
ville, Auburndale, Newton Lower Falls and Wellesley Hills. 

MILLER & HATCH, Props. 

P. O. Address, Newton Lower Falls. 



A Hardwaie Stoie for a hundred years. 

Bnrditt & Williams 

Dealers in 

Builders' and Geueral|Hardware 
Supplies, Tools and Cutlery. 

20 DOCK SQ., BOSTON. 



LASELL LEAVES 



209 



I5S COLLEGE 
GIRL 

Will always find at our store the LATEST 

CONCEITS IN STATIONERY as well as the other 

necessaries for her college work. 

Economical prices prevail. 



THORP & MARTIN CO. 

FINE STATIONERY SHOP. 

12 MILK STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 

Shreye, Cramp & Low Co. 

147 Tremont St., Boston. 

JEWELERS and SILVERSMITHS. 



STATIONERY, CLASS and SOCIETY PINS. 

Designs submitted and estimates furnished. 



Tbe Knickerbocker 5boe 




Por 

Colleg* 

Girls. 

Enamel 
Oxfords 
for 
Spring. 



Everything ii> Sr>oc5» $3.50. 

E. W. Burt & Co. 

.... 40 West Street. 



Plates in this publication 
were made by 

FOLSOM & SUNERGREN, 

ILLUSTRATORS AND 

ENGRAVERS, 

92 PEARL ST., BOSTON. 



Cobb, Aldrich & Go. 



Corner of Washington and Kneeland Streets, Boston* 



ALWAYS have in stock 

THE NICEST assortment 



CRYSTALLIZED VIOLETS. 
All kinds of French Fruits, Glaces, 
Stuffed Prunes, Salted Almonds, 
Pecans and Peanuts, Violet Sachet, 
Bonbonnierres, French Bonbons, Fancy 
Chocolates, Nougatines, Marshmallow, 
Opera Caramels, etc. 



- CONFECTIONS 

OF THEIR OWN MANUFACTURE 

TO BE FOUND ANYWHERE 



FANCY CRACKERS 

OF EVERY 
DESCRIPTION. 



Also a full line of Stuffed Olives, Pim-Olas, Fancy Pickles, 
Preserves and Condiments especially adapted to Dinner and Evening Parties 



CATALOGUE FORWARDED UPON APPLICATION. 



210 



LASELL LEAVES 



provides every 
convenience 



THE DAYLIGHT STORE 

wammmmm^mam^^mmmmmmmmmmt^a^mmmmmmmmK^^mmmmim^^^^mt^mmmmimmm for satisfac- 

tory shopping — parlor for reading, writing and resting — postoffice — telegraph office — safety eleva- 
tors running to basement and upper floors — every corner thoroughly lighted and ventilated. 
While our effort is to bring an increasing number of customers each day to the various 
departments, yet our desire is to have every purchase and the detail of every transaction so 
conducted by our employees that a feeling of entire satisfaction will accompany each sale. 
Ladies' Outer Garments, Corsets, Underwear and Shoes are prominent everyday features 
of our store. 



GILCHRIST & CO., 



WINTER AND WASHINGTON 
STREETS, ROSTON. 



THE NEW SCALE 

HALLETT & DAVIS 
PIANOS. 

The recognized standard of the musical world. We 
have no hesitancy in saying that our Piano as made 
today is as near a perfect instrument as is possible to 
manufacture. You should try and hear the New Scale 
Hallett & Davis if you are interested in a beautiful 
toned piano. We can surprise you in price, quality 
and tone. 

Established 60 Years. 179 TREMONT STREET. 



C. W. Davidson, Pres. 

Newtonville. 



F. F. Davidson, Treas. 
Auburndale. 



THOMAS LONG COMPANY, 

77 Summer St., Boston. 

GOLDSMITHS AND SILVERSMITHS. 

Special designs always in stock. 

Newest ideas in Jewelry, Sterling Silver, Cut Glass, 
Umbrellas and Pocket-books. 
Repairing a specialty. 
Makers of Class and Society Pins and Golf Prizes. 

Foreign Shirtings for Waists 

BY THE YARD. 



Keep Manufacturing Co. 

Makers of Keep's Shirts. 156 Tremont St., Boston. 

H. B. Thayer 

NEWEST FASHIONS IN SHOES. 

Special discount to students. 
144 TREMONT STREET, BOSTON. 



O 



¥ 



DD THINGS. 



Brooches, 

Hat Pins, 
Buckles, 
Posters, 
Steins, 
Flags. 

387 Washington St., tjt;\TT 2~ T2T TCLJ 

Boston, Mass. JBIiJN 1 ox rSUori. 






ART DEPARTMENT 



AT THE 



SHUMAN CORNER. 



We take pleasure in announcing the opening 
of our Art Department, which we have stocked with 
the most artistic variety of Embroidery, Battenberg, 
Renaissance, and Stamped and Hemstitched Linens. 

Full lines of Embroidery Silks, Battenberg 
Threads and Braids, Duchess Braids, Gilt Braids, 
Patterns, etc. 

We stamp to order any pattern desired. 

A competent teacher will be present to give 
lessons in Embroidery, entirely free of charge, to pur- 
chasers of materials. 

We exhibit in this department a large variety of 
made pillows, including the new Burnt Leather Goods. 
Designs burnt to especial order, a novel bit of treat- 
ment which ladies are invited to witness. 



A. SHUMAN & CO. 

IVORY ROOM. 



tASCLL fc/WES 



ti 



DUX FEA\INA FACTI." 



vol. xxvi 



Lasell Seminary, Auburndale, Mass., June, 1901. 



Number 9 



Published monthly during the School year by the Lasell Publishing Association. 



MARINETTE RAMSDBI.I,, '02. 

Local Editor. 
I.KNA ARMSTRONG. 



Editor-in-chief. 
NELL DAVIS JONES, '03. 

Associate Editors. 
FONNIE E- DAVIS. 

Subscription Agent. 
DORA E- CLARK. 



EVA L. CHANDLER, 'o 



Exchange Editor. 
M. BELL CLOKEY, '02. 



Business Manager. 
ETHLYN F. BARBER '01. 



Asst. Business Manager. 
JOANNA F. DEERING. 



TERMS, in Advance: One copy, one year (including Postage), $1.00. Single copies, 15 cents. 

Editorials. 



AS the year draws to a close it is with a 
feeling mixed with sadness that we 
think of leaving. Even the thought of home 
does not quite make up for leaving the girls. 
For many weeks we have been so closely 
united, that we almost felt it would continue 
indefinitely; but the time has come to say 
good-bye. For those of us who are coming 
back next year, it will be hard not to find the 
Seniors, of whom we have been very proud 
during the past year. Never has there 
gone out from Lasell a class of nobler girls; 
and as they begin their new life we all join 
in wishing that their graduation day may be 
in truth the commencement of all success and 
happiness. 

WE have been sorry to hear of changes 
in our faculty for the next year; 
as our Associate Principal leaves us for larg- 
er fields, we send with him all the good 
wishes of Lasell, but just as warmly welcome 
his successor. 



THE announcement of the departure of 
our English teacher came with a great 
crash. She who has been such a support to 
Lasell for the past few years, takes a year — 
perhaps two — for study and rest. Our 
Latin teacher goes to a post in Wellesley 
College. Her place here will be hard to 
fill. We sincerely wish them both much 
success, and trust they will not forget Lasell 
and their old friends. 

♦ m 

— Of the twelve members of the class of 
'57 there were present at the Semi-Cen- 
tennial banquet on Commencement Day, 
NINE. This would be hard to beat, we 
think, considering the date of their gradua- 
tion. 



For some reason the editors of the May 
Leaves overlooked the joint authorship of 
the latest Lasell song, and the one which we 
hope may touch the popular heart. In two 
places it gave Harriette Ward the credit of 
its making. We gladly make the correc- 
tion, and give, as is due, to Zoe Hill the 
credit of the words, and to Harriette Ward 
that of the music. 



212 



LASELL LEAVES 



Senior Reception. 



THE class receptions at Lasell have al- 
ways been among the most enjoyable 
of the entertainments of the year. From 
the opening of school they are greatly antici- 
pated and are afterward remembered with 
much pleasure. But of all those of the year, 
none quite equals that to which favored ones 
are invited to meet the Senior class. This 
year the reception was one of the most pleas- 
ant ever held at Lasell. 

The parlors were beautifully decorated 
with an abundance of smilax and the class 
flower, marguerites. The Juniors intro- 
duced the Seniors' friends to the reception 
committee, Mr. Bragdon, Miss Carpenter, 
and Miss Barber, the Senior president. Mr. 
Bragdon's cordial welcome at once put all at 
their ease, and the parlors were soon filled 
with a bright and happy company. 

Owing to the limited space of the parlors, 
the gymnasium was made use of, and was 
uniquely decorated. Many little cosy cor- 
ners covered with pillows of all descriptions 
completely transformed the gymnasium, and 
the dim light of the Japanese lanterns made 
one feel as if they were in fairy land. 

The dining-room was also artistically ar- 
ranged, and here refreshments were served 
by the Juniors. 

Altogether, the evening was one of much 
enjoyment to all, and will be long remem- 
bered as one of the "events" of the year. It 
is to the Juniors that we owe much for the 
pleasant evening. Their earnest and faith- 
ful labor in a few hours transformed Lasell 
into a bower of beauty, and we feel that they 
deserve a very fine reception next year. 

Junior Garden Party. 



sort to the gymnasium. This was decorated 
with the class colors and flowers; chairs, 
rugs, cushions and cosy corners were very 
artistically arranged around the room. 
Through the open door floated the lively 
music of the hurdy-gurdy, mingling with the 
gay conversation within. 

When all were seated, the curtain was 
drawn, and Miss Anna Mae Pinkham ren- 
dered a beautiful solo, followed by a garden 
play written by Miss C. Austin and presented 
by eight of the Junior class. The stage was 
decorated with branches to represent a 
woodland bower, and the performers were all 
dressed in the garb representing some wild 
field flower. These were Miss Lotta Hew- 
son as "Trailing Arbutus," Miss M. Hollen- 
beck as "Violet," Miss Florence Hayden as 
"Black- Eyed Susan, or Daisy," Miss K. Ken- 
drick as "Golden Rod," Miss J. Deering as 
"Sweet William," Miss McGregor as "For- 
get-me-not," and the Misses Goodwin and 
Ellen Chase as "Quaker Ladies." 

The play was very interesting and very 
well staged. These little flowers, after 
dancing and singing their fantastic songs, 
decided to go to the laboratory of the 
"giants," of whom they had heard so much. 
How surprised they were to find such things 
there as umbrellas, footballs, golf sticks, and 
other wonders, which they supposed were 
flowers of the "giants." After relating 
how Golden Rod had fallen in love with Vio- 
let, they ended their frolic with a song and 
dance, and tripped out, leaving the audience 
delighted with their charming ways. 

A dainty repast of ice cream, cake and 
strawberries was served, and all left well 
pleased with their entertainment and the 
grand success of the Juniors. 

Commencement Concert. 



THE annual Junior Garden Party was The Commencement concert, given in the 

held Saturday, June I, but on account gymnasium on the evening of June 6th, was, 
of the rain, the Juniors were obliged to re- as might have been expected, the best musi- 



LASELL LEAVES 213 

cal entertainment of the year. The way in most pleasant ever given at Lasell. It was 

which the girls gave their selections showed a reunion of many old members who had 

both talent and perseverance, and reflected come back for Commencement week. Early 

great credit upon their teachers. We surely in the evening the guests met in the parlors 

have reason to be proud of Lasell's musical and some minutes were spent in meeting old 

department. friends. Soon, attracted by gay music, the 

Chorus. Hunting Chorus Hummel guests went down to the dining-room, which 

Hither Fairies Trip Tully was d ecorate( i m tne class flower, the daisy. 

Orphean Club. . 

Pianoforte Duo. Prelude and Fugue Vogt The posts were twined with green, and 

Miss Bowers and Mr. Hills. daisies were heaped on the tables. The ta- 

Songs. a. Lieber Schatz, sei wieder gut mir. . Franz ^les were arranged in the shape of a cross, 

b. My love is like a red, red rose. .Hastings A _, .« , f ,, , . « T ,,. 

M" Dr oer ends of the arms sat the Laselha pres- 

Pianoforte Polonaise Schumann ident, Miss Smith, and the S. D. president, 

Miss E. Chase. Miss Hill. At the two other ends, Miss 
Song. Lift thine eyes (Elijah). By re ^— ^ Skinner, the toastmistress, presided, and op- 
Misses Hill, Gallagher and Hamilton. posite her Miss Barber, senior class presi- 
Organ Sonata in C Minor. (First three move- dent. The banquet itself was greatly en- 

ments ) Mendelssohn j oye d, but the best part of the evening was 

Miss Ward. . . ,,. ~. . , . 

Song. The Throstle Maud Valerie White the toasts - As Mlss Skinner rose, a pleased 

Miss Hill. hush went around the room. After a clever 

Pianoforte duo. Valse lente _ Lazarus introduction, the toastmistress announced 

Miss Clark and Mr. Hills. ,1 (i ^- kT , „ , 1 1 tv/t- -»<!■ 

the Welcome, to be given by Miss Mower. 

PART SECOND. „, ,. , ' , ° .. J , . 

„ , lhe cordial words, delivered in a most 

Violin, a. Prayer Weber . _ 

b Rondo David charming way, made all feel at home. 1 he 

Misses Winn, Blackstock, Hawley, Biddle response for the Seniors was given by Miss 

and Le Seure. Barber, who with her graciousness won the 

Song. He is kind, He is good (Herodiade) Massenet , . , .. r^, ,,. TTM1 

Miss Gallagher. admiration of all. Then Miss Hill 

Pianoforte. Caprice in A Major Hills gave a most interesting toast in verse 

Miss Cole. on "The Scarcity of Men at Lasell," fol- 

Song. Vieille Chanson . . Bizet j owed b d j ^ SQn b Misg whd _ 

Miss Pinkham. J J & J 

Organ, a. Intermezzo Dunham don. The bounty of each season at Lasell 

b. Fanfare Lemmens was cleverly shown by Miss Brooks, and 

Miss Walker. then our ]ittle trials were delightfully told 

Songs, a. L'esclave Lalo . _ . , 

b. The Quest Eleanor Smith of by Miss Dustin, whose merry words cre- 

Miss Hamilton. ated much laughter. Miss Cole gave a 

Pianoforte Quartette. Symphony in C. Minor. striking picture of the future Lasell girl, and 

(First Movement) Gade { f Miss R d , creation 

Misses G. Stone, Lum, Buffinton and Bennett. v J 

Chorus. Down in the Dewey Dell Smart captivated all. The "Farewell" was given 

Orphean Club. by Miss Isabella Clemens in her usual witty 

Society Banquet. manner. Before the banquet closed, im- 
promptu toasts were given by Miss Kather- 

™ , , r .* T „ m11 j„ ru.u ^„a q ine White and Miss Madora Marsh, two 

The banquet of the Laselha Club and S. , , , p „ ,, 

H , , prominent members of last year. By all the 

D. Society, on June seventh, was greatly en- gir]s and honorary mem bers, the banquet 

joyed by all the guests, and was one of the was pronounced a decided success. 



Boiled Salmon and Green Peas 
Cucumbers 



2I 4 LASELL LEAVES 

The menu was as follows: Co. B "fell in," all full of eagerness to do 

Bouillon their well-trained best for the dearest cap- 
tain that ever commanded a company; who 

Chicken Croquettes~and Peas could do otherwise than work to win under 

Rolls the guidance and faithful training of such a 

Lettuce and Tomato Salad leader as Captain Floss Plum? After Co. 
Olives 

Frozen Pudding ^' t ^ ie J un i° r prize squad showed how the 

Strawberries and Cream well trained individual goes to make up the 
Assorted Cake perfect company. Company C, under corn- 
Drill Day. mand of Captain Mabel Martin, showed a 
new course of training for second year 

IN spite of our fears, and the rainy days work, a course in manual of arms instead of 
preceding, Drill Day this year was just the bayonet drill, as in the past. The offi- 
such a day as we would have chosen; clear, cers' sabre drill, next, was commanded by 
but not too warm. The lawn and crow's Captain Adjutant Harris and exhibited some 
nest were gay with happy school girls and excellent training, and also showed the great 
their friends on this first day of Commence- advantage of the new steel sabres over the 
ment week. All through the trees and in wooden ones, which have been the trial of the 
the windows floated the red, yellow and blue officers in former years. The senior prize 
bunting, no rivalry for place this year, but squad followed, commanded by Captain 
all prettily draped together, yellow for Co. Martin. Then the prettiest feature of the 
A, red for Co. B, and blue for Co. C. At day, the Battalion Parade, under command 
three the orchestra started to play, and soon of Captain Gallagher, as acting major, closed 
the excited but well trained girl-soldiers of the successful programme of the day. Then 
Co. A were told to "fall in." After First the girls seemed real soldiers, as marching in 
Sergeant Ida Mallory had brought the com- the three companies, commanded by their re- 
pany to position and called the roll, the cap- spective lieutenants, they passed in review 
tain took command and with her clear, strong before their captains and major, with the 
voice directed her company and took them colors flying in the front rank of Co. B. 
through the manual of arms, amid the cheers The flag was carried by Standard Bearer 
of the onlookers. It was easy to see that Sue T. Lair. After much deliberation on 
the company had been in excellent training the part of the judges, who had hard work 
and had learned to work together as one un- to determine between the companies on ac- 
der the direction of their competent and most count of their most excellent practice, the 
faithful captain, Ethel Gallagher. When following prizes were awarded while the bat- 
Co A was dismissed amid the cheers of all talion stood at attention : Prize banner, Co. 
and the clashing of the many little souvenir B, Captain Floss Plum, Indianapolis, Ind. 
swords, the orchestra played again. As they Senior squad, first prize, Bessie Sanger 
played two merry friends of Co. B. led across Krag, Columbus, Ohio. Junior squad, first 
the drill ground a black goat, the mascot of prize, Ethel Kile Rozelle, Concord, N. H. ; 
Co. B. His majesty seemed not to mind second prize, Edith Eloise Sisson, Bingham- 
his decoration of red bunting nor the beating ton, N. Y. Sabre drill, first prize, Ida Min- 
of Co. B's small souvenir drums, but be- nie Mallory. Franklin, Pa.; second prize, 
haved in a true mascotly manner. Then Georgie Mayhew Duncan, Bath, Me. Hon- 



LASELL LEAVES 



215 



orable mention, senior squad, Ida Mallory; 
junior squad, Sarah Dyer; sabre drill, Bes- 
sie Krag. 



Baccalaureate Sermon. 



A more beautiful Baccalaureate Sunday 
could not have dawned than June 
ninth; and it was indeed a fitting ending for 
the helpful year which had passed. A hap- 
py procession walked from Lasell to the 
church preceded by the Faculty. The church 
was decorated with yellow and white bunt- 
ing, the class colors, and marguerites, the 
flower. At the back of the pulpit hung the 
handsomely embroidered class banner. All 
this harmonized well with the service which 
followed. The sermon was given by Prof. 
S. F. Upham, D. D., LL. D., of Drew Theo- 
logical Seminary, Madison, New Jersey. 
He was assisted in the service by Rev. Mr. 
Southgate, Rev. Mr. Worth and Bishop W. 
F. Mallalieu of Auburndale. The text was 
found in Psalms 61 : 1-2, "Hear my cry, O 
God; attend unto my prayer. From the 
end of the earth will I cry unto thee, when 
my heart is overwhelmed; lead me to the 
Rock that is higher than I." 

The helpful thoughts might be summed up 
in the following : Once there was a castle 
and near it was a large rock. The owner 
of this castle had wires connect the two, thus 
making an ^Eolian harp. The winds played 
over them in the summer, however, and no 
music was produced ; but when the storms of 
winter came, and heavy winds played upon 
the wires, wonderful music came therefrom. 
So it is with us. There are the human 
chords of sympathy and affection, and when 
the storms come into our lives, these chords 
sound. 

A modern literary critic says that "the 
poets' finest works are productions in mo- 
ments of sorrow." Everyone is acquainted 



with Milton's "Paradise Lost," and it is a 
liberal education for one to know it, and yet 
Milton's blindness was the cause of some of 
his finest passages. We all know that fa- 
mous hymn of Cowper's, which was written 
when he knew an attack of insanity was 
about to come to him : 

"God moves in a mysterious way, 

His wonders to perform, 
He plants his footsteps in the sea, 
And rides upon the storm." 

So when David sang this Psalm, he was 
troubled. Absalom had planned a revolt. 
David had been compelled to leave his home 
and he knew not what was coming. A 
weight was upon him, but in all this great 
storm of life he was able to say, "Lead me 
to the Rock that is higher than I." When 
Paul and Silas were in prison, with nothing 
surrounding them but bare walls and the bars 
of the prison door, certainly the storm of life 
had come upon them, and yet I have no 
doubt but what they sang this Psalm of Da- 
vid's. The Psalms are today like so many 
speaking-tubes in every chamber of sorrow, 
through which we cry unto God. 

"Life" is the instinctive cry of humanity. 
One time I was on a train and a man came 
and sat in the seat with me. I suppose he no- 
ticed by my dress that I was a clergyman, 
for very soon he began to talk on religious 
subjects. He said he was not an atheist, 
because he believed in God; but he did not 
believe in prayer, and he repeated several 
times that he did not believe in a hereafter. 
When the train reached its destination and 
we went to get off, I noticed a band of 
mourning on his hat. I turned to him and 
asked him if he had lost a friend. He 
turned to me, his lip quivered, and he 
said, "Yes, my wife died a few weeks ago 
and she is in heaven now." So I found a 
way to that man's heart and I found that, 
after all, 'way down deep in his heart he be- 
lieved in a life eternal. 



2l6 



LASELL LEAVES 



Every man has the instinct of prayer. He 
may not show it, but it is there and has only 
to be found. Let me take for an illustration 
Peter in prison. Not far from that prison 
is a little company gathered together to pray. 
They are earnestly and humbly praying to 
God that Peter might be taken from prison. 
They know not how, but leave it wholly in 
God's hands, and in the night an angel came 
and took Peter out, and their prayer was 
answered. For another illustration take a 
calm, bright morning, a little party going 
out for a day's outing. On the water all 
is peaceful and quiet. It is a very gay party 
and perhaps many things are said which are 
not pleasing to God. In the middle of the 
afternoon the wind begins to blow; a storm 
is coming on; peals of thunder are heard, 
and their little boat is tossing with the waves. 
The party sees there is danger and instinc- 
tively a prayer goes forth from each of those 
hearts. 

David's cry was mysterious. He was 
alone and talking with One whose face he 
had never seen and whose voice he had never 
heard. It was mysterious. So is our talk- 
ing with one another mysterious. I stand 
facing you and throw out words into the air, 
and they come to you. This is the finite 
talking with the finite. But when a man 
is in his closet alone, he knows there is no 
human voice to hear him, no human eye to 
see him. Then it is the finite talking with 
the Infinite. Prayer is the speaking to God 
at any time, in any place, on any subject. 

How often you hear this objection to 
prayer: It is an interference with nature. 
How do you know? What ground have 
you for that statement ? The law of nature 
is that rain will wet you, but you can have a 
roof between you and the rain. You do not 
consider the roof an interference with this 
law of nature. No more is prayer an in- 
terference with any law of nature. 



Does God care for the individual? Let 
us see by this illustration: There is a ship, 
behind that ship is a small boat, and in the 
boat is a man holding an end of a rope in 
his hand. The other end of this rope is 
fastened to the ship, and no matter how hard 
the man pulls, he cannot make the ship come 
to him, but he can come to the ship. Man 
is not insignificant. He has but to reach 
out to God, and God will draw him near to 
Himself, and prayer is the connecting link 
between him and God, and is the rope to 
which the man can cling and thus pull him- 
self to God. No place is so accessible as 
the throne of Grace. 



Class Night. 



AT last the long looked for Class Night, 
with all its pleasant surprises, has 
come and gone. The Seniors of '01 may 
well be proud of the success which was the 
result of patient and untiring energy. Long 
before seven o'clock the gymnasium began 
to fill up with expectant relatives, friends 
and classmates, and by eight all were in their 
places, awaiting the coming of the Seniors. 
In they came, a stately procession of sixteen 
noble girls, bearing on their shoulders daisy 
chains and singing as they went. On they 
marched until the front was reached, when 
the files parted, going to either side; there 
the Juniors received the daisy chains, and the 
two bands of Seniors united to form a semi- 
circle across the stage. After the song was 
finished and all had taken their places, Eth- 
lyn Barber, their beloved president, stepped 
forward and gave us one and all a hearty 
welcome. Now that Class Night had truly 
begun, we were glad to hear Zoe Hill's "Roll 
Call." All were present and appeared when 
called for. Feeling it was necessary to give 
"A Word to the Wise," Isabella Clemens, 



LASELL LEAVES 



217 



our philosopher, gave her friends several 
good suggestions, such as : petitions should 
be drawn up with great tact; walks should 
be cut to obtain the privilege of gymnasium, 
and Roman History should not be neglected. 
For fear such sound advice might be lost if 
not allowed time to be absorbed, the Seniors 
sang, "Oh, We are Sixteen Seniors." 

Now followed a solemn event, which sol- 
emnity we were all able to appreciate after 
our Law lectures, for it was nothing more 
or less than the drawing up of the "Last 
"Will and Testament of 1901" by Edith Dus- 
tin, and signed by Harriette Ward, Lelia 
Walker and Katherine McCoy. It was 
thoughtful of the Seniors to think of us at a 
time of such importance, and we wish to 
thank them for the appropriate gifts, the 
Junior president receiving a cap and gown, 
Mollie Mower will not need to tramp around 
Boston after bargains, thanks to her Bargain 
Columns, and Edith Pearson was thought- 
fully provided with samples and hair-tonic. 

Ina Scott next gave the "Class Prophecy." 
We all enjoyed seeing Ethlyn as an old maid, 
Cleora as a Red Cross nurse and Edith Dus- 
tin looked like her own dear self. The three 
athletic girls, Zoe, the famous rider, Har- 
riette, a crack sportsman, and Floss, whose 
husband is an admiral. 

/ "Non Nobis Solum" the class motto, was, 
shall I say, well explained by Florence Plum. 
She ended her talk by presenting the school 
with an elegant silver loving-cup, which is to 
be used at all future Class Nights/ Then 
our Bessie Lum told us in such a dear man- 
ner the Seniors' "Farewell," which was fol- 
lowed by a song. 

Hastening out to the lawn, which was 
brilliantly lighted by electric lights scattered 
among the dark foliage, along the banks of 
the drive, along the porch, and collected to 
form an "01" on the front bank, we saw the 
Seniors and their "supes " After marching 



around the lawn, Ethel Gallagher gave to 
the Juniors the bench near the front porch 
as the "Senior Seat." Her address, "You're 
Naughty Two," was given while the proces- 
sion halted around this seat. Then came 
the "Last Rites and Ceremonies" around the 
bonfire. Margaret Fisher as speaker, called 
each girl by name to sacrifice some treasure 
of her school years. Many were the inter- 
esting and amusing gifts. Ina Scott has 
caused a loss to the world by burning her art 
studies, while Zoe Hill sacrificed all the Sen- 
ior privileges which had been gained by a 
petition which was read and burned by Bes- 
sie Lum. But the greatest of all was that 
of Floss Plum, who as she threw her Roman 
History on the fire, exclaimed "Rome, Rome, 
thou hast been a tender nurse to me." After 
singing another song, the Seniors seated 
themselves around the fire and drank from 
the loving-cup. Lastly was sung a song, 
"We 're Going," written for the music of 
"Old Black Joe." Thus ended the Class 
Night of '01. 

m m 

Roll Call of the Class of '01. 



I. 

Listen, my children, and you shall hear 
Of the wonderful class of this very year L 
On the eleventh of June, in naughty-one, 
The very smartest class under the sun, 
Graduates from Lasell, their school so dear. 

II. 

I tell you, my friends, if this class would but start 
To show you the wonderful members within it, 
Your breath would come fast; so, the beats of your 

heart, 
And your wonder would cease that I 'm proud to be 

in it. 
Our president grand will first stand before you. 
I tell you, dear people, she 's beaten by few. 
Her name it is Barber, the locket she wears, 
To open and look into, nobody dares. 

III. 

Next on our list is a girl, who by some 
Is considered a maiden most wise and sedate. 
Let me introduce to you Miss Betsy Ann Lum. 
To taste of her cooking may it soon be your fate. 



2l8 



LASELL LEAVES 



Tho' rainy the weather, a small Pooler two 
Won't keep her away when at class she is due. 
In Bible especially she 's a bright light, 
She shines in her lessons, yet goes out at night. 

IV. 
No fisher of minnows, this naughty one, sure, 
Who takes squelches so sweetly, she deserves a gold 

badge. 
With her line and her fly 't is big game she '11 allure, 
This heart-breaking, cake-making, squelch-taking 

Madge. 
Then a maiden from Texas ; she paints for the class. 
A gay poster printer, an artistic lass. 
Who is she, pray tell you, this maiden much sought? 
She 's one of our number ; here she comes, "O great 

Scott." 

V. 

"Issy," the critic, debater so grand, 

Her glasses and stature, her nature belie. 

She laughs and she giggles behind her white hand, 

This dignified Senior, our smart Clemens, I. 

A kitten we have, who, although very small, 

In the size of her brain she has beaten us all. 

Kid McCoy, you have heard of that person, no doubt, 

Best not quarrel with her, she 's a champion stout. 

VI. 

Now comes Mabel Martin, a girl whom we all 
Consider in physical culture a queen. 
At all times of night she roams through the hall, 
Yet no teacher this reckless young maiden has seen. 
Next comes a maid fond of high stocks and curls, 
Wise sayings fall from her mouth like rare pearls. 
To her drill maidens all she 's a joy and a spur, 
Loud rings the shout, "Let her go, Gallagher." 

VII. 
A girl of pure gold is our true Lelia Walker, 
If you want a rare treat, you should just hear her 

play. 
She 's not much of a brag, nor yet a great talker, 
let the organ speak for her, by night or by day. 
This maiden you see is the life of our table, 
To get words in edgewise, no one else is e'er able. 
With knowledge and secrets this maiden is bustin', 
This wee little, queer little, dear little Dustin. 

VIII. 

This girl, my dear people, to join us was last. 

Her name is Cleora Jane Peabody Brooks. 

'T would have been a great grief to us had she not 

passed. 
We like her ambition, as well as her looks. 
Here is a girl whom I know you '11 agree 
Is jolly as ever a maiden can be; 
She smiles, and she smiles, and she never is glum, 
Of this whole class she's our sweet sugar "Plum." 



IX. 

Here 's another small maid who worked hard for our 

class, 
She 's like a young bird, always bobbing her head. 
She has one great failing, over which I can 't pass, 
Harriette Ward will be good, if on sugar she 's fed. 
Marian, Marian, why hasten so? 
The bell only rang just an hour ago. 
Don't worry, my dear, the teachers can wait; 
For, you know, they know truly. Cole never is late. 

X. 

And now comes the last and the least of us girls, 
In writing and speaking she has little skill. 
Her audience quakes when her sweet voice she hurls, 
This new Sarah Bernhardt, renowned Hamlet Hills. 
Our class as a whole is a wondrous fine crowd. 
We' re neither too quiet, nor are we too loud. 
There are some of us weighty, and some of us lean, 
And taken together, we 're just sweet sixteen. 



The Following are the Songs Sung. 
I. 

At last this year has reached its close, 

And we sad Seniors are, 

For all is o'er nor as before 

We '11 work and study more. 

But still as Seniors true we '11 be, 

And not forget our school. 

We '11 sing it here 

With right good cheer, 

We '11 not forget Lasell. 

Chorus. 

Oh, dear Lasell, 

We love thee well, 

And e'er for thee our praise shall tell. 

How dear thou art 

To each girl's heart; 

We wish we did not have to part. 

II. 

We wonder now what we shall do, 

But yet we cannot tell. 

Our school days here we 've spent with cheer 

And they will be most dear. 

But now as we at last must part, 

Though sad each heart must be, 

We '11 sing it here, 

With right good cheer, 

We '11 not forget Lasell. 

III. 
We thank our teachers for their care, 
For they have been most kind. 
Our schoolmates whom we love so well 
We hate to leave behind. 
Within our hearts a love we find 
For all that's in this school; 



LASELL LEAVES 



219 



We '11 sing it here, 
With right good cheer, 
We '11 not forget Lasell. 
Sung "To Charity" from "Miss Simplicity." 

Oh, we are sixteen Seniors, 

And we feel so very gay, 
For Class night now has come at last, 

And soon we '11 go away. 
We carry here a daisy chain 

Just for a pretty sight; 
Our class flower is a marguerite, 

Our colors gold and white. 

Chorus. 

Now at last we '11 graduate, 

Diplomas we '11 have soon ; 
We thought so many times this year 

We 'd surely meet our doom. 
Our Roman History it was hard, 

Our English, too, alack ! 
But if you said we would not win 

You 'd better take it back. 
Chorus. 

Naughty Ones, they are all right, 

You'll find it ever true; 
There only are sixteen of us, 

But yet we are not so few. 
The teachers tried to scare us — 

Said for study we had no knack, 
But if you said we would not win, 

You 'd better take it back. 

Chorus. 
We 've studied Lit. and Logic, 

Both Bible, French, and Art, 
And now as we have learned so much, 

We think we '11 make a start. 
And then, besides, we learned to float, 

And so you must n't talk ; 
We '11 sail on all the rest of life 

And never have to walk. 

Chorus. 

We gave a little play one night, 

Which really showed our knack. 
It brought us fifty dollars, 

And now we '11 give it back. 
For in our will we 've left some things 

We 've chosen with fine tact. 
But if you do not like our gifts, 

Why, you can give them back. 

Sung to "You 'd Better Take It Back," from "Miss 
Simplicity." 



All the other classes had such lovely names; 

Ours the only naughty one. 

When next year we 're no longer here, 

Naughty Ones will be forgotten. 

All the other classes are so very good ; 

Ours the only naughty one. 



Sung to "Old Black Joe, "Around the Camp Fire. 

Gone are the days when we first met here so gay; 
Gone are the days with the end so far away. 
Into the past they slip as on this night 
We leave our Alma Mater for the world's great fight. 

Chorus. 

We 're going, we 're going. 

From the school we love so well. 

We '11 always have a memory sweet 

Of dear Lasell. 

Gone are the days of our jolly Junior year. 
We suped and worked for the other Seniors dear. 
What happy days looking forward to the goal, 
So steadily advancing as the moments roll. 

Chorus. 
Gone are the days of our Senior year so bright, 
How dear to us they are upon this night 
We 've studied hard to learn our lessons well, 
And as we leave, we '11 give a cheer for dear Lasell. 

Chorus. 

Commencement Day. 



Sung as the Class Marched Out. 

We're the ones, the very Naughty Ones, 
That have caused you so much trouble. 



THE Commencement exercises were held 
at the Congregational church in the 
afternoon of Tuesday, June 11. After the 
opening prayer, Mrs. Thompson, an old La- 
sell girl (Sadie Hollingsworth) sang very 
sweetly several songs. Rev. S. Parkes Cad- 
man, the speaker of the afternoon, a well- 
known clergyman of Brooklyn, gave us a 
most interesting talk. He spoke upon the 
Puritan's message to the twentieth century, 
and his words were most helpful and uplift- 
ing. He showed us the greatness of Puri- 
tanism, and the sterling qualities of the Puri- 
tan stock. We were made to realize that a 
country may have learning of the highest 
sort, may excel in all the fine arts, may be in 
advance of other nations in many of the 
things that tend to make a nation great, and 
still decline and fall. The reason of this is 



220 LASELL LEAVES 

that such countries lack that faith which financially embarrassed, and how Mr. Brag- 
America had so strongly marked in her first don became its principal and rescued it from 
settlers; and the message of these Puritans its impending insolvency, establishing it on 
to us is, "Be true to yourself, be true to your a firm foundation and carrying it on to its 
fellowmen, be true to your God." In the present successful condition. Mr. Alfred 
special address to the graduating class, Dr. Hemenway, who was to speak upon the sub- 
Cadman said, "Members of the graduating ject of "Law," was unexpectedly absent. 
class of 1901, sixty-three years ago a young Mrs. Ellen H. Richards, of the Institute of 
girl no older than you, and younger than Technology, responded to the toast, "The 
many of you, was crowned at Westminster Economic Woman — Her Future." The 
Abbey. ... As this girl queen of future of this woman (in none so well rep- 
eighteen received the crown she said, T will resented as in Mrs. Richards herself), the 
maintain, God being my help.' .... scientifically trained woman, she believed to 
When this good Queen Victoria died the be emphatically the woman of the future. 
people said, "She has maintained." Can you To Mr. Bragdon she paid the fine compli- 
maintain as she did?" After this the class ment of saying that though she had herself 
came forward, and Mr. Bragdon presented often wavered in her belief that it is the best 
the diplomas; the benediction was then pro- thing to bring the kitchen into the class- 
nounced. room, to make the ordinary work of the 
/ At five o'clock came the banquet, given by home the subject of scientific study, he nev- 
the Seminary in celebration of the comple- er had. Rev. Dr. A. B. Kendig, in his 
tion of its fiftieth year. Mr. George L. speech on "How I Know It," told what 
Briggs and Miss Lilla M. Briggs, children of splendid things Lasell did for his own daugh- 
former Principal Briggs, were present, as ters, who were educated here; and Rev. Dr. 
were also Miss Louise Lasell and Mrs. El- F. N. Peloubet amusingly remarked on La- 
len Lasell Gould, children of the founder, sell's many excellences as a next-door neigh- 
Edward Lasell. There were in attendance bor. Bishop W. F. Mallalieu, responding 
a large number of the alumnae, the oldest be- to the toast, "Better to Come," emphasized 
ing Mrs. Whitin, of the class of '55, and the value of the good home to the indivdual, 
many of the friends and patrons of the to the community, to the nation. Mrs. 
school. V Whitin, being called upon for a few words, 
An appetizing feast was provided, after responded very briefly, her friend, Miss 
which Miss Lillie Rose Potter, class of '80, Louise Manning Hodgkins, supplementing 
acted as toastmistress. Mrs. Isabella Jen- her words in a short, bright speech. Mrs. 
nings Parker, class of '57, spoke of the "La- Mary A. Livermore, speaking of present 
sell of Earlier Time," giving various pleas- lacks, told with much interest certain exper- 
ant reminiscences of the early days of the iences of hers in her youthful efforts to se- 
Seminary, dwelling especially upon the lov- cure a liberal education; of her doubts, in 
able characters of the two earliest principals, earlier days, as to the wisdom of Lasell's 
Mr. Edward F. Porter, one of the trustees ideas of making the study of cookery a part 
at the time when Mr. Bragdon entered upon f the work to be done in school, and of her 
the principalship in '74, spoke about "The subsequent belief that it was really a good 
Old and the New," giving some account of thing to do this, 
the manner in which the school came to be Dr. Bragdon then made a short speech, in 



LASELL LEAVES 221 

which he paid a fine tribute to Miss Caroline hand organ thrown in for good measure — 
A. Carpenter and Miss Angeline C. Blais- all going at one and the same time, 
dell, both invaluable assistants ever since he The fact is that one of the pleasantest 
first took charge of the school in 1874, and things about being a neighbor to Lasell is 
to Mrs. H. N. Noyes, of Andover, who had connected with the sweet sounds that come 
for years helped him by wise counsel and ef- through the trees. I have been told that 
fective co-operation. He introduced Mr. somewhere in the upper air there is a certain 
George F. Jewett, of Youngstown, O., as As- point where all the sounds of earth; the cries 
sociate principal of Lasell. Mr. Jewett of the beggars; the rattle of the wagons; the 
briefly responded, saying that he should en- shouts of the boys; the whistle of the en- 
deavor to act in this capacity in accordance gines; the barking of dogs, and the sing- 
with the methods and principles so ing of the birds, are in perfect harmony, 
long recognized at Lasell. That point so far as Lasell is concerned is 
y An interesting feature of the celebration exactly at my house, 
was the presentation by the alumnae, to the Then in the early summer evenings, when 
school, of fine portraits of Edward Lasell, the girls gather on the front lawn in beauti- 
the founder, and of Mr. Briggs, the first ful dresses and gay ribbons, they make me 
principal. The widow of Mr. Josiah La- think of the picturesque word by which St. 
sell had presented a portrait of her husband, Mark describes the crowds upon the grassy 
and Dr. Cushing lately sent his, so that the plain where Jesus fed the 5,000, as parterres 
school has now fine pictures of four of its of flowers. It is a very attractive display, 
former principals. / And with the golf course, and the stories of 

the lost ball, and a free invitation to play, 



Dr. Peloubet's Response to the Toast, 
"Lasell as a Next Door Neighbor." 



there is much that is charming. After 

eleven years' residence as a neighbor of La- 

THE old Greek is said to have placed a sell, I think of the story of the little girl who 

higher price upon his house because of asked her father, who was somewhat old and 

its neighbors. And certainly if I were com- homely, "Did God make you?" "Yes." 

pelled to sell my house, the first inducement "And did he make mother?" (who was 

I would offer to a buyer would be that it is young and handsome). "Yes." "Well, 

close to Lasell, which spreads before my win- how much he has improved!" I think it 

dows its well kept lawn and noble trees, and must have been the family to which the pre- 

its lighted windows brightening the evening vious speaker referred. (Audience, "oh! 

view with its stars. oh !" Then I forgot that he was speaking of 

When I thought of buying the lot where himself. I am like the man Frank Beard 

my house stands, I was several times warned speaks of, "He never opens his mouth but he 

against it on account of the music lessons at puts his foot in it.") 

Lasell. A piano in this room would be As I was coming from the services this af- 
playing a sonata of Beethoven, and in that ternoon I noticed one of the essays was en- 
room a concerto of Chopin, and in a third, titled the "Gospel of the Quiet Hour." I 
the anvil chorus; while overhead a soloist know the essay must be as good as the sub- 
would be training her voice to vie with Patti, ject. But if Miss Mabel Martin, the writer 
on the piazza below a group of girls would be f it, will come to my house a week from to- 
singing college songs, with an occasional night and note the deserted lawns and the 



22° 



LASELL LEAVES 



dark windows and the stillness that can be felt, 
she will have some new impressions about the 
quiet hour. For my part, I sympathize with 
the reply of Dr. Tyng, of New York, to a 
gentleman who wanted to join his church in 
order to be at rest the remaining years of his 
life. The Dr. told him that he had better 
join the church of the Heavenly Rest, as his 
church was the church of the Earthly Activi- 
ties. Give me the activities of my neighbor 
Lasell, rather than the quiet hours after 
Commencement. 

"Oh ! solitudes, where are the charms 
That sages have found in thy face ! 

I'd rather dwell in the midst of alarms, 
(From stray golf balls!) 
Than look at that desolate place !" 

In conclusion I will give a toast. Dr. Geo. 
Gordon began one of his Lowell lectures, not 
long ago, with the story of the prayer of a 
Presbyterian minister for the Queen of Eng- 
land in her presence at the church : "May 
our Queen, as she grows to be an old woman, 
become a new man, and in all works of right- 
eousness may she go forth before her people 
like a he-goat upon the mountains." Such 
is the toast I would give to Lasell. And you 
will understand its meaning better if you will 
turn to Proverbs 30 : 31, and see that the he- 
goat is one of four things that have the 
strength and beauty of healthy activity, and 
are "comely in their going." 

And of your beloved principal, may I say 

in the words of the Duke of Buckingham 

about his king : 

"May he live 
Longer than I have time to tell his years; 
Ever beloved, and loving, may his rule be; 
And when old Time shall lead him to his end. 
Goodness and he fill up one monument." 



treasurer, Miss Ruth Rishell, '99; executive 
committee, Miss Martha Lucas, '60, Miss 
Lillian Packard, '83, Miss Jessie Macmillan, 
'82, Mrs. F. D. Sampson, '57, Miss Lillie R. 
Potter, '80. 



At the Business meeting of the Alumnae, 
the following officers were elected : Pres- 
ident, Mrs. C. E. Parker, '57; vice presi- 
dents, Miss Edith Gale, '89, Mrs. G. D. Gil- 
man, '67; secretary, Miss Grace Loud, '95; 



Former Pupils at Commencement. 

Sarah Pratt Whitin, '55, Whitinsville ; Mary P. 
Jones, '56, Newton; Fanny Gray Merrick, '56, Wal- 
pole ; Mary Shaw Rogers, '56, St. Louis, Mo. ; Martha 
E. Stone, '56, Newton Centre; Charl A. K. Ban- 
croft, '57, Wellesley Hills; Fannie Sykes Davis, '57, 
Newton Centre; Adelaide Sears Gilman, '57, Newton; 
Emma Sears May, '57, Newton; Sarah Hills Hitch- 
cock, '57, Newton; Abbie Hills Holbrook, '57, New- 
ton; Isabel Jennings Parker, '57, Auburndale; Flora 
Drew Sampson, '57, Newton; Carrie Spear, '57, New- 
ton, Susan Hall, Blount, '60, Wellesley; Lucy Rogers 
Gove '60, Minneapolis, Minn. ; Martha B. Lucas, '60, 
Boston; Caroline Hills Leeds, '61, Newton; Rosaella 
Perkins Cook, '66, Natick; Angeline C. Blaisdell, 
'67, Auburndale ; Sarah F. Boynton, '67, Allston ; Ella 
Richardson Cushing, '73, Boston; Marion E. Gil- 
more, '76, Cambridge; Jennie Darling Folsom, '78, 
Lyndonville, Vt. ; Carrie Kendig Kellogg, '79, Brook- 
line; Irene G. Sanford, '79, Boston; Lucy E. Curtis, 
'80, Rockland; Lillie R. Potter, '80, Boston; Sophie 
Mason Dumas, '83, Lowell ; Lillian M. Packard, '83, 
South Boston; Nellie Packard Draper, '84, West- 
ford ; Lillie Fuller Merriam, '85, South Framingham ; 
Blanche Ford Hill, '86, Boston; Mosetta Stafford 
Vaughan, '86, Watertown; Annie M. Gwinnell, '88, 
Newark, N. J. ; Elizabeth Eddy Holden, '88, Dorches- 
ter; Nettie F. Woodbury, '91, Beverly; Mary P. 
Witherbee, '92, Laurel, Del. ; Jennie Arnold Felt, '93, 
Peabody; Nellie M. Richards, '93, Groton; Dasie A. 
Hartson, '94, Napa, Cal. ; K. Belle Bragdon, '95, Au- 
burndale; Grace E. Loud, '95, Everett; Mabel M. 
Lutes, '95, Indianapolis, Ind. ; Mabel Sawyer Rogers, 
'95, Newton Centre; Josephine B. Chandler, '96, 
Maiden ; Annie F. Cushing, '96, Foxcroft, Me. ; Bes- 
sie S. Hayward, '96, Temple, N. H. ; Edith A. Dres- 
ser, '97, Charlotte, N. C. ; Nellie J. Feagles, '97, 
Toledo, O. ; Grace P. Washburn, '97, Melrose ; Car- 
rie Kendall, '98, Leominster; Alice A. Kimball, '98, 
Presque Isle, Me. ; Ruth K. Merriam, '98, Meriden, 
Conn. ; Emily A. Bissell, '99, Rockville, Conn. ; Em- 
ma F. Cleaves, '99, Pigeon Cove; Mabel Currie Hill, 
'99, Norwalk, Conn. ; Ethel Johnson, '99, Hailowell, 
Me. ; Katherine S. Mason, '99, Boone, la. ; Edith F. 
Moulton, '99, Salem; Helen Rishell, '99, Newton- 
ville; Ruth Rishell, '99, Newtonville; Elise E. Scott, 
'99, Chestnut Hill; Mary B. Vance, '99, Cambridge; 
Gertrude Watson Linscott, '99, North Woburn; 
Alice Ashley, '00, Norwood, N. Y. ; Ella B. Cotton, 



LASELL LEAVES 



223 



'00, Omaha, Neb. ; Agnes Flaherty, '00, Massena, N. 
Y. ; Blanche E. Gardner, '00, Wilkes Barre, Pa. ; An- 
nie E. Ives, '00, Meriden, Conn. ; Helen M. Ramsdell, 
'00, Woburn, Mass. ; Eva S. Raymond, '00, Salem, 
Mass.; Elsie Reynolds, '00, E. Haddam, Conn.; 
Katherine V. White, '00, Parkersburg, W. Va. ; Ed- 
na Cooke, W. Winsted, Conn. ; Elsie F. Clarke, Fair- 
haven; Annie Clark, Cambridge; Nellie Chamber- 
layne, Cazenovia, N. Y. ; Elizabeth Cossar, 
Manchester, N. H. ; Helen Deering, Saco, 
Me. ; Myra Davis, Weston ; Mabel Eager, 
Auburndale; Mabelle Gamwell, Pittsfield; 
Clarissa Hammond, Lyons, N. Y. ; Marion Harrow- 
er, Wilkes Barre, Pa. ; Georgie Lord, Irvington-on- 
Hudson, N. Y. ; Bertha Metcalf, Plainville ; Madora 
Marsh, Glens Falls, N. Y. ; Katherine Moses, Saco, 
Me. ; May E. Merrill, South Framingham ; Mrs. Pliny 
Nickerson, Newton Highlands ; Alberta Peck, Col- 
chester, Conn. ; Alice Taylor Potter, New- 
ton Centre ; Bertha Sheldon, Providence, R. 
I. ; Edith Locke Slaten ; Harriet Sawyer, 
Brookline ; Marion Safford, Sharon ; Marion 
Stafford, Fall River ; Margaret Tarr, Gloucester ; 
Helen Wiedenmayer, Newark, N. J. ; Eleanor Waite, 
West Newton ; Grace Wells, Kingston, R. I. ; Elsie 
Woodbury, Beverly ; Frances Wood, Worcester ; 
Sade Hollingsworth Thompson, Evansville, Ind. ; 
Clara Robbins, Nashua, N. H. ; Clementina Butler, 
Newton Centre; Lina Maynard Bramhall, Lowell; 
Nellie Briggs, Somerville. 

» m 

Club Notes. 




NEXT YEAR. 

President Miss Marion Mann 

Vice President Miss Frances Leavitt 

Secretary Miss Mabel Goodwin 

Treasurer Miss Bessie Draper 

Executive Com Misses Howes, Hayden, Hewson 

Critic Miss Edith Sisson 




Secretary Miss McGregor 

Business Manager Miss Lapowski 

Executive Com. . . .Misses Chase, Taylor, E. Clemens 

Critic Miss Wheldon 

Guard Isabelle Blackstock 

CLUB SONG. 

Who, oh, who, is the girl who is fair and bright? 
Who, oh, who, is the girl that hates wrong, loves 

right ? 
Strong in muscle, firm in mind, 
Happy in spirit, true and kind, 
She is the girl with the monogram hat, 
Heart-shaped pin with an owl in the middle of that, 
Merry of face and air so gay, 
Listen and you will hear her say : 
Shout D. A. N. ; here 's to Lasellia, 
Loud as you can, cheer for Lasellia. 
Ever be true to the gold and blue, 
Raise on high the banner of Lasellia. 




FOR NEXT YEAR. 

President Miss Deering 

Vice President Miss Kendrick 



April 17 — The Lasell battalions were roy- 
ally entertained at Newtonville by the 
Charles Ward Post of the G. A. R. The 
evening was very much enjoyed, and each 
girl was presented, as a memento, an army- 
button hatpin. 

> April 20 — The Missionary Society invited 
us into the gymnasium to hear the "Cradle 
Songs of Different Nations, given in Cos- 
tume." All the different peoples were rep- 
resented, and the "lullabys" finished, the au- 
dience moved around the room to gaze and 
laugh at the photographs of the Lasell girls 
as they appear at the tender ages of between 
two and five years. 

On the evening of April 27 the Juniors 
and Specials, with a few favored friends, 
were received by the Faculty in the parlors 
of Lasell. When all had assembled, there 



224 



LASELL LEAVES 



was a short programme, followed by light 
refreshments. Then came the usual rush 
for trains, all the guests realizing that when 
the Faculty feels inclined to entertain, one is 
assured of a "good time." 

Sunday evening, April 28, Frances Ham- 
ilton kindly agreed to give a song recital in 
the gymnasium, assisted by a selected quar- 
tette. The girls brought their cushions with 
them, in order to sit comfortably on the floor, 
and fully enjoyed Frances' ever-popular 
singing. 

On May 1st, after much surmising on the 
nature of the entertainment, we were invited 
by the Sophomore class to come into the 
gymnasium for a May Day party, including 
a May Pole dance, in which the entire class 
of 1903 participated. The different features 
of the dance were well done and heartily ap- 
plauded by the audience, from their reserved 
seats on the floor. The pole having been 
set aside, the girls danced to the inviting 
strains of an orchestra, until at a late hour 
duty, in the guise of Miss Carpenter, sug- 
gested our dispersion. 

Thursday evening, May 2, Miss Frances 
Eaton gave us some of her humorous charac- 
ter sketches, which were truly delightful and 
unique. 

On Sunday evening, May 5th, we had the 
pleasure of listening to another song recital, 
the solo parts being carried by Ethel Galla- 
gher, while the girls present joined in on all 
the Gospel Hymns. 

May 1 1 the girls assembled in the "gym" 
to listen to the wonderful melodies of the 
Claflin University Quintette. The boys 
sang well and were cordially invited to come 
again next year. 

On the evenings of May 20, 21 and 22, 
Miss Mary A. Mullikin of Cincinnati, Ohio, 
gave a series of lectures, beginning Monday 
evening with the "Morning and Noon of 
Flemish Art." The subjects of the three 



other lectures were "A Treasure Hunt in the 
Spanish Peninsula" and "Raphael, the Deco- 
rator," and "Creeds in Stone." The sub- 
jects were very interesting and were render- 
ed still more so by the sketched and photo- 
graphed illustrations. 

Thursday evening, May 23, Mr. William 

J. Mann lectured on "Art in History." 

♦ » , 

Est II Possible I 

She was a little polyglot, 

Was sweet Clorinda Belle; 
And puzzled much her precious brain 

To learn her "language" well. 
And how she practiced on them, 

The patient folk at home ! 
They sometimes wished to boarding school 

They had not let her roam. 
When they of some small thing would tell. 

"Est il possible!" cried Clorinda Belle. 

With Brother Will a-bicycling 

Clorinda rode one day, 
And as they wheeled they chatted of 

The beauties of the way. 
Clorinda tucked in German 

As often as she could, 
To prove to him her accent was 

Unusually good. 
And once, when from his wheel Will fell, 

"Eheu! quid agis?" shrieked Clorinda Belle. 

But most in exclamations 

She spoke, this learned maid, 
And had a favorite phrase or two, 

Which she full oft displayed. 
Her country cousin, come to town 

To visit her one day, 
Had on, it chanced, a brand-new gown, 

A marvel — in its way. 
And when fair Susan of its cost did tell, 

"Est il possible!" said Clorinda Belle. 

Her mother sent Clorinda down 

To ask the old black cook 
To teach her how to make a cake 

From Mrs. Lincoln's book. 
The cook explained the process, 

The novice standing by, 
And then she got materials, 

And told her she might try. 
That cake— like Babylon, it fell! 

"Est il possible!" sighed Clorinda Belle. 

One time too oft she used this phrase. 

And worked herself much woe, 
As you '11 acknowledge when I tell 



LASELL LEAVES 225 

What 't was that grieved her so. a code of laws for the freshmen. They seem a lit- 

John Jack came wooing her one day — tie wild and need to be brought under some restric- 

She loved the lad full fain, tion. 

But all unwittingly she caused King — I agree with you, but would advise to have 

Him woful grief and pain. the laws just as "few" as possible. 

"My darling girl," he said, "I love you well !" Lady Car. — I was also thinking it a good plan for 

"Est il possible!" gasped Clorinda Belle. the older and "wiser" girls to give a little reception 

The startled youth, who could not know to the freshmen. They can get acquainted much 

How fast her heart was beating, easier and P erha Ps they after that will feel more at 

Thought onlv, "She is making game!" home with the older S irls - 

And lost no time retreating. King— Indeed, I think that a very good plan. 

Poor Clo was left alone. She gazed— First Freshman— O ! I think this is the worst place 

In tears ber brown eyes swimming — ever saw ' 

Down street, where fast the manly form Second Fresh.— This morning I met the King and 

Of her John Jack was dimming. he lightened me so ! I thought he was "bluebeard." 

And as he rushed along pell-mell, Fresh - in chor.—O, does he look like that ! 

"Est il possible!" wept Clorinda Belle. Fwst Fresh.— Look ! there is the king. Do you 

suppose he has heard all we have said? 

Moral: Study your French and escape the toils of (Exit all the f righ tened freshmen.) 
matrimony. 

Query: (from the standpoint of Clorinda Belle's Scene 2 ~ Artillery Room (Gym.), 

father) : Does boarding school pay? Enter Freshmen, Sophomores and Seniors. 

From Fair Freshman'to Sedate Senior. , F ? r ? F "f h -™ J™ ™[ se ; ■** ru ^ s as are 

laid down for us. It is so hard to keep them. 

dramatis personae. Second Fresh.—O, they are awful ! Last night I 

CHARLES King of Lasell was in the blue room and did not leave until after 

LADY CAROLINE Lady of Lasell Palace the nine-ten bell had rung. I started down "Swell 

FRIAR CHARLES The King's Assistant Headed Row," when suddenly I came face to face 

GUY Prince of the House of Hur with Lady Caroline. I wished I had been in my 

MISTRESS MARY .... Tutor to the Sophomores own room. She wanted to know why I was not, 

MARTHA Mistress of Artillery Room and I had to tell her that a "senior" had told me 

Freshmen Sophomores that I was foolish to start just as soon as the bell 

Juniors Seniors rings, for I would not get caught if I did not leave 

for five minutes later. 

THE COMEDY OF ERRORS. pi rst Senior— It is "preposterous" how the fresh- 

Scene — Lasell Palace. men get into so much trouble. 

PROLOGUE. Second Senior — 

When I was a freshman fair, 

Enter Chorus - To break a rule I ne'er did dare; 

„_ , . _ „ , But now that I am a senior bright, 

In fair Lasell, where we lay our scene, j can do what T think right 

All has been quiet, calm, serene; ~ . , 

„ , , . . , „ Seniors, in chorus — 

But now there bursts through its spacious halls, For we are dignified seniorS; 

Laughing shouts and merry calls. And we , fe not afraid tQ tdl 

Girls old and new alike are here, That we are joUy good seniors> 

All united to bring good cheer. And ^ we are frQm LaseH 

The old-familiar with everything seem ; Sophs.-O, those freshmen will be the bother of our 

The new-how solemn! fresh! and green! ^ We ^ neyer p]an tQ gQ anywhere or do 

A CT I. anything without them. You know the "freshmen 

Scene 1 — Court Room (office) Lasell Palace. always want to go to everything that comes along for 

Enter King Charles, Lady Caroline, Freshmen. fear of missing something." 

King— Ah ! here come the freshmen fair, Freshmen, in chorus— 

In this comedy they're to share. As freshmen we've done very well, 

See ! in fright how they do shake, And been a credit to Lasell. 

And many "errors" will they make. We leave this year without a sigh, 

Lady Caroline — I think it a very good plan to have To be in one where we 're not shy. 



226 



LASELL LEAVES 



MUCH TO DO ABOUT NOTHING. 
ACT I. 
Scene I — Assembly Room (hall). 

Enter King Charles, Sophomores. 
King — Look you yonder in the hall, 

Hear the "Sophies" loudly call, 
Only last year "Freshies" they; 
Now they 're "sophs" in every way, 
Much about nothing they 're to do, 
And look to being juniors true. 

Scene 2 — Intelligence Room Number 4. 

Enter Mistress Mary and Sophomores. 

Mis. Mary — We are assembled here to learn about 
"force emphasis, and life, which all come under the 
main head of 'force.' " Have you all studied your 
lesson? 

Sophs. — Yes, Mistress Mary. 

Mis. Mary — Can you tell me in what way we gain 
force? 

Sophs. — "By the choice of words." 

Class excused. 

Sophs. — Happy juniors soon we '11 be, 
Merry, joyous, full of glee. 
Soph'more year we '11 ne'er forget, 
All the girls that we have met, 
All the fun that we have had, 
How oft' the teachers we 've made sad ! 

AS YOU LIKE IT. 

ACT I. 

Scene 1 — Artillery Room. 

Enter Juniors. 

Juniors, in chorus — 

Now as senior's "supes" we're true, 
Just as juniors ought to do. 
In "As You Like It" we can play, 
And when we 've finished who can say 
That we have not been juniors bright, 
And always done just what was right. 
First Junior — How do you like Shakespeare ? 
Second Junior — O, I think it is wild, but our 
teacher is "Wilder." 

Enter King. 
King — When we have a good speaker here on Com- 
mencement day, it is not one time out of ten that the 
girls remember half of what he says. Why not have 
a five dollar speaker then? What is the use of 
having a good one? 

Smart Jun. — If we have a good speaker, that will 
be the one time out of ten that we will remember 
what he says. 
Scene 2 — Banquet Room. 

Enter Friar Charles. 



Fri. Chas. — There will be an "opportunity" to go 
walking with the "prince" this afternoon. Do not 
fail to take advantage of this "opportunity." 
Juniors, in chorus — 

This year is past, much work we 've done, 
Some studies finished; some new friends won. 
And now we have one aspiration, 
Which is to leave our present station, 
And don the senior cap and gown, 
And then we '11 be of some renown. 

ALL IS WELL THAT ENDS WELL. 
ACT I. 
Scene 1 — Banquet Room. 

Enter King Charles, and Seniors. 
King — See our seniors in cap and gown, 

Compared to them none can be found. 
Let 's give three cheers for our seniors bright, 
Who are so loyal to the "blue and white." 
In these cheers let voices swell, 
For "all is well that ends so well." 
Seniors — We 're marching to a steady tune, 
Into the royal banquet room ; 
To our table in the middle aisle, 
We are marching in a double file. 
Scene 2 — Artillery Room. 

Enter Mistress Martha and Seniors. 
Mis. Martha — You do not go walking every day, 
therefore, you must take gymnasium. 

Seniors — We go to "gym." with smiling faces (but 
such a heavy heart). We are very happy that we 
have the privilege of trying the dear old machines 
again ; but we would rather leave them for the other 
fair maidens. We may wear them out, "using them 
so much." (However, we will give the impression 
that we enjoy it very much.) 
Scene 3 — Intelligence Room, Number 4. 
Enter Mistress Mary; Seniors. 
Mis. Mary — We will have a primary lesson in 
spelling. First senior, please spell Angel. 
First Senior — A-N-G-L-E. 

Mis. Mary — You certainly deserve to wear the cap 
and gown. 
Seniors, in chorus — 

Thus our senior year is done, 

And Lasell for us has won 

Many crowns for which we praise her, 

Loyal to our "Alma Mater." 



Marriages. 

— Jamie Louise Watson to John Lowry 
Wagner, Wednesday, April 24, at 9 o'clock, 
at the Normandie, Columbus, Ohio. After 
May 29, at home at Fairmont, W. Va. 

— Maude Mayo ('98) to Harry Bentz, on 



LASELL LEAVES 



227 



Tuesday, April 9, at Foxcroft, Me. Ad- 
dress : Larchmont Manor, New York. 

— Helen Thayer Turner to Harold Hallo- 
well Werner, on Tuesday, April 30, Auburn- 
dale, Mass. Address, after October 1 : No. 
332 Rich Avenue, Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 

— Mary Dana to Frederick Herbert Baird, 
on Wednesday, April 17, at Auburndale, 
Mass. Mrs. Baird is a sister of our Bessie 
Dana. 

— Alice Pauline Conant to Charles Frank- 
lin Sisson, Jr., on Wednesday, May 8, at 
Camden, N. Y. Address, after August 15, 
39 Oak street, Binghamton, N. Y. 

— Julia Elizabeth Hammond to George 
Joseph McBride, on Thursday, May 16, at 
Chicago. Address, after October 1, No. 
4598 Oaken wald Avenue. 

— 'May Louise Gurley to Edgar Hayes 
Betts, on Monday, May 27, at Troy, N. Y. 
Address, after November 1, No. 19 14 Fifth 
Avenue, Troy, N. Y. 

— Mary Abbie Thomas to William Darre 
Walker, on Thursday, May 29, at Peabody, 
Mass. Address, after October 15, No. 64 
Willow Avenue, West Somerville, Mass. 

— M. Corinne Salisbury to J. Edmund C. 
Fisher, on Saturday, June 1, at Beatrice, Ne- 
braska. 

— Mary Fuller Lothrop to Benjamin Fes- 
senden, on Thursday, June 4, at Stafford 
Springs, Connecticut. 

— Charlotte White to Sterling Frederick 

Higley, on Tuesday, June 4, at Glens Falls, 

N. Y. 

— Lorena M. Fellows to Frank Drum- 

mond Hight, on Tuesday, June 11, at Ban- 
gor, Me. 

— Ada Cadmus ('98) to Edward Alex- 
ander McCoy, on Monday evening, June 17, 
at East Orange, N. J. 

— Lois Mabel Sawyer to Franklin T. Mil- 
ler, on Tuesday, June 4, at Brookline, Mass. 

— Ida Frances Trowbridge to Dr. Louis 



D. H. Fuller, on Wednesday, June 19, at 
South Framingham, Mass. Address after 
August, Saxonville, Mass. 




PERSONALS. 

— From Edith Gale we learn that she has 
had a pleasant visit with Ada Dunaway Cald- 
well and Mary Roberts Ogden. Ada has 
two nice children, Edgar, a boy of five, and 
little Virginia, a year and a half. Mary, 
too, has two fine youngsters, both bright, 
sturdy boys. Edith spent the month of 
May, moreover, with Lou Sargeant Warren, 
in her pleasant St. Louis home, 5535 Von 
Versen avenue, which she has purchased. 

— Grace Allen saw Julia Hammond Mc- 
Bride and her husband on their way to Salt 
Lake, on their wedding trip. Elizabeth 
Stephenson Morgan is now settled in her 
new home in Oshkosh. Grace regrets not 
having been able to be with us at our fiftieth 
anniversary celebration. So do we. 

— Mabel Taylor spent the winter in Wash- 
ington with Mr. Gannett's parents, and in 
March, while she was still there, the elder 
Mr. Gannett died. She saw Anna Warner 
in Washington, and also Blanche Swope; 
and in New York, Florence Raymond. 
Martha Stone Adams and her husband have 
visited, she says, the Buffalo Exposition, and 
planned to visit Lasell before returning 
home. 

— Sara Hitchcock expresses her apprecia- 
tion of the Leaves, a copy of which she has 
recently received. We should be glad to 



228 



LASELL LEAVES 



add her name to the subscription list, and 
send the paper regularly. 

— At a violin recital given in Boston, April 
25, by the pupils of Miss Edith Linwood 
Winn, our popular violin teacher this year, 
several of her Lasell pupils were present, and 
enjoyed the evening greatly. 

— At an organ recital given April 8, in the 
Asylum Hill Congregational church, Hart- 
ford, Conn., the organist of the evening was 
S. Clarke Lord, who was assisted by Har- 
riette S. Ward, of the seminary class of grad- 
uates this year. 

— Elise Scott is visiting Avila Grubbs, at 
her pleasant home in Harrodsburg, Ken- 
tucky, and writes of having delightful times 
there. 

— Ruth Sankey Ripley, 2008 E. Union 
street, Seattle, Washington, informs us that 
she is the proud possessor of a very small 
boy, named Bradford Sankey; and that her 
father and mother have gone to Seattle to 
live next door to the Ripleys. Both are to 
build new homes, and, to quote Ruth, "live 
happy ever after." 

— Emma Goll Dacy has a wee baby girl, 
Marion Adele, born on Thursday, May 2nd, 
and a treasure. 

— Lulu Wells Brannen writes apprecia- 
tively of her visit here some time ago, and 
admiringly of Mr. and Mrs. Nordsick, who 
think of sending their daughter to Lasell 
next year. Clara Creswell Blakeney, she 
says, has another lovely boy, and Gertrude 
Seiberling, "the same strong, placid soul as 
of old," recently wrote her. For them- 
selves she says they are thinking of a trip 
East this summer, or, possibly, Europe again. 

— Nellie M. Richards writes, concerning 
the spring trip to Washington : "I was 
charmed with the girls, and think that if they 
are a fair sample, you must have a splendid 
lot this year. They were lovely to me, so 
that I enjoyed every moment of the trip." 



She was hoping when she wrote to be with 
us at Commencement. 

— Margie Schuberth speaks of having ex- 
changed visits with Dorothy, recently, and of 
Daisy Hartson's spring visit to Helen Cooke, 
on which occasion Greta Stearns Kinsey had 
"quite a little Lasell party at her home one 
day for luncheon, to meet Daisy." Margie 
was there, of course. 

— Ida Trowbridge, whose own reception 
on the occasion of the announcement of her 
engagement occurred but a short time ago, 
was present at the senior reception here, and 
looked to be in the best of health and spirits. 

— Caroline Baldwin has been studying 
music in New York this year with Miss Bis- 
sell, and appeared as one of the performers at 
a public rehearsal given May 10, in Mendels- 
sohn Glee Club Hall. 

— Alice Linscott Hall has news to tell us ; 
her husband has accepted the Greek profes- 
sorship in Washington University, St. 
Louis, to which city the family will move 
next September. Her "boy" she tells us, is 
six feet tall, and a freshman; and Elinor is 
already well into her sixteenth year. It 
seems hardly possible ! Mrs. Hall plans to 
attend Lasell's Commencement on the 
twenty-fifth anniversary of her graduation, 
but stipulates that Mr. Bragdon shall be 
there, sine qua non. 

— Mattie Baker, when last heard from by 
letter, was planning to sail with her mother, 
father, and brother, for America May 21, 
and expected to be with us at Commence- 
ment, though we did not see her at that time. 
Rev. Dr. G. D. Watson and his wife 
have been in Jamaica, she says, pursuing 
their evangelistic work. She met them and 
was pleased with them. Her brother and 
his wife live at Port Antonio. Mattie and 
her mother paid them a visit in May. Their 
baby boy, she says, is now eight months old, 
and "a real Baker." His Aunt Mattie is as 



LASELL LEAVES 



229 



proud of him as she can be, and threatens to 
bring him to Lasell to show him off. 

— Sade Hollingsworth Thompson, whose 
sweet voice delighted us in other years, when 
she was a student here at Lasell, came back 
with her husband to see us this June, to be 
present at the Semi-Centennial celebration, 
and while here sang for us on the evening of 
Baccalaureate Sunday, and again on Com- 
mencement Day. We wish her old friends 
and schoolmates who have not seen her since 
they were here together might have been 
with us then, to hear for themselves what a 
splendid voice she has — full, rich, powerful, 
and in perfect control. She has, too, that 
rare accomplishment in a singer, perfect 
enunciation. It was a memorable treat that 
she gave us. She is looking well. Mr. 
Thompson is a pleasant and agreeable gen- 
tleman. 

— Fraulein Adele Roth, now connected 
with the Classical School for Girls, in Pasa- 
dena, Cal., sends an interesting letter, in 
which she gives sundry items of information, 
some about herself, others about some of our 
old girls. She met in Los Angeles the other 
day Sue Stearns that was, who has a fine 
little boy, and whose husband, now in Eng- 
land, is to return to America soon. Zoe 
Lowe Brown's little girl is a beautiful child. 
Katharine Watson, now Mrs. Jas. Pugh, is 
living in a charming bungalow on Lockha- 
ven street, Pasadena. Fannie Watson is 
studying art at Pittsburg. Mabel Falley's 
husband is a Methodist now, and has a 
church at Detroit. Emma Roth was grad- 
uated from Stanford this month. About 
herself she says that she is enjoying her 
present situation very much, and gives us a 
hint of the delights of California in May- 
time — such gorgeousness and luxuriance of 
flowers, and such sunshiny days. 

— In the Advance- Journal of Camden, N. 
Y., a copy of which was kindly sent us, we 



find a very interesting account of Alice 
Conant's wedding early in May. Her 

beautiful home, Grove Cottage, was made 
even more lovely by the profusion of flowers 
used to decorate it for the occasion, and the 
ceremony was the impressive one of the 
Episcopal church. Bridesmaids, maids of 
honor, beautiful costumes — nothing dear to 
the heart of a bride was wanting. May we 
not, though late, cast our handful of rice 
also after the pair, and wish them much hap- 
piness ? 

— The friends of Lucy Ames and Elsie 
Burdick will be grieved to learn of the be- 
reavement that has visited these two of our 
girls, and those who knew bright-eyed 
Bertha Wilson will also be saddened to learn 
of her untimely death. 

— If you want to know what maple syrup 
really is you must have the good fortune of 
the Principal, and taste the product of a 
well-bred Vermont sugar maple, raised and 
trained by Miriam Nelson's grandfather. 
This pleasure the Principal has had by Miss 
Nelson's kindness, and is ready to say 
"Vixi." He has reveled in maple syrups 
before, but declares this of rare flavor and 
great consistency, and wishes he could share 
it with all of you. 

— On his visit to New York to see his 
brother and family off for Europe, on the 
Hohenzollern, sailing May 18, Mr. Bragdon 
met Mrs. Fanny Barker Coffin, '68, who with 
her two sisters, were passengers, and our 
own Lou Barker, here in his early years, who 
was there to see Mrs. Coffin off. A very 
pleasant meeting and good wishes. 
/ — Nellie Feagles, ('97) who has just re- 
turned from a two years' stay in Europe, 
made a brilliant record in Berlin, taking her 
degree second in a large class; and Nellie 
didn't pay much attention to German here 
usually, either. / 

— One of the pleasant surprises of April 



230 



LASELL LEAVES 



was the appearance of Kittie Seiberling 
Firey and her husband, who are "taking their 
wedding trip" in rather an extensive fashion 
throughout the East. As noted in the last 
Leaves, they have been living in Indiana- 
polis, but are soon to go to take charge of 
the Coates House, the best hotel in Kansas 
City. Mr. Firey is following the usual cus- 
tom of the genial Boniface. Kittie doesn't 
seem to me to have changed a bit. They 
took them for bride and groom in Washing- 
ton, which rather amused them, since they 
have been married seven years. She reports 
all well in Akron. 

— John Cassidy and his wife, principals of 
the National Park Seminary, Forest Glen, 
Maryland, made us a welcome call the last of 
February. They wore good clothes, and in 
every way looked prosperous. One could 
hardly believe their statement that Mrs. Cas- 
sidy had been ill several months of the pres- 
ent year. They both looked as if they had 
never known sickness, or want, or trouble. 
They were searching for good New England 
teachers for their popular school, in which 
they have been abundantly successful. To 
see them and to hear them was a rare pleas- 
ure, making a red-letter day of that Monday. 

— Mary, Hathaway Farnham ('88) 
"mothers" five boys of the Roxbury Latin 
School, in which Mr. Farnham is a teacher, 
living in the old Admiral Winslow house. 

— Mr. Herbert Ingalls Gannett, of Omaha, 
Nebraska, to whom Mabel Taylor has an- 
nounced her engagement, called on Mr. 
Bragdon early in May. He is a manly fel- 
low. 

— Emilie Kothe sends post card from 
Rome, expressing her desire that she might 
have been with us during Commencement, 
not even the charms of the Eternal City be- 
ing able to efface those of Lasell. 

— Miss Grace Huntington, ('89), called 
June 20. She is living in Brooklyn now, 



and looks just the same as ever. She says 
Blanche Pruyne has changed into a physical 
condition more suitable for active service; 
that Sue Hackett has lost her second child. 

Mr. and Mrs. Frederic Aldin Hall 

request the pleasure of your company 

at their 

Twentieth Wedding Anniversary, 

Monday evening, June the seventeenth, 

eight until eleven o'clock, 

958 Benton Avenue, 

Spring-field, Missouri. 

This was our Alice Linscott of '78. 

— A late paper from Wheeling has the 
following: "Anna Chamberlin, wife of 
William P. Hubbard, who entered into rest 
Friday night, June 7, was a woman of re- 
markable character. While not widely 
known, she impressed all who came within 
her circle by the strength of her religion and 
the sweetness of her charity. The daughter 
of a Presbyterian minister, the Rev. Nelson 
P. Chamberlin, she was always devoted to 
that church. Her life was in her home, 
where she welcomed all who came, and 
charmed by her kindly hospitality. She 
was for many years a great invalid, and the 
attention of her daughters was beautiful." 
This is the mother of our Julia, Alma, and 
Louise. Our sympathy is theirs, and their 
father's. 

OVERHEARD. 

Why was Room 22 so dark and gloomy the last 
term of school? Because there was no Day there. 

Dr. G. — When Briggs is with the girls he should 
dispense with his other canine friends. 

We had always thought we saw out of our eyes 
until Mr. B., in chapel, one day said, "Now open 
your ears and look." 

Teacher (in trigonometry class) — What are the 
great circles of the earth? 

Pupil — I do not know, unless they are the hemi- 
spheres. 

A Senior (standing on the veranda, watching the 
girls playing hop-scotch, exclaimed) — Oh, see! the 
girls are playing butter-scotch. 

What is E. D.'s favorite vegetable? Onion, 



LASELL LEAVES 



231 



GYMNASIUM STATISTICS. 



AVERAGE. 

Weight, 

Height, 

Lung Capacity, 

Strength of Back, 
of Chest, 
of R. Forearm, 
of L. Forearm, 



SEPT., 1900. 

119.18 Ids. 
5 ft. 4.54 in. 
149.53 cu. in. 
87.35 kilos. 
27.4 kilos. 
23.53 kilos. 
19.62 kilos. 



may, 1901. 

124.92 lbs. 
5 ft. 4.78 in. 
162.19 cu. in. 
120.76 kilos. 

31.96 kilos. 

25.61 kilos. 

22.2 kilos. 



Number of pupils incapacitated for gymnastic work 

during the school year, 
Number of pupils in the gymnasium during the 
school year, 



141 




STRONGEST PUPIL (MAY, 


1901). 


££ 6 ' 




18 years. 


Weight, 




127^ pounds. 


Lung Capacity. 




230 cu. inches. 


Strength of Back, 




160 kilos. 


Strength of Chest, 




38 kilos. 


Strength of Right Forearm, 


33 kilos. 


Strength of Left Forearm, 


30 kilos. 


Height, 




5 ft. 7.6 in. 


SENIOR CLASS MEMBERS 


(16). 


Average. 




Average Gain 


Age, 


19 yrs. 9 mos. 




Weight, 


123.3 lbs. 


5.77 lbs. 


Height, 


5 ft. 4.176 in. 


.724 in. 


Lung Capacity, 


159.69 kilos. 


20 cu. inches. 


Strength of Back, 


118.125 kilos. 


33.75 kilos. 


of Chest, 


30.5 kilos. 


4.25 kilos. 


of R. Forearm 


25.69 kilos. 


2.19 kilos. 


of L. Forearm, 


21.875 kilos. 


3.19 kilos. 


Tallest pupil (Miss '. 


Kendrick), 


5 ft. 9.3 in. 


Heaviest weight, 




195.5 lbs. 


Lightest weight, 




80.5 lbs. 


Greatest gain in weiL 


?bt, 


29.5 lbs. 


Greatest gain in strength, 


123 kilos. 


Next greatest gain in 


strength, 


Ill kilos. 



To Women 



From Viennese Patterns 
fabric front JToreig-n Looms. 

Manufactured by the Celebrated Makers, 
Messrs. Flsk, Clark & Flagg, New York. 



Penang-, Madras, Cheviot, Pique, 

Linen, lawn, 

$3.50 to $6.00 
BLOUSES Cheviot, Pique, $4.50 

Flannel, Breg-e, Silk, 

$5.00 to $10.00 

NECK DRESS \%Sg£ZE& 

75o. to $2.50 
GLOVES Mannish Style, $2.00 

RFLTS i Pi 4 ne leather, Silk, Satin. 

' 76o to $10.00. 

COLLARS Many Styles. l5o. and 25o. 



SHIRTS 



WAISTS 



RAY 



OUTFITTER 

TO 

MEN AND WOMEN. 



SO© Washing-ton St., cor. West. 



Number pupils gained in all strength tests, 



49 



THE BEST IS NONE TOO GOOD 
FOR A LASELL GIRL. 




WE have been chosen to make, for MEMBERS OF THE CLASS OF 1901, the BEST 
and MOST ARTISTIC PHOTOGRAPHS they have ever had. 
Members of other classes will be given a VERY LOW SCHOOL RATE upon our 
HIGH ART PRODUCTIONS. 

21 WEST STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 



232 



LASELL LEAVES 



Foot Anatomy, 



! Is a branch of science that the skilled shoe 
j maker has to thoroughly master. The 
J makers of 




have, after years of experience, acquired a 
knowledge enabling them to produce shoes 
that have a snug, glove-like fit at the heel, 
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finest custom-made shoes, and they reveal a 
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(Forty styles in all Leathers.) 



Always 



S3.50 



Pair. 



Winter Street, Boston. 



;._ ...- 



Shepard, Norwell & Go. 



C. RAYMOND di LUC CI, 

CHOICE FRUITS, CANOY, NUTS, ETC. 

CIGARS and TOBACCO. 

365 A.TJBTTMN STREET, corner ASIC 8TMEJS1 

AZTBTJUNDAIjE, MASH. 

B. S. COLE 



MUTTON, LAMB, VEAL, 

POULTRY and GAME 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL. 



Stalls 13 and 15, Faneuil Hall Market, Boston. 

Telephone connection. 

George W. Kimball & Co., 

Wholesale and retail dealers in 

Poultry, Game, Beef, Mutton, Lamb and Yeal. 

Basement, No. 32a North Street, opposite Merchants' 
Row, Boston. 

Telephone 927 Haymarket. 



Howard M. Smith. 



Albert P. Smith. 



SMITH BROTHERS. 

(Successors to Geo. H. Philbrook & Co.) 

Butter, Cheese, Eg'g's 

Stalls No. 2 and 4, 
Faneuil Hall Market, Boston, Mass. 

Telephone, Haymarket 884. 



Business Established 1817. 



JOHN H. PRAY & SONS CO. 



Wholesale and retail dealers in 



CABPETS .a^to :R,TTC3-S 



of both Foreign and Domestic Manufacture; also 



Curtains, Draperies, Portieres 



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descriptions 

of choice 



Upholstery Fabrics 



^"PRICES ALWAYS MODERATE^sgg 



o-OKisr hi. zpiR^ir & soisrs oo. 

Oldest and Iiarg-est Carpet House in Jf«» England. 
PRAY BUILDING-, Opposite Boylston St. 

6 5 8 WASHIN6T0N STREET, BOSTON, 6 5 8 



LASELL LEAVES 



233 




Blanket Wraps 

For the Nursery. 
For the Sick Room. 
For the Bath. 

For Steamer Traveling. 
For the Eailway Carriage. 
For Yachting. 
For Men, Women, Children and the 
Baby, $2.75 to $35, with Hood and 
Girdle complete. 



Ladies' Shirt and Golf Waists, 
$5.00 to $20.00. 

From Madras, Oxfords, Cheviot, French 
Percales, English and French Flannels, 
Silk and Moire Poplin. 



A Special Department for 

Ladies' Golf Waists, 
Bicycle and Golf Skirts, 
Entire Golfing Suits. 

GOLF CLUBS, 
GOLF BALLS and 
CADDY BAGS. 




NOYES BROS. 

Washington and Summer Streets, 

BOSTON, Mass., U. S. A. 



You should call or send for sample of 

King's Royal Bond. 



Most bond papers as good sell for about double the 

price of this. 

Per Quire Five Quires 

JtK,, 120 Sheets, £ <j? j 



25 Envelopes, 



}2^C 



100 Envelopes, 5 



This comes in three colors — white, azure and ceru- 
lean blue — -and in the very latest fashionable sizes. 

Por» D l/inn. Art Stationer and Engraver. 

UuUi Di IMllg, 250 Roylston St., Boston, Mass. 

Calling Cards and Die Stamping a specialty. 



SHOES FOR 
YO UNG LADIES. 

Newest Shapes. Newest Styles for Gym- 
nasium, Tennis, Walking and Dress. 

WE GIVE TEN PER CENT. DISCOUNT 
TO A LI LA.SELL STUDENTS. 

THE HENRY H. 
TUTTLE CO., 

Cor. WASHINGTON and WINTER STS., 
BOSTON. 



DAVIS, CHAPIN CO. 

J. A. BARKER, President. 

Commission Merchants and Wholesale 
Sealers in Foreign and Domestic 

Fruits and Produce. 

83 and 85 Faneuil Hall Market, 

Cellar 15 South Side, 

Boston, Mass. 

Telephone Haymarket 777. 



MILLS & DEERING, 

Receivers and Dealers in Fine Grades of 

BUTTER 

A.ND STRICTLY FRESH EGGS. 

FIRST NATIONAL, BANK 

OF WEST NEWTON, MASS. 

James H. Nickerson, Pies. A. R. Mitchell, Vice-Pres. 

Edward P. Hatch, Cashier. 

General Banking, Collection and Exchange. 
Capital, $100,000. 

Business hours daily, 8.30 to 12 a m. and 1 to 3 p.m. 
Saturdays, 8.30 a. m. to 12 m. Sal'e deposit boxes to rent in 
new fire and burglar proof vault. 



234 



LASELL LEAVES 



JOSHUA THOBNDIKE. 



CHAS. W. SPEAR 



JOSHUA THORNDIKE & CO. 



DEALERS IN 



MUTTON, LAMB and VEAL 

Stalls 3 and 5 New Faneuil Hall Market, 
BOSTON, MASS. 

Edward E. Babb & Co. 

25 Arch St., Boston, Mass. 

Dealers in 

w 

SCHOOL BOORS and SCHOOL SUPPLIES 

D. A. HOWE 

273 MAIN STREET, WORCESTER, MASS 

WHOLESALE GROCER. 

Gallons Canned Goods of all kinds and of tlie best 
quality a specialty. Teas and Coffees. 




Roses, 

Carnations, 

Violets, 

Daffodils, 

Forget-me-not, 

Lily ofthe Valley 

Auburndale, Mass. 
Telephone. 



Mrs. C. H. HALL, 

DRESSMAKER. 

Work dene at reasonable prices. 

Speeial ratea to students, 

490 AUBURN STREET, AUBURNDALE. 



e * BOSIOKMass, 

|tabUiej] 



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TRAOt MAS* . 



FINEST ROAD-BED ON THE CONTINENT. 



Boston and Albany Railroad. 



THROUGH CAR SERVICE IN EFFECT APRIL 20, 1901. 



No. 7 — Leaves Boston at 8.30 a. m. except Sunday. Pullman vestibuled parlor car, Boston to Albany. 
No. 15 — Leaves Boston at 10.45 a - m - daily. Pullman vestibuled buffet library-smoking-car and vestibuled 

sleeping cars. Boston to Chicago, via L. S. & M. S. R. R. to St. Loui's via Big Four 

Route. Dining car service. 
No. 19-17 — Leaves Boston at 2.00 p. m. daily. (The North Shore Special) Pullman vestibuled sleeping 

cars, Boston to Cleveland and Chicago. Dining-car service. 
No. 23 — Leaves Boston at 3.30 p. m. except Sunday. Pullman vestibuled sleeping cars, Boston to 

Niagara Falls. Tourist sleeping car Boston to Chicago. 
No. 37 — Leaves Boston at 6.00 p. m. daily. Pullman vestibuled sleeping car, Boston to Cleveland and 

Cincinnati via L. S. & M. S. R. R. ; also Pullman vestibuled sleeping car, Boston to Detroit 

and Chicago via M. C. R. R. 
No. 63 — Leaves Boston at 11.00 p. m., except Saturday. Pullman sleeping car, Boston to Albany, arriv- 
ing at 7.57 a. m. 
For information, maps, time-tables, tickets and accommodations in drawing-room and sleeping cars, 
apply to agents of Boston & Albany Railroad at its several stations. 

J. L. WHITE, City Pass, and Ticket Agent, or to A. S. HANSON, Gen. Pass. Agent. 

The only first-class through line from New England to the West. 



City Ticket Office, 366 Washington St., Boston 



LASELL LEAVES 



235 




BONBONS 
CHOCOLATE? 

Delicious Ice Cre^rp Soda. 

45 TREMONT STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 

PLEASE FORWARD GOODS BY 

JOHNSON & KEYES EXPRESS CO. 

AUBURNDALE AND BOSTON EXPRESS. 
Offices: 34 Court Sq., 77 Kingston, 105 Arch Streets 
BOSTOU. 

WAUWINET FARM. 

COMMONWEALTH AVE. AND VALENTINE ST., 

WEST NEWTON, MASS. 
All interested in a modern Dairy are invited to visit the Farm. 



DEALER IN 



PROVISIONS. 

Corner Auburn and Lexington Streets, 

.Auburn dale, Mass. 



Established 1830 

Alfred Mudge & Son 
PRINTERS 

24 Franklin Street, Boston 

CLASS PRINTING 
A SPECIALTY 



.Andrew J. Lloyd & Co. 
OPTICIANS 

DOWN-TOWN-323 Washington St., opp. Old South Church. 

BACK BAY— 310 Bojlston St., opp. Arlington St. 

Bring your prescriptions for Eyeglasses and Spectacles to us. 
A complete line of Photographic Goods always in stock. The 
best place in Boston to have your developing and printing 
done. Send for our price list. 

Rockwell /vwd Churchill. 



PRINTERS 

THIRTY-NINE AROH STREET, 

BOSTON, MASS. 



SCHOOL ANNUALS, 
ANNOUNCEMENTS, 
CATALOGUES. 



PRINTERS OF LASELL CATALOGUE. 



Francis Bachelder. 



F. S. Snyder 



Francis Batchelder 
& Co. 

Beef, Pork, Mutton, Veal, Poultry, 

Game, Hams, Bacon, Lard, Butter, 

Cheese, Eggs, Cream, etc. 

Wholesale 

Provisions and Produce 

Proprietors of CAPITOL CREAMERIES, 

Central Station, Montpelier, Vt. 



Poultry and Egg House, 

Fenton, Michigan. 



Smote Houses, Sausage Factory, Ham Cooking Fac- 
tory, Cold Storage, etc., 55, 57, 59, 61 and 63 
Blackstone Street, 

Boston, Mass. 



G. L. Lawrence. f. B. Eastman. 

J. P. LAWRENCE & CO., 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

Poultry, T^ilcl Oame. 

Goods for Shipping a Specialty. 

30 FANEUIL HALL MARKET, BOSTON. 

Telephone, Haymarket 919. 



^daiuss Ac Crilbert, 

OPTICIANS. 

MANUFACTURERS of Spectacles and Eye Glasses, and Im- 
"± porters of Opera, Field and Marine Glasses and Optical 
Goods of every description. Oculists' prescription work a 
specialty. 

165 Tremont Street, Boston. 



236 



LASELL LEAVES 



WOODLAND PARK HOTEL 

AUBURNDALE, MASS. 

Five minutes' walk from Lasell. Open all the year. 
CHAS C. BUTLER. 



HENRY W. GOODWIN, 

78-80 Broad Street, Boston, Mass. 

BRYANT & MAY'S 

LONDON PARLOUR MATCHES- 

Pfcfcpped Stoek 

MOCHA AND JAVA 

COppEE. 

THE HIGHEST GRADE OF BLENDED COFFEE. 

BOASTED AND PACKED BY 

Martin L. Hall & Co., 

Boston, Mass. 

J, WOODWARD 

FISH, OYSTERS, EGGS, CANNED GOODS, 
VEGETABLES, ETC. 

Cor. Auburn and Ash Sts., Auburndale, Mass. 

BARLOW'S ICE CREAM. 

J. B. SANDERSON, Proprietor. 

Telephone 261-3. WEST NEWTON, MASS. 

Catering in all its branches at reasonable prices. 



BEEF, PORK, LARD, HAMS, BACON, 
PIGS' FEET and TRIPE. 



STURTEVANT & HALEY 
BEEF and SUPPLY CO. 

38 and 40 Faneuil Hall Market, 
BOSTON, MASS. 



TALLOW, STEARINS, 
FINE OLEO, OIL, SCRAP, Eto. 



CHARLES F. HATHAWAY, 

MANUFACTURING BAKER. 



Crackers, Biscuit, Bread, Cake and Pastry. Wholesale 
jobber of Kennedy's Celebrated Crackers. Hathaway's 
original Home-made Cream Bread, best in the world, 
kept by all leading grocers. 

Factories: 1906 Mass. Ave., Cambridge. 
769 Main Street, Waltham. 



C. F. Hovey & Co. 

33 Summer Street. 
42 Avon Street. 



Importers of 



Dress Goods, Silks, 
Cloaks, Suits, Laces, 

Underwear, Small Wares. 



W. H. PRIOR. C. A. PRIOR 

PRIOR BROS. 

Successors to Wni. Prior, Jr., & Co. 
Wholesale and retail dealers in all kinds of 

Ocean, Lake and River Fish, Oysters and Clams 

127 and 129 Faneuil Sail Market, Boston, Mass. 

Telephone, 673 Haymarket. 



!T©wli©3a Zee Company. 

T/^'C 1 sold by us is cut from Longfellow's Pond, Wellesley 
iv^Jii Hills. Water from pond is used in Wellesley public 
service. The Newton Ice Co. is prepared to furnish a first 
class quality of 3P03NT3D ICE in West Newton, Newtou- 
ville, Auburndale, Newton Lower Falls and Wellesley Hills. 

MILLER & HATCH, Props. 

P. O. Address, Newton Lower Falls. 



A Hardware Store for a hundred years. 

Bnrditt & Williams 

Dealers in 

Builders' and General Hardware 
Supplies, Tools and Cutlery. 

20 DOCK SQ., BOSTON. 



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